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Full text of "Hardware merchandising (January-June 1902)"

Library 

of the 

University of Toronto 



\ nappy and Prosperous New Year to all 

—USE— 

LANGWELL S BABBITT 
Montreal. 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal. Heating. Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada 



VOL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JANUARY 4, 1902 



NO. I. 




* CUTLERY 



FOR SALE BY LEADINQ WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES. 



Lysaght's Black Sheets 

" Queen's Head " C.R.CA.— Highest grade, dead flat. 
"Southern CPOSS" C.R.CA. — First-class quality, 
dead flat. 

"Southern Cross" C. A.— Same sheets, not dead flat. 
Electrical Sheets, Tack Sheets, etc., etc. 
No common sheets made. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers. A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL, 
BRISTOL, ENG. Managers Canadian Branch. 







The Best of All. 



The "Sajfford" Radiator is the climax of 
radiator manufacturing . Ifs taken some years to 
reach that climax but the "Safford" is there, and alone 
acknowledged leader of them all. 

It' s a simple radiator made without bolts or pack- 
ing. It' s for hot-water and steam heating. 

Don't decide on a heating plant until you hear 
about the "Safford" . We are at the end of a two-cent 
stamp with a bundle of information cheerfully 
given. Send for catalogue. 



THE DOMINION RADIATOR COMPANY, Limited, 

HEAD OFFICE, DUFFERIN STREET, 
The Largest Makers of Radiators in Canada. TORONTO. CANADA. 






&&*& FINE **** 



English Cutlery 



•*w*v****r*i** 



CARVERS IN CASES 
DESSERT SETS 
FISH EATERS 
CAKE KNIVES 
BREAD FORKS, Etc. 



t««*AA«AMAAAftt*AAA*«*tAAAAA*A4 






lUMII I I I IIIIIIII I III »f » MU »t»»l 

BRASS KETTLES 
CHAFING DISHES 
HOT- WATER PLATES 
BRASS INK STANDS 
PAPERWEIGHTS, Etc. 



tmniiininitt 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



Cor. King and Victoria Streets. 



INI 



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£ 
£ 
£ 
£ 



£ 
E 



COPPER 

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Ingot, Bar, Sheet, Tubing. 



Samuel. Sons & Benjamin, London and Liverpool, Eng. 

M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 



3 
3 
3 



General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants. 

fe 27 Wellington St. West, -^TORONTO, ONT. 

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CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




<£ Australasian «£ 
Hardware and Machinery, 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
and Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 

post free to any part of the world. 



PUBLISHING OFFICES: 

Melbourne 
Sydney, 

AMERICAN OFFICES: 

New York, 

BRITISH OFFICES: 

London, - 



Fink's Buildings. 

Post Office Chambers. 

Park Row Building. 



- 42 Cannon St., E.C. 
Specimen Copies on application. 



C.R.Co. Star 




RED RUBBER PACKING 

FOR HIGH-GRADE WORK 



Good Packing Good Price 



Good Profits 



Good Advertising Matter 



Send for samples, prices and advertising matter. 



The Canadian Rubber Co. 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 




Our "YANKEE" Tool Book 
tells all about them. Mailed 



free on application. 



No. 15. "Yankee Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 




_^ U^L 

No. 30 "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




No. 41. "Yankee" Automatic Drill," Eight Drill Points in Handle. 




No. 50. "Yankee " Reciprocating Drill, for Iron, Steel, Brass, Wood, etc. 



Manufacturers also of 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chlppers. 
Fluting Machines, 

Hand Fluters. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 







No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 

Screw Driver. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Millions of pounds of "C" brand Horse Nails have 
been used in shoeing horses in Canada since 1865, anc ^ 
every pound has proved them to be the best Horse 
Nail made in Canada. They always give the farrier 
the most satisfactory results in every respect. They 
cost a trifle more, but are the most economical to use 
and the easiest for the merchant to sell. 

We thank every dealer who has sold "C" Horse 
Nails in 1901, and convey to them our sincere wishes 
for a Happy and Prosperous New Year. 

CANADA HORSE NAIL COMPANY, MONTREAL. 



GASOLINE MANTLES. 



5-inch high pressure Gasoline Mantles, the 
best that have yet been put on the market. 
We defy competition in the manufacture of 
these mantles. We also manufacture the 
" Gloria " Triple- weave and the " United " 
Single-weave for incandescent gas lights. 

Send for Price List. 



The United Incandescent Light Co., 

7 Vonge St. Arcade, TORONTO. 

Phone Main 969. 



Lockerby & McGomb 

AGENTS IN CANADA 

FOR THE 

Celebrated P. & B. 

Cold Storage Lining 

AND 

. . Ruberoid Roofing . . 

P. S. — Prices on Application. 

65 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 



WE ARE NOT IN THE TRUST. 



Quality of our goods guaranteed and our discounts very i 
■ liberal. A trial order solicited. Write for discounts. 



s. 



99 Niagara St., TORONTO FILE CO. 

CANADIAN GOODS FOR CANADIANS. 



s. 



OPENING THE SEASON WITH A FULL ASSORTMENT 







Churchs ALABASTINE. 



The only Wall-Coating that is extensively advertised 
and in demand. That is known to be permanent, 
because it has stood the test of time, and that sells 
on its own merits. ALL DEALERS will recoguize the importance of having goods in stock when customers 
want them. Don't put otf. Order early, to get and be able to give prompt service. Alabastine is ready for 
use by the addition of Cold Water, a feature that is protected by patents. Beware of imitations. Write The 
Alabastine Co., Limited, Paris, Ont., for special inducements to practical men. The trade supplied bv 
Wholesale Hardware and Paint Dealers. Also by 

THE ALABASTINE CO., Limited, Paris, Ontario. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO 



■ WHOLESALE ^ ~ _,_ 

only 37-39 rront Street West, Toronto. 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE 



CROSS CUT SAWS 




rrjr, 



Wnlw^ 




' Triumph "-Henry Disston's Champion Tooth, Narrow Blade (as out) 
" Racer "—No. 0. Shurly & Dietrioh, Lance Tooth, " 






"~-v////// 




EXTRA THIhtBtCK 

I 1 ^PATENT GROUND i ' 



,o^ei i0f , 



IMPROVED 1 CROSS -CUT 
-rTD EXTRA, MJGH TEMPERCZ 



^ 



Henry Disston's " Toledo Blade." 

BET' 




j ih MLERrC4 iir 



® 



CUTTER 



MA0E_FR[»<r 

EXTRA FINE SILVER ItEELS 



^fi 



J 








* : jTrfflN BACK l % 

GAST STEEL. WAPANTED. 

■-THE OJ^KXFORO MFG.SL, limited 

':', ST. PAW..-' gSESEG. 







LANCE 

THE O..S,RIXFORb: Ma.C0^ift^8 
sr. paul. - . 'mses. ; 



No. 15— "Amerioan Keen Cutter.' 



"The President. 



i 3- 




Qfffl 




No. 12— "Rixford Lance. 





No. 10— "The Rixford King." 




No. 0-"The Racer. 



No. 1— "The Lance." 
ALSO 

NicholSOn, and Kearney & FOOte'S Files and Rasps; Heller BrOS' Horse Rasps; Cross Cut Saw Handles 
Steel Wedges, Cant Hooks, Peavies, Pike Poles, Boot Calks. Chopping Axes, Coil Chain, Axe Handles, etc, etc'. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto. 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY 



Graham fire and Cot Nails are tbe Best. 

Factory: Dufferin Street, Toronto. 



OUR PRICES 

ARE RIGHT 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 

Manufacturers of the celebrated 




HFtS£C> 

BARB and PLAIN 

GALVANIZED WIRE 

We make a Specialty of 

PLATED WARE, 
FRUIT KNIVES, ETC. 

Our Canadian Representative carries a full line 
of samples. 

Canadian Office : 

6 Jt. Sacrament St., MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 




WRIGHT'S 

Insect 
Sprayers 



PLAIN TIN, 
LACQUERED, 
ALL BRASS. 

"BEST ON EARTH." 



Manufactured by 

E.T. WRIGHTS CO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. 

KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32, Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 




®c 



"SECCOTINE" 

FOR STICKING EVERYTHING. 



&&■:: 




Samples sent free on application.. 
Brand Horse 



HORSE NAILS-" C 

Canada Horse Nail Co. 

"BRASSITE" GOODS 

Limited, Birmingham, Eng. 



Nails 
Castor Co. 



(%*<££ ^&U&tr trite <U*i>£ic<aZ**ns 



THE INDEPENDENT CORDAGE CO., Limited, 



TORONTO. 



Highest Award Pan-American Exposition 



MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 



sisal ROPE, Lath Yarn, Shingle Yarn, Hide Cord, BINDER TWINE 

MANILA __^^^^^ _ j* m mtt^^^^^^^^^^^^^^mmm 

Pulp Cord, Clothes Lines. 



Transmission Rope a specialty. 



SAW-SET 




ASK YOUR HARDWARE MERCHANT FOR IT - 

TAKENOOTHER. FAILING TO DO ITS f* 
& WORK YOUR MONEYWILLBERETURNED [ 
£ R.DILLON, OSHAWAont. k 



Why take imitations when 
you can buy the genuine 
goods just as cheap ? 

"Whiting" Saw Sets 
"Whiting Universal" Saw Sets 
"Champion Jointer" Saw Sets 
English Steel Scythes 
Axes, etc, 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON-EJECTING. 



12 and 16 Gauges. 
Steel and Twist Barrels. 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
"Take 
Down" 
Gun Made. 




HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 

Also makers of H. & R. Revolvers, 
Catalog on request. Worcester, Mass., U.S-A- 



Stevens single barrel shot gun. 



LATEST AND 
BEST SINGLE 
GUN ON THE 
MARKET. 




MADE IN 
THREE STYLES 
THREE GAUGES 
UP-TO-DATE. 



FINEST SINGLE GUN YET PRODUCED. 

Our Goods are Handled by the Leading Jobbers. 

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p °2i7° x Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. 



A London Fence Machine ?j£!Z"l 

THEY SAVE 50 per cent. 

A little trouble to introduce them will create a per- 
manent demand. One agency only in each town. 

Kinkora, Perth Co., July 15th, /go/. 
Cattlemen, — I have been successful in placing with 
farmers of this township about thirty London Fence 
Machines and a large amount of other fence supplies. 
My patrons are all well pleased, and speak of the London 
as the best machine to build a good cheap fence. 1 expect 
to sell a great many more next season, as they cannot 
be beaten. 

I am, yours truly, D. HARAGAN. 



Closest prices on Coiled Spring Wire to the trade. 




The London Fence Machine Co., 



Limited 
London, Ont. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



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A 

Prosperous 

NEW 
YEAR 
TO 
ALL 



A^W\VWVW/WWWVWVWWWWV\ 



1902 



>VV>VVVVVVVVni^/VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV 



WAIT 

FOR 

OUR 

REPRESENTATIVES : 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

H. H. CLARK 
J. A. DEMERS 
F. E. DENNISON 
S. R. KENNEDY 
B. S LEAK 
M. MORELL 
R. McALLEN 

B. SAUNDERS 

C. SMALLPIECE 
VV. R. TAIT 

J. W. TAYLOR 
J. C. WATSON. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

IT 

MEANS 

DOLLARS 

FOR 

YOU. 



t^%^*'*'VW^V*/VWX^VWWV%^VWX/VWX^/' 



We thank our many customers 
for past favors. <& «£ *£ «$ 



We wish you joy in the 
present. «£ *£ *£ «£ «£ 



We hope for your continued 
patronage in the future. «£ <£ 



YOURS FOR BUSINESS 



Lewis Bros. & Co. 



WHOLESALE HARDWARE 



Montreal 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Success and Prosperity for 1902. 1 

MAY IT PROVE A RECORD BUSINESS YEAR FOR ALL FRIENDS AND PATRONS ! 

oxroRD r*j 

wmII Help to maki 



i* so. 



They are Twentieth Century Lines — the nearest approach to absolute perfection 
in cooking and heating apparatus that you will find. 

If you aren't familiar with our extensive variety of Oxford goods, you will find 
it pays to get acquainted with them — pays you — we are confident that we can retain 
your interest. 

THE QURNEY FOUNDRY CO., um.™ 

The Gurney-Massey Co., Limited, Montreal. ^"~ TORONTO, WINNIPEG, and VANCOUVER. 

Manufacturers of the largest and most complete line under one name in Canada. 



THE OSHAWA WIRE 
1 FENCE CO., LIMITED 



OSHAWA, ONT. 



Manufacturers of Woven Wire Fencing, 
Gates, Etc, 

Also Dealers in Galvanized Fence Wire, 

Agents Wanted. 
Send for Catalogue and Prices. 

After Stocktaking 

in the quiet time is the opportunity to equip wiih 




%** 



Bennett's Patent Shelf Box 

Write for our new discount sheets containing 
lower prices and 7 varieties in Shelf Boxes. 

J. 8. BENNETT, Patentee and Manufacturer, 

15 MARION ST., TORONTO 



IMPROVED STEEL WIRE TRACE CHAINS. 

Every chain guaranteed. Most profitable and satisfactory chain to handle. 




Improved Quality and Cheaper Prices for 1902. 

THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., limited 

HAMILTON, ONT., AND MONTREAL, QUE. 



Dundas Axes 

One customer writes : " We have found 
your Axes the best we have ever handled." 
Another writes : " Duplicate the shipment 
made us July 4th." Another says : " We 
sell the ' Crown Jewel' at $1.00 and it 
goes every time." 

DUNDAS AXE WORKS 

Dundas, Ont. 

W. L. Haldimand, Jr., Agent, Montreal. 



The Robin Hood 
Powder Company 

If you want the best Trap or Game loan in 
the world, buy " Robin Hood Smokeless," 
in " Robin Hood " Shells. It is quick, safe, 
and reliable. Try it for pattern and pene- 
tration from forty to seventy yards against 
any powder on the market. We make the 
powder, we make the shells, and we load 
them. Write for our booklet, " Powder 
Facts." 

The Robin Hood Powder 
Company - 

SWANTON, VT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



AMERICAN SCYTHES. 



Hubbard & Blake's 
and Isaiah Blood's 



Celebrated Scythes 



PRICES NO HIGHER THAN CANADIAN-QUALITY BETTER. 



If you want them and your Jobber has not got them write to us. 



Thos. C. Collins & Sons 

301 St. James St. 

MONTREAL 

SALES AGENTS FOR CANADA. 



American Axe & Tool Co. 

253 BROADWAY, 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 



LOCKS and BUILDERS' 



Made in great variety of 
design and finish. 



<v 



Catalogues and price list mailed on 

"application. ^ Ei:^ 

iiTHE LARGEST MAKERS 
IN THE DOMINION. 




The Gurney-Tilden Co., Limited, 



Hamilton, Canada. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE "PHILADELPHIA" LAWN N|OWeR. 




7y2 = inch Drive Wheels. 
4 = Knife Cylinders. 
Sizes— 10, 12, 14, 16 inches. 



KNIVES ARE TOOL STEEL, TEMPERED IN OIL 
MOWER IS MADE AND FINISHED THROUGHOUT 
TO RANK HIGHEST GRADE 



THIS MOWER IS ESPECIALLY SUITED FOR TERRACE WORK OR 
UPON LAWNS WHERE THERE ARE A LOT OF TREES OR SHRUBS. 

EVERY ONE ADJUSTED AND TESTED BEFORE LEAVING FACTORV. 

Manufactured by A. R. Woodyatt & Co., Guelph, Canada. 
Sold only through the Wholesale Trade. 



KEMP'S Broad Hoop 

Roll Rim Milk Can Bottoms 

possess all the points which go to make perfection in Can Bottoms. 
They have been used by a criticizing public for three seasons, and 
their popularity is evidence of the satisfaction which they gave. 
The Roll Rim has no sharp turns which break the grain of the 
metal and lessen its wearing qualities. It has a broad wearing 
surface and will not damage floors. They do not cost more than an 
inferior Bottom. The IRON-CLAD TRIMMINGS are made the 
same as the broad hoop, and differ from them only in having a 
narrower and thicker hoop which does not require the 
Roll Rim. and, therefore, can be sold cheaper. For 
durability and finish our trimmings are unequalled. 

Manufactured by 

KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., 

TORONTO, CANADA. 







VOL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JANUARY 4, 1902. 



NO. 



President, 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. 

THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. 

Limited. 

Publisher s of Trade Newspapers which cir- 
culate in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North- West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario , 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.B. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

orrioxa 

MONTREAL 133 McGill Street. 

Telephone 1155. 

TORONTO 10 Front Street East. 

Telephone 1701 , 

LONDON, ENQ 109 Fleet Street, E.C., 

W. H. Miln. 
MANCHESTER, ENQ. . - ■ 18 St Ann Street, 

H. S. Ashburner. 
WINNIPEG .... Western Canada Block, 

J. J. Roberts. 

VANCOUVER, B.C Flack Block, 

J. A. Macdonald, 
ST.JOHN.N.B. . . . No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White, 
NEW YORK. - Room 441 New York Life Bldg. 

Subscription, Canada and the United States $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12b. 

Published every .Saturday. 
Cable Address {^ C cr ;rt:c .nfd".: 



WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 



THEIR ADVERTISEMENT INTHISPAPER 



KILL THE BY-LAW. 

ON Monday next the ratepayers of 
Toronto will vote on the by law 
empowering the City Council to 
vote $133,500 for the purpose of erecting 
buildings for the Industrial Exhibition. 
It is well that the ratepayers should care- 
fully consider the matter. Doubtless the 
Exhibition is a good thing for the " Queen 
City." Of late, however, we know that it 
has for some years been steadily deteriorat- 
ing as an exhibition pure and simple, while 
it has been expanding as a variety show 
and a race track. As we have time and 



again pointed out, this policy has led to an 
antagonism of the manufacturing, dairying 
and mercantile interests of the country. 

While some new buildings are undoubt- 
edly needed (a main building, for instance), 
what is needed most, first of all, is a new 
policy. As the management have so far 
refused to recognize this, it is obvious a 
new management is necessary before a new 
policy can be secured. 

The ratepayers over a year ago refused 
to concur in a by-law to raise money for 
erecting new buildings, because they had 
lost faith in the administration. As the same 
administration is still in existence the rate- 
payers of Toronto should deal with this 
by-law as they did with its predecessor. 



IMPROVEMENT SOCIETIES. 

In the United States, leaders in the work 
of village improvement have sought to 
interest the teachers alone in this scheme, 
but not only should this work interest the 
teacher, it should interest the business man 
as well. 

In Danvers, Mass., a local improvement 
society with a membership of 150, most of 
whom are children, has been doing good 
work in the improvement of sidewalks, 
roads, and lawns ; the removal of old 
buildings and fences; the planting and care 
of trees ; the destroying of canker-worms 
and other insect pests ; and other good 
things generally. By means of concerts, 
lectures, and contributions generally, the 
sum of $5,000 has been realized, with which 
a large park cf 25 acres has been purchased. 
After the society has done its best at improv- 
ing the park it will throw it open to the 
public. 



It should not be impossible for business 
men in Canada to excite interest in their 
several communities on this most laudable 
movement. 



VOTE FOR BUSINESS MEN. 

ON Monday next the different muni- 
cipalities in Ontario will be called 
upon to elect their representatives 
to the local governing bodies. 

The opinion obtains among not a few 
that the quality of the representatives in 
our municipal councils has for some years 
been steadily deteriorating. It certainly 
has not been improving, for the ward 
heeler and not the practical business man is 
only too often the power that rules. If, 
however, the business men in the several 
municipalities were to be guided by the 
same principles as they are when selecting 
their own employes, the ward heeler and 
the professional politician would soon be a 
thing of the past. 

The management of a municipality is as 
much a matter of business as the manage- 
ment of a purely commercial enterprise. 
And it is because so many electors do not 
realize this — or, at any rate, do not vote as 
if they did — that we have a deterioration in 
the quality of the men who sit in our council 
chambers as our representatives. 

Like begets like. And if the business 
men of this country will exercise their 
power in the right direction it will only be a 
matter of time before our municipal institu- 
tions will become more businesslike in their 
character. 

Work for business men. Vote for busi- 
ness men. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HOW A BANK CLOSED UP A BUSINESS. 



WHEN some 20 months ago it was 
announced that The Copp Brothers 
Co., Limited, stove manufacturers, 
Hamilton, Ont., had been forced into 
liquidation a great deal of regret was 
expressed in many parts of Canada. 

Those who then expressed regret will 
now, doubtless, find matter for gratification 
in the fact that the outgoing year of .1901 
saw every creditor, direct or indirect, 
paid in full. But this is not all : in spite 
of the enormous sacrifices necessary in 
order to wind up the business so rapidly, a 
handsome surplus remains, and that with- 
out disposing of any of the company's 
property except the foundry, or without 
discounting customers' paper. 

From the very fact that .the affairs of the 
company have been so satisfactorily wound 
up, one is naturally led to examine the cir- 
cumstances which brought about the liquida- 
tion. 

As our readers are doubtless aware, the 
'direct cause of the liquidation was the 
demand of the Merchants Bank for the 
immediate payment of the sum of $37,000 
owing that concern. Why the bank should 
have made this peremptory demand is 
something we cannot understand. 

As we have already intimated, the 
demand for a settlement of the liabilities to 
the bank was made early in 1900. The 
business of the Copp Company in 1899 was 
the largest in its history. And not only 
was its paper under discount of better 
quality than at any other period during 20 
years, but it was reduced from over $44,000 
in April, 1899, to less than $24,000 in 1900, 
while during that period the business of the 
company increased by over $15,000. It 
was true that the company was at the time 
a little hard up, because of a rather extra 
heavy stock on hand, but it must, we think, 
be obvious to most people that its financial 
condition was by no means unhealthy, par- 
ticularly when we consider that the stove 
trade in Canada during the year or two 
previous to the demand of the bank being 
made was more than usually prosperous. 
Furthermore, the business of the company 
had been increasing in volume for some five 
or six years. And it has been estimated 



that, had it been allowed to continue in 
business, it would have closed 1900 with a 
profit of at least $20,000. This, in the face 
of the handsome surplus with which the 
liquidation proceedings have been con- 
cluded, certainly does not seem an exag- 
geration. 

Another feature of the affair was that only 
four or five days previous to the demand 
for payment, which was to be satisfied by 
3 p.m. of the day on which it was made, 
one of the members of the company was 
informed that the head office of the bank 
was agreeable to making the usual ad- 
vance. 

An effort was made to get accommodation 
from other banks, but, the action of the 
Merchants Bank having become known, it 
was, of course, abortive. Liquidation then 
followed. 

That the action of the bank was a mis- 
take is evident. If there was any doubt 
about the wisdom of it when the demand 
for payment was made on April 2, 1900, the 
result of the liquidation settles it beyond all 
peradventure. It was a grave mistake. 
And the Merchants Bank, no doubt, fully 
realizes it. 

In the meantime, however, an old and 
honorable firm has been forced out of busi- 
ness, for which even the satisfactory wind- 
ing up of its affairs is but poor compensa- 
tion. 

The old firm whose career was thus 
closed began business in 1848. In that 
year Messrs. Anthony and William J. Copp 
commenced a general stove and tin busi- 
ness in Hamilton, which was carried on 
successfully for a number of years. Nine 
years later, viz., in 1857, the brothers 
bought the old Vulcan Foundry of Wood- 
stock and went into the manufacture of 
stoves, the business at Hamilton also being 
continued. The Woodstock Company was 
known as Copp, Finch & Co. The Wood- 
stock business was successful but it was felt 
many advantages would be gained in con- 
solidating all under one management. 
Consequently, in the year 1864, the foundry 
was moved to Hamilton, the first heat 
being taken off on August 5 of that year. 
At first the premises consisted only of a 



three- storey ed building and moulding shop; 
to this were added from time to time various 
additions. In 1891 the old firm was incor- 
porated under the style of the Copp 
Brothers Co., Limited, with William J. 
Copp as president and Harold E. Copp as 
secretary -treasurer. 



THE "WANT BOOK." 

A correspondent writes that now would 
be a good time for retailers and general 
store keepers to commence using a want 
book in different departments of their stores. 
Some use them at present, but not in the 
right way. When a line of goods is getting 
low, the fact should be immediately noted 
in the want book. 

If a customer asks you for something you 
have not got or never heard of, don't turn 
him away, but make an effort to secure the 
article and please him. 

When a traveller calls on you and you 
have a few specials on your list, ask him if 
his firm makes the article called for, or 
where he can secure it. 

Don't keep your want book for an orna- 
ment, but use it to full advantage. As you 
order the wants, score them off or mark who 
you order from, and also the date in the 
margin. This will save a lot of confusion 
and annoyance. 

Have every clerk in the store and heads 
of departments use the order book. If any 
storekeeper has not used a want book, give 
it a trial and see for yourself the trouble 
you save your customers, clerks and the 
trade generally. Do it now. 



RAW AND BOILED OIL DOWN 4C. 1 

This week the prices of raw and boiled 
linseed oil for Ontario have been lowered 
to 77c. for the former and 80c. for the latter 
per gallon, a reduction of 4c. per gallon. 
Toronto, Hamilton and London prices are 
2c. less. 

Raw linseed is still firm, but in England 
there has lately been two kinds of oil placed 
on the market, an inferior and a better 
grade of Calcutta. The latter sells at a 
price equivalent to ours here, but the foirn^, 
threatens to come in and compete with ours 
on account of its cheapness. But the fact 
that oils have been very stagnant lately, 
little or no movement being noticeable, has 
had some weight with the paint and oil 
merchants. They therefore hope that by 
lowering the prices of oil their customers 
will be induced to place their orders early 
this season. In accordance with this they 
have marked prices down. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



# BUSINESS AND ITS MANAGEMENT ,* 



Some Ideas and Hints. 



^WwMMffMWMMMWMWWMWMMMM^MSMWWW^M^^^ 



Relation of Profit and Loss Statement 
to Balance Sheet. 

BY A. D. KITTREDGE. 

THE profit and loss statement gives 
the results of the transactions of 
the business for a fiscal period, 
and must certainly precede the balance 
sheet in order to bring into it in a single 
amount that which represents the results 
of the business. You may call this item 
undivided profits, general loss and gain,' 
or surplus, or it may be indicated by 
some other term. In any event, some- 
thing in the balance sheet stands for the 
accretion of capital during the period 
passed. The profit and loss statement 
must always precede the balance sheet in 
order to put into the latter the quantity 
which it is necessary to have in order to 
state the condition which the balance 
sheet is to show. A correct balance 
sheet must show all the assets of the 
business, and likewise all the liabilities of 
the business, and from every point of 
view, capital, whether invested direct or 
being the accumulation in the way of pro- 
fits, is an important part ol the liabili- 
ties of the business. It is a necessary ele- 
ment to make the statement balance. 

In order to produce a profit and loss 
statement, and after that to properly 
frame a balance sheet, there must be a 
proper classification of accounts or the 
sorting of accounts into classes. A mo- 
ment's consideration will show that in 
each of those divisions of the accounts of 
a business, namely, the profit and loss 
statement and balance sheet, we can have 
two classes of accounts, and only two. 
The profit and loss statement can have 
nothing but expenses, including, of 
course, losses and revenues, or earning or 
income, whichever you may prefer to call 
it. In turn, the balance sheet can con 
tain nothing but assets and liabilities. 

If we begin to make out a balance 
sheet, particularly if we allow that plan 
which has been specified by various de- 
finitions already presented, namely, from 
the books of the business and upon the 
assumption that the books have been 
conducted along the usual lines, we en- 
counter at once certain difficulties. Wc 
find certain accounts that are, in char- 
acter, straddles. For example, there is 
Vie' merchandise account, which is made 
lo perform two functions. It is an asset 
account to the extent of the goods on 
hand and a revenue account to the ex- 
tent of the profit that has followed from 
(he trading. Again, we have a straddle 
in the way in which the account called 
interest and discount is commonly con- 
ducted. It includes both expenses and 
earnings. 

If we are going to classify our accounts 
in such a way as to have them in most 
convenient form for a balance sheet, we 
must arrange them according to the re- 



quirements of these two main divisions. 
We must have in one class sufficient 
accounts to indicate all our assets, and 
in another sufficient accounts to indicate 
all our liabilities. There must be likewise 
sufficient accounts to indicate all our ex- 
penses, and also our income items or 
revenues, whatever the term may be that 
is applied to the class. 

The merchandise account to which 1 
have referred as an example of a straddle 
is certainly a greatly overworked account, 
when we take it as we find it in the 
ordinary business establishments into 
which the account is called. 

The Expenditure Proportion in 
Business. 

The proportion of expense to the total 
amount of business transacted in a year 
is often a stumbling block in the way of 





1 












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Vi 














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^g'™f i 


y I 










P 







THE LATE REAL ANGERS, 

Of Frothlngham & Workman, whose death 
was announced last week. 



an assured profit, says Stoves and Hard- 
ware Reporter. In some cases the ex- 
pense is made greater than the business 
will bear, and in others not a sufficient 
allowance is made for the moving of the 
business, with the result that extrava- 
gance on the one hand or a too careful 
saving on the other results in a loss 
which may be often past recovery. It 
has been figured out that on an average 
business of $10,000 to $12,000 a year, the 
expenses should not exceed 15 per cent., 
including the living expenses of the 
proprietor at $15 per week, and not 
allowing for clerical hire, but charging 
up insurance, rental and interest on the 
value of the stock, which represents, as 
an illustration, an investment of $3,000. 
To do a business of $12,000 on this in- 



vestment requires that the capital should 
be turned over four times a year, which 
may be possible under exceptional condi- 
tions but is hardly so when there is but 
one man in the store to attend to it. The 
above illustration has been given as an 
actual fact, but an examination of the 
figures shows that there must have been 
an unusually hard amount of work to 
accomplish such a result, and also the 
exercise of a power of saving the pennies 
that might have been used to better ad- 
vantage in looking after the dollars. It 
is a very difficult matter nowadays to 
make money without spending it in the 
effort, and while there is a waste in in- 
judicious expenditure there is also a sav- 
ing in the use of money in the right way 
for the bringing in of new business. 

Economy. 

How a man uses money — makes it, 
saves it and spends it — is, perhaps, one 
of the best tests of practical wisdom, 
remarks Pickles. Although money ought 
by no means to be regarded as a chief 
end of man's life, neither is it a trifling 
matter, representing- as it does to so 
large an extent, the means of physical 
comfort and social well-being. Some of 
the finest qualities of human nature are 
intimately related to the right use of 
money ; such as generosity, honesty and 
justice as well as economy and provi- 
dence. 

The provident and careful man must 
necessarily be a thoughtful man, for he 
lives not only for the present but makes 
arrangements for the future. He must be 
a temperate man and exercise self-denial; 
a virtue that gives strength to character. 

It is the duty of the prudent man to 
live so that in case of sickness or lack 
of employment he will suffer as little as 
possible. Viewed in this light, the hon- 
est earning and the frugal use of money 
are highly important. Though money 
represents many objects . without real 
worth, it also represents many things of 
great value ; food, clothing, personal 
self-respect and independence. Thus a 
store of savings secures a man a footing 
and enables him to wait, hopefully and 
cheerfully, until better days come round. 

To secure independence the practice of 
simple economy is all that is necessary. 
Economy requires, neither superior cour- 
age nor eminent virtue ; it is satisfied 
with ordinary energy, and the capacity of 
average minds. Economy, at the bottom, 
is but the spirit of order applied to 
domestic affairs ; it means management, 
prudence and the avoidance of waste. 
Economy teaches the lesson of careful- 
ness. The small change that many throw 
away uselessly, or worse, would often 
form a basis of fortune and indepen- 
dence. In the words .of our honored em- 
ployer, " Make all you can honestly, 
spend all you can wisely and save all 
you can prudently." 



J. B. Paquette, general merchant, 
Riviere a Pierre, Que., has had his stock 
sold at 61c. on the dollar to J. Lapointe., 
St. Charles, Bellechasse, Que. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO. ANNUAL "ROUND UP." 



"BROKEN PROMISES.'' 

Composed and Sung by H. J. Chalmers. 

Into the private office of a factory president, 
There strolled a lot of foremen, who from working 

hard were bent — 
With shaky knees, with shattered nerves, and pal- 
pitating heart, 
They listened to his little speech, which caused the 

tears to start ; 
He spoke of broken promises, and wanted to know 

why 
They made so many of them, but to keep them did 

not try. 
They straightened up their worn-out frames, and 

an endeavor made 
To soothe his ruffled feelings, as in plaintive tones 

they said : 

CHORUS. 

" To promise is so easy, 
But to keep one is so hard : 
We quite forget about them 
Though we write them on a card. 
O' please forgive us this time 
Though your feelings we have jarred, 
To promise is so easy, 
But to keep one is so hard." 



" I've listened to your tale of woe, and surely 

you'll rejoice 
To hear that I forgive you all through hearing 

Barratt's voice, 
It makes me think of "Crescent Ware," the 

medals it has won, 
And as the firm's record year has been nineteen 

ought one 
I'll promise that a million I will give to each of 

you 
If all your promises your keep in the year nineteen 

ought two." 

That promise of a million 

Seemed to strike them deaf and dumb, 

It made them lose their senses 

And their equilibrium : 

Hello ! " Up one two nine one," 

Dr. H. was called by phone. 

To cure them was quite easy, 

For at curing he's no drone. 

To some he prescribed whiskey blanc, to others 
ginger ale, 

And soon they were upon their feet, though look- 
ing very pale. 

They held a " kickers' meeting," but decided not 
to kick, 




Staff of the Trios. Davidson rianufactu ring Co. 



Their quaint appeal was made in such a quiet, 

pathetic way, 
It gave the President a shock — he nearly swooned 

away, 
And while the foremen looked for help to come 

from anywhere, 
In walked Sir Francis Barratt, he of famous 

" Crescent Ware." 
He'd heard the conversation that took place inside 

the room, 
And with " Foxy Quiller " courage, prepared to 

meet his doom : 
With tearful eyes and long-drawn sighs, he joined 

the motley throng, 
And with his Steel Enamelled voice he sadly sung 

this song : 

" To promise is so easy, 

I assure you without jest 

I very seldom break one, 

I'm not half as bad's the rest. 

]ust make to us some promise 

And then put us to the test, 

But try and make it easy, 

And you'll find we'll do our best." 

'Tis true, that music hath the charms to soothe the 

savage breast, 
For, rising up, the President, his foremen thus 

addressed : 



But prayed that to his promise the kind President 

would stick. 
" Oh! have no fear of that," quoth he, " what I 

say always goes, 
In proof of which, I have no doubt, the office staff 

well knows." 
And thus assured these foremen, from Departments 

A to Z, 
Assumed an air of wealth and fame, and this is 

what they said : 

" To promise is so easy, 

But in twelve months' time, we vow 

We'll promise to remind you 

Of the promise you make now : 

just have those millions ready 

And our jobs we will forsake — 

Our promises in future 

We like ' Crescent Ware ' wont break." 

Unequalled success attended the fifth 
annual dinner given by the directors of The ; 
Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co. to their travellers 
and heads of departments, on the evening 
of December 23, at Her Majesty's Cafe, 
Montreal. 

One would imagine that the resources for 



unique features had been exhausted, but 
the 75 guests (an increase of 10 over last 
year) were pleasantly surprised by two 
decided "hits," the first being a presenta- 
tion of a (planished tin) cup to. Mr. H. B. 
Chadburn (Maritime Provinces) for b^ing 
champion "kicker" of the "kickers'" 
party. In making the presentation, the 
president, Mr. Jas. Davidson, humorously 
stated that it was given as a mark of appre- 
ciation not only of the intrinsic value of his 
(Chadburn' s) remarks, but the force with 
which they were delivered. 

Replying, Mr. Chadburn said that, when 
taking into consideration the disappointed 
look of the fourteen other aspirants, he felt 
proud of his achievement. 

The other "hit" was a song entitled 
"Broken Promises," composed and sung 
by H. J. Chalmers, eliciting hearty laughter 
and applause as the sly hits on some mem- 
ber of the staff were comprehended. 

Mr. Jas. Davidson, in proposing the 
toast of " The King," spoke of past similar 
occasions, and said he was glad that these 
annual gatherings had come to stay and 
were conducive to a better understanding 
between employer and employe. Reviewing 
the year's business, he found that while 
1900 had been exceptionally good, the first 
year of the twentieth century had shown a 
decided increase. 

Mr. T. C. Davidson (vice-president), in 
a few well chosen remarks proposing the 
health of "Our Guests," dwelt upon the 
strides in development the business had 
had, and took the new faces as an in- 
dication of this, as the time-honored, 
familiar " old ones " were still with them. 

Taylor Webb (British Columbia), re- 
sponding, spoke of his trip to Manitoba and 
British Columbia and the opportunities that 
that country afforded to an organization 
thoroughly disciplined and equipped. 

Dr. Haldimand, of The Thos. Davidson 
Mfg. Co. Mutual Benefit Society, added 
much to the enjoyment of the evening, 
rendering several songs in his charming 
tenor voice. 

Edward Goodwill spoke feelingly of 
the " Knights of the Grip " and their 
great value to an organization s$j$ 1 
as theirs, that their training was of 
inestimable importance in enabling them 
to grasp the opportunities that the 
near future of this Canada of ours will 
afford. In welcoming Mr. Chas. S. Clarke 
(the firm's youngest traveller), he kindly 
alluded to Mr. Clarke's experiences in 
South Africa and said that men who could 
acquit themselves with honor in the battles 
for their country should also possess the 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



right material for battles in the commercial 
arena. 

Mr. M. Lachapelle's song, " La Petite," 
touched his hearers in the right spot. 

Mr. A. Bindlay, responding to the toast 
of ^' The Office Staff," caused considerable 
merriment by his lucid and graphic descrip- 
tion of a young clerk's experience in 
" walking the carpet." 

Mr. Chas. Watt, of Messrs. Blyth & 
Watt, Ottawa, an old traveller of the firm, 
wired regrets at being unable to attend, 
stating that he was too busy selling 
" Crescent" ware. 

Mr. J. N. Young proposed Mr. Watt's 
health, and requested that a telegram be 
se sent Mr. Watt mentioning the enthusiasm 
with which his health had been honored. 

Mr. Chas. P. Clarke excellently recited 
Dr. Drummond's "LeVieux Temps," which 
was greatly appreciated, especially by the 
French guests. 

The table was in the unique form of a 
horseshoe, an arrangement that facilitates 
the rendering of songs and speeches, and 
blending nicely with the general equipment 
of Her Majesty's Cafe. The invitation 
and menu cards were on tin, and were 
designed and lithographed at the firm's 
works ; the cartoons portraying the travel- 
lers and heads of departments were cleverly 
executed, while the blending of colors was 
a harmonious indication of the state of 
perfection to which this industry has 
reached. 

Messrs. J. N. and R. C. Warminton, 
Toronto, and Colin C. Brown, Rossland, 
traveller for the Kootenays, were the special 
guests of the evening. 

The toasts, songs and recitations were 
given with that willingness and good- 
fellowship that has dominated previous 
gatherings of this kind and which augments 
greatly the harmony that exists between 
employer and employe, and the directors of 
The Thos. Davidson Co. may justly feel 
proud at the happy consummation of their 

hospitality. 

Scott McKerrow. 



THE AUSTRALIAN TARIFF. 

In the opinion of Dr. W. H. Montague, 
"<toio has just returned from Australia, the 
new tariff levied by the new Commonwealth 
will greatly affect imports from Canada and 
the United States. He is very sanguine 
that a market would be found, however, for 
wheat, machinery, manufactured fabrics 
and other goods from this continent. This 
new high taiiff is one of the great political 
questions in Australia, the other being 
colored labor. 



*H 



ma 



IT STANDS 



for good paint, and is not sold in the interest of any one 
ingredient. 

We have no more interest in lead than in zinc, and no more 
in zinc than in lead. If straight lead and oil could produce the 
best paint we would make S.-W.P. that way ; or we'd make it of 
straight zinc and oil if that were the best. 

But we long ago found out, after long, practical investigation, 
that pure lead, pure zinc and pure linseed oil, combined in certain 
definite proportions, thoroughly ground and mixed by machinery, 
make better wearing paint, better covering paint, better looking 
paint and better working paint than any other. 

We don't talk 

THE SHERWIN WILLIAMS PAINT 

in the interest of any one ingredient, but in the interest of good 
paint solely. 




Sv; 




The Sherwin-Williams Co. 



CHICAGO, 
NEW YORK, 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND, 
NEWARK, BOSTON, SAN FRANCISCO. 

MONTREAL, TORONTO, KANSAS CITY. 




SILVER ANNIVERSARY. 

HARDWARE AND METAL is in re- 
ceipt of a handsome sterling silver 
paper cutter from a well-known 
veteran hardware salesman, Mr. Walter 
Grose, of Montreal, as a memento of his 
twenty-fifth year selling hardware. 

Mr. Grose has represented the well- 
known corporation, The Plume & Atwood 
Manufacturing Co., of Waterbury, Conn., 
brass and brass goods manufacturers, for a 
quarter of a century, and is considered by 
the trade an authority on this line of goods. 

He has also taken an active interest in 
the manufacturing of locks and builders' 
hardware in Canada for the past 15 years. 
He was during a portion of this time 
connected with The Peterborough Lock 
Manufacturing Co., but for some years past 
has represented The Gurney-Tilden Co., of 
Hamilton, who are now engaged in the 
manufacture of an extensive line of locks 
and knobs in a great variety of finishes, 
in addition to their large stove business. 

Mr. Grose was largely interested in The 
Globe File Manufacturing Co., Port Hope, 
for over 13 years, and was mainly instru- 
mental in disposing of this industry recently 
to The Nicholson File Co., Providence, 



R.I., who are now the largest file manufac- 
turers in the world. They have doubled 
the capacity of these works, and Port Hope 
now rejoices in having one of the most 
important industries in the Dominion. A 
large amount of money has been expended 
to make this one of the best equipped and 
most modern file manufactories on this 
continent, which will enable them to pro- 
duce about 500 doz. files daily. Mr. Grose 
has been engaged by The Nicholson File 
Co. to sell the entire output of their 
Dominion works, and he has the best 
wishes of his many friends for his future 
prosperity. 

TWO GOOD MEN. 

Mr. Theo. Korb, whom we announced 
some weeks ago to be coming to Montreal 
to take charge of Lewis Bros.' advertising 
and catalogue department, has arrived in 
Montreal and taken over his new duties. 
Mr. Korb has been identified with W. B . 
Belknap & Co., of Louisville, Ken., is a 
hustler and is enthused with the importance 
of advertising jn modern business. 

Mr. C. M. Strange, who has represented 
Lewis Bros, on the road for seven years in 
different parts of Canada, has assumed his 
new position as warehouse manager, and is 
busy these days extending the glad hand to 
his many friends who are calling upon him. 
He is one of the best known men in the 
Canadian hardware trade. 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



G 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COM- 
PROMISES. 
URNEY & CO-, general merchants, 
Acton, Ont., have assigned to 
K. J. McNabb. 

M. Lefebvre. builder, Laprairie, Que., 
has assigned. 

The estate of Joseph Heroux, contrac- 
tor, Yamachie, Que., has assigned. 

The Brampton Gas Co., Limited, has 
assigned to Robert Hiscocks, Brampton, 
Ont. 

The creditors of M. Deslauriers & Co., 
contractors, Montreal, demand an assign- 
ment. 

J as. A. Bolesby, general merchant. 
Kintore, Ont., has assigned to Archibald 
McPherson. 

The creditors of F. U. Peters, general 
merchant, Whitewater, Man., held a meet- 
ing recently. 

The assignment of The National Iron 
Works, Limited, has been transferred to 
J. P. Langley, Toronto. 

R. G. Gaucher, grocer and dry goods 
merchant, Huberdeau, Que., is offering 
25c. on the dollar cash. 

George D. D'Entremont, general mer- 
chant, Yarmouth, N.S., has assigned to 
the official assignee, and his creditors 
will meet on January 6. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DIS- 
SOLVED. 

G. A. Corriveau & Frere, lumber mer- 
chants, DTsraeli, Que., have dissolved. 

D. & G. Herrington, planing mill, etc., 
Unionville, Ont., have dissolved, and D. 
Herrington continues. 

George C. Brown, general merchant, 
Port Maitland, N.S., has admitted as 
partners Harry R. Brown and George C. 
Curry. 

Hyman Epstein and Philip Ein have 
registered as partners in a general store, 
at Louisburg, N.S., which they will con- 
duct under the name of Epstein & Ein. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

H. E. Boulaine's stock of general mer- 
chandise, Les Grandes Berferones, Que , 
has been sold. 

The stock of A. R. Dionne & Co., gen- 
eral merchants, Mille Vaches, Que., has 
been sold at 47c. on the dollar. 

The stock of A. M. Bechard, general 
merchant, Beauce Junction, Que., has 
been sold at 66£c. on the dollar. 

CHANGES. 

The Canadian \V linger Co., Toronto, 
has sold out. 

McDonald & Rivest, electricians, Mont- 
real, have registered. 

Howard Pinnell, painter, Kamloops, 
B.C., is out of business. 

Downham & Hastings, electricians, 
Montreal, have registered. 

Bert. Fogarty has registered for 
Fogarty Bros., electricians, Montreal. 

Airs. E. St. Amour has registered for 
St. Amour & Cie., roofers, De Lorimer. 
Que. 

The Durham Natural Gas and Oil Co., 
Limited, Durham, Ont., has obtained a 
charter. 

Phe Canadian Steel and "Wira Co., Lim- 
ited, Hamilton, Ont., has obtained a 
,. charter. 



Amsy Snider, blacksmith, Didsbury, 
N.W.T., has sold his business to George 
Jamieson. 

A. A. Skrenk, agricultural implement 
agent, Clinton, Ont., has removed to 
Harriston. 

Mrs. P. Denis has registered for Denis 
it Lemaire, general merchants, St. 
Cesaire, Que. 

W. H. Bingham, ' hardware merchant, 
Grand View, N.W.T., is succeeded by 
Grant & Werdenhammer. 

McPherson & Humpsherger, agricultural 
implement agents, Didsbury, N.W.T., have 
sold out to Christie & Johnston. 

W. E. Smith is successor to the store 
business of W. E. Piggott, who conducts 
a general store and a flour and feed busi- 
ness at Kingston Station, N.S. 
FIRES. 

The sawmills of Emerie Cariere, St. 
Canute, Que., have been burned. 



Alex. Sauriol, general merchant, Monte- 
bel'o, Que., was burned out. His stock 
was only partially insured. 

The office of The Ottawa Electric Rail- 
way Co., Ottawa, was damaged by fire. 
The loss is covered by insurance. 

DEATHS. 

Peter F. McCullough, of S. B»Mc- 
Clurg & Co., stove and hardware mer- 
chants, Trenton, Ont., is dead. 



GOING INTO LARGER PREMISES 

Lewis Bros., Montreal, expect to bo 
moved into their additional premises at 26 
and 28 St. Sulpice street, by February 1. 
B. & S. H. Thompson will by that time be 
settled in their large new warehouse at the 
corner of De Bresoles and St. Sulpice 
streets. 



PAST AND FUTURE 

THE PAST with us has been a prosperous and successful career of 31 years' stand- 
ing. During the time we have developed a large business and perpetuated for 
our products a lasting reputation. 

THE FUTURE will be an endeavor to surpass the achievements of past years, an en- 
deavor to enlarge the scope of our influence, and to create additional favor for 

Iver Johnson - Guns, 
Revolvers and Bicycles 

Each in its class represents the highest attainment of mechanical 
precision and completeness. They are the kind that 

Procure Public Patronage and Perpetuate Prosperity, 

IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 



New York Office— 

op Chambers Street. 



FITCHBURG, MASS. 



WE ARE THE LARGEST MAKERS OF- 



COILED SPRING WIRE 

in Canada, our output being equal to the combined output of all other 
Canadian makers." Hence we can promise better service at no higher 
prices. You are safe in placing your orders with us. 



THE FROST WIRE FENCE CO., Limited. 



WELMND, ONT. 



STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO., 

NEW BRITAIN, CONN., U.S.A. 



IMPROVED CARPENTERS' 
TOOLS- 



SOLP BY ALL HARD WARE 
DEALERS. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 




A Reputation for Delicious Dishes 

makes an invitation to dinner doubly welcome. The dessert is very im- 
portant. Nothing is more palatable in summer than delicious home- 
made ice creams and ices. The expense is only the cost of the materials, 
the labor not as great as in preparing a cake or pudding if you use a 

Peerless Iceland Freezer 

(One Motion) 

Three minutes is the freezing time — an advantage any time, but fine for 
emergencies. Patented stationary dasher is responsible for quick freezing. 
Scrapers hug sides of can and do away with all motions except one. Write 
for booklet "Ice Cream Secrets" for those who know and those who don't. 
Gives many new recipes, as well as the good old stand-bys, all easy to make. 

To Remove all Doubt : If you've never made ice cream at home, or if you have had 
enough experience with another freezer, get a Peerless Iceland from your denier, take it 
home, and if not perfectlv pleased, return it, and dealer will refund your money. If your 
dealer hasn't it. he can get it : or write us and we will see that you are supplied. Be sure 
and get a "Peerless Iceland. Easily recognized from above photograph; notice label. 

VAtfA & CO., Dept A. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

The Peerless Ice Chipper chips the ice properly, saves ice, saves time, saves your temper. 



\ 



This Ad. 



is one of a series that will appear in all the leading maga- 
zines and ladies' papers this Spring and Summer. Do you 
think it big enough to be seen ? All of your women customers take one or more ot these 
publications. Don't you want to have your store identified with the very best advertising? 
Order Peerless Iceland Freezers and Peerless Ice Chippers from your jobber early 
so that he can put you in touch with our advertising department. If yours doesn't 
handle them, see one who does, or write us and we will see that you are supplied. 

New York: 10 Warren St. DANA d CO., Cincinnati. San Francisco : 105 Front St. 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE GROWTH OF A BUSINE8S. 

IN 1 87 1. F. Wesson and Gilbert H. 
Harrington started at 18 Manchester 
street, Worcester, Mass., in a very 
small way to manufacture one style of a 
single-action revolver fitted with a shell- 
ejecting device invented and patented by 
Mr. Harrington. It is believed to have 
been the first successful device applied to 
revolvers for ejecting empty shells without 
removing the cylinder. Mr. Wesson's 
interest was bought out in 1874 by Mr. 
Harrington, who shortly afterwards formed 
a partnership with William A. Richardson 
under the firm name of Harrington & 
Richardson. The business was rapidly 
growing, and in 1876 it became necessary 
to move to more commodious quarters at 
31 Hermon street. Four years later the 
firm became sole licensees to manufacture 
in the United States double-barrel hammer- 
less shotguns under the famous Anson & 
Deeley patents. These guns ranged in 
price from $85 to $300, and, during the five 
years they were manufactured, won an 
enviable reputation for durability, sim- 
plicity, accuracy and finish. 

In 1888, the business was incorporated 
as The Harrington & Richardson Arms Co., 
since which time it has had a steady and 
healthy growth, due to the fact that the H. 
& R. revolvers are made with the same 
precision and accuracy in every part that 
would be required in constructing a fine 
watch, and hence have achieved a reputa- 
tion that is the envy of all firearms manu- 
facturers. It is a business built up on honor, 
and each revolver or gun manufactured by 
the company is made with the same care 
and the same regard to absolute safety as 
though the entire reputation of the company 
was at stake on each one. In 1893, the 
erection of the present main four storey and 
basement factory building, at the corner of 
Park avenue, Chandler and Abbott streets, 
was begun, and it was completed in the 
spring of the following year. It covered an 
area of 50 x 180 ft., affording accommoda- 
tion for the 250 men employed. A two- 
storey and basement addition, 50 x 60 ft., 
was built in 1900, and another addition, 50 
x 90 ft. in area and four storeys and base- 
ment in height, has just been completed. 
The present number of employes is over 500. 
Their catalogue now shows 157 separate 
and distinct revolvers, besides automatic 
and non-ejecting single guns in two gauges, 
with both steel and twist barrels. About 
January 1 they will also be able to supply 
these guns in 20 gauge. They manufacture 



what is without doubt the most complete 
line of firearms on the market, and the 
great demand for their revolvers and guns 
is proof of it. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. M. F. Derby, general merchant, 
Selkirk, Ont., was in Toronto this week. 
He reports an immense Christmas trade, 
and trade in general is very good in his 
district. 

Mr. F. G. Karstedt, hardware merchant, 
Flesherton, Ont., was in Toronto last week 
on business, and called on Hardware and 
Metal. He reported business booming in 
his town. 

Mr. Chas. F. Smallpeice, who for 15 
years has been connected with the whole- 
sale department of Rice Lewis & Son, 
Limited, hardware merchants, Toronto, has 
severed his connection with that firm to 
accept a position with the wholesale hard- 
ware firm of Lewis Bros. & Co., Montreal. 
Mr. Smallpeice will contine to travel over 
his old territory in Northern and North- 
western Ontario. 



TO MAKE SULPHURIC AOID. 

The extensive and valuable pyrites ore 
areas at Rowsell's Harbor, Labrador, that 
were owned by Joseph Ripey, of St. John's, 
Nfld., and others, have been secured by 
The Dominion Iron and Steel Co., who will 
immediately send a force of men and mining 
apparatus to work these deposits. The 
company will manufacture sulphuric acid 
on a large scale. 



IS RAPIDLY PROGRESSING. 

The Cape Breton Extension Railway is 
rapidly proceeding towards completion, and 
two thirds of the track between the Strait 
of Canso and St. Peter's has already been 
graded. Five miles of rails are also laid, 
while the smaller structural works, such as 
culverts, have been finished above the above 
two points. Two gangs of men are now 
engaged on the route. Another is starting 
out immediately under the direction of 
James Purvis. 



OPENED WITH AN "AT-HOME." 

On the evening of December 28, the 
new factory of The Petrie-Taylor Magnet 
Cream Separator Co., Guelph, Ont.. was 
formally opened by an enjoyable At Home. 
Over 300 guests were present, when a 
delightful musical programme was rendered 
and many speeches were made. Light 
refreshments were served and dancing was 
indulged in till the early hours of the 
morning. 



INDUSTRIAL GOSSIP. 

Those having any items of news suitable for this column 
will confer a favor by forwarding them to this office 
addressed to the Editor. 

The Ottawa Car Co., Ottawa, has just 
completed a pontoon bridge for the War 
Office, which is for use in South Africa^ 

The Carbon Creek Lumber Co., Michel, 
B.C., has just placed in working order a 
new 80 horse-power boiler obtained from 
The James Cooper Manufacturing Co., 
Rossland, B.C. The latter firm has also 
delivered a 25 horse power boiler to The 
Crow's Nest Coal Co., Fernie, B.C. 

A large refinery is being erected at the 
Black Diamond graphite mine, Brougham 
township, Renfrew county, Ont., from 
which the large block of graphite that 
formed the foundation for the statue in the 
Ontario exhibit at the Pan American was 
procured. The mill, which is to have a 
capacity of 40 tons per day, will be in 
operation inside of a couple of months. 



SYDNEY AND THE FAST LINE. 

The Sydney, C.B., Board of Trade is 
making a vigorous campaign in favor of 
making that port a calling place, if not a 
terminus of the new fast Atlantic line. It 
has sent George Dobson to Ottawa, where 
he is interviewing members cf the Govern- 
ment, inducing them to take hold of this 
project, and collecting data from the officials 
bearing on this fast line project. 



POSTAL SERVICE REFORMS. 

Many improvements are being made in 
the postal service of Newfoundland. Wm. 
Smith, secretary of the Dominion Post 
Office Department, has been in that colony 
for some time on the invitation of the local 
Government perfecting the money order ser- 
vice. Hitherto, a delay of one or two weeks 
had been necessary outside of St. John's 
before the payment of Canadian and 
foreign money orders, but under the new 
system there will be no further delay than 
exists in Canada. The system of accounis 
has also been changed. 



WIRE NAILS 



TACKS 
WIRE 



' 



Prompt Shipment'. 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 

HAMILTON, ONT. 




B.B. *X 
t \WH ITE LEAD ,'s 

V\f SGISTEAIO TPftOE HA.* 




TRADE MAPK 



enderson& Potts, 

NOVA SCOTIA PAINT & VARNISH WORKS, 

HALIFAX AND MONTREAL 

by arrangement with BRAN DRAM BROS. & CO., London, England. 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS IN CANADA 
OF THEIR REGISTERED BRANDS OF WHITE LEAD. ZINC a COLORED PAINTS. 




Cable Address -HENDERSON' 
A.B.C.Code. 



iix and \sMvn/rea/, January 2nd, 1902 



BRANDRAM'S B.B. GENUINE WHITE LEAD 
IN ANCHOR LIQUID HOUSE PAINTS. 



Dear Sir: 



The much increased demand for liquid paints during the past 
few years clearly shows that the tendency of the day is towards a 
more general use of ready mixed paints for house painting. 

We have made and sold ANCHOR BRAND LIQUID PAINTS for a 
quarter' of century, and they have always met with the commendation of 
our customers, but we are constantly studying how they can be improved, 
and have lately come to the conclusion that the one improvement 
desirable is the use of BRANDRAM'S B.B. GENUINE WHITE LEAD in their 
manufacture, and have just completed arrangements with Messrs. 
Brandram Bros. & Co. to use their lead for this purpose. 

The merits of B.B. GENUINE WHITE LEAD have long been known. 
It is, without question the best White Lead made, being unequalled for 
Whiteness, Fineness and Body, and will cover more surface than any 
other White Lead Paint. 

The introduction of this Lead into ANCHOR LIQUID PAINTS 
means the making of a ready mixed paint that is as far in advance of 
other liquid paints as B.B. GENUINE WHITE LEAD is superior to all 
other White Leads. 

We anticipate that this will make a largely increased demand 
for ANCHOR LIQUID PAINT and we wish you to co-operate with us in 
pushing the sale of it. 

Our advertising matter will be attractive and supplied 
liberally, and if you do not handle ANCHOR LIQUID PAINT, you should 
V at once apply for the exclusive agency in your town and district. 
Please write for general information as to price, terms, etc, and 
state what territory you desire. 

From this date ANCHOR LIQUID PAINTS will have a top label on 
the cans, like the one shown above, our guarantee of the highest 
quality of Liquid Paint obtainable. 

Yours truly, 



HENDERSON & POTTS 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL. 



ESTABLISHED 1874. 



HENDERSON & POTTS 

Halifax and JVIontFeal. 

" ANCHOR " WHITE LEAD AND ZINC PAINT 
" ANCHOR " COLORED PAINTS IN OIL 
"ANCHOR" LIQUID HOUSE PAINTS 

"ANCHOR" FLOOR AND ROOFING PAINTS 

"ANCHOR" VARNISHES FOR ALL PURPOSES 

"ANCHOR" LACQUERS, BLUE AND GOLD FOR CANNERS 
"ANCHOR" JAPAN AND DRYERS 

"ANCHOR" CARRIAGE GLOSS PAINTS 
"ANCHOR" PURE COLORS IN OIL 

"ANCHOR" SUPERFINE COLORS IN JAPAN 
"ANCHOR" MARBLEINE WALL TINTS 
"ANCHOR" STRAW HAT ENAMEL 
ETC., ETC., ETC. 




TRADE MARK 



Sole Manufacturers in Canada of 



^pilfi^N Brandram Bros. & Co's 



$RS.IM9W 



LONDON, ENGLAND 

B. B. 

Genuine White Lead". 



Brandram's Genuine B. B. is the BEST WHITE LEAD MADE. 

It is unequalled for whiteness, fineness and durability, and will cover more surface than 
any other White Lead Paint. 

Our prices for Brandram's White Leads for J 902 will be lower than ever before. 



SEND FOR QUOTATIONS. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



John Bowman 



HARDWARE & COAL CO. 

LONDON, ONT. 



SKATES SKATES SKATES 

We have a large stock of Skates to dispose of 
and will fill all orders promptly at closest prices. 

Cutlery Cutlery Cutlery 



Special Lines 



Special Prices 



English and German Table and Pocket 
Cutlery, Cases, Carvers, Razors, Scis- 
sors, Pen and Pocket and Table Cutlery 
in great variety. 

Special Prices 




Montreal, January ist, 1002. 

To Our Many Customers : 

We desire to express our heartiest apprecia- 
tion for their liberal patronage of the past year, 
and extend best wishes to one and all for a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year. 

THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL, CANADA. 




18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, January 3. 1902. 
HARDWARE. 

NATURALLY business has been seri- 
ously interrupted by the holiday 
and there is not much activity in 
any line. Most of the houses are busy 
getting travellers' samples ready for the 
first trips of the year. There is little 
new to report in prices. Wire nails are a 
subject of contention just now and a gen- 
eral price is conceded to be $2.60 to 
$2.65. There is but little business doing. 
The manufacturers" associations meet 
here next week. On account of easy 
primary markets, pig tin and copper 
show material declines. 

BARB WIRE.— There has been little 
doing in wire this week. The price is 
still |3 per 100 ft. f.o.b. Montreal. 

GALVANIZED WIRE.— Little attention 
has been given to galvanized wire this 
week and there is nothing 'fresh to re- 
port. We quote as follows : Nos. 
6, 7 and 8 gauge, $3.45 ; No. 9. 
$2.80; No. 10. $3.55; No. 11. $3.65; No. 
12, $2.95 : No. 13, $3.05 : No. 14, $4.05 : 
No. 15, $4.55 : No. 16, $4.80 ; No. 17, 
$5.20 ; No. 18, $5.45. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE — Featureless. 
We quote oiled and annealed as 
follows : No. 9, $2.80 ; No. 10, $2.87; No. 



but 
per 

The 



11, $2.90; No. 12, $2.95; No. 13, $3.15 
per 100 ft. f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London, St. John and Hali- 
fax. 

FINE STEEL WIRE - There is 
little doing. The discount is 17-^ 
cent. 

BRASS AND COPPER WIRE — 
demand is of a holiday nature. The dis- 
count on both copper and brass wire is 
55 and 2£ per cent. 

FENCE STAPLES — There is virtu- 
ally nothing doing. We quote $3.25 for 
blight and $3.75 for galvanized per keg 
of 100 ft. 

WIRE NAILS — Although prices are 
nominally unchanged, few transactions 
are occurring at these figures. The bulk 
of business is passing at $2.60 per keg 
and even lower figures are mentioned. 
Developments are expected next week. 
We quote as follows : $2.85 for 
small lots and $2.77£ for carlots f.o.b. 
Montreal. London, Toronto, Hamilton 
and Gananoque. 

CUT NAILS — There is an ordinary 
demand at steady prices. We quote: $2.55 
per keg for small and $2.45 for car- 
lots ; flour barrel nails, 25 per cent, dis- 
count ; coopers' nails, 30 per cent, dis- 
count. 

HORSE NAILS — Shipments are 
light this week. " C " brand is sold 



at a discount of 50 and 7^ per cent, off the 
new list. " M " brand is quoted at 60 
per cent, off old list on oval and city 
head and 66 2-3 per cent, off countersunk 
head. 

HORSESHOES — The volume of busi- 
ness that is being done is not large 
this week. We quote as follows : Iron 
shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 2 and 
larger, $3.50 ; No. 1 and smaller, $3.75 ; 
snow shoes, No. 2 and larger, $3.75 ; No. 
1 and smaller, $4 ; X L steel shoes, all 
sizes, 1 to 5, No. 2 and larger, $3.60 ; 
No. 1 and smaller, $3.85 ; feather-weight, 
all sizes, $4.85 ; toe weight, steel shoes, 
all sizes, $5.95 f.o.b. Montreal ; f.o.b. 
Hamilton, London and Guelph, 10c. 
extra. 

SCREWS — A sorting trade is being 
done at unchanged prices. The dis- 
counts are as follows : Flat head bright, 
87^ and 10 per cent, off list ; round head 
bright, 82£ and 10 per cent.; flat head 
brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round head 
brass, 75 and 10 per cent. 

BOLTS — Fair movements are reported 
for the week. Discounts are : Norway 
carriage bolts, 60 and 5 per cent. ; 
common, 55 and 5 per cent.; full square 
carriage bolts, 60 and 5 per cent.; 
machine bolts, 55 and 5 per cent. ; coach 
screws, 70 per cent. ; sleigh shoe bolts. 
70 per cent. ; blank bolts, 60 per cent. ; 
bolt ends, 60 per cent. ; plough bolts. 55 



(C 



Samson Milk Cans and Trimmings 




"Samson" Railroad or Delivery Cans and Trimmings. 
"Samson" Dairy Pail Bottoms. 




BgoY 



' n ^f^f^ iom ^S^ 




PATENTED, JULY 23. 1900 



^ 



Section of "Samson 

PATENTED, JULY 23, 1900 

The " Samson " is the strongest and ONLY ONE-PIECE bottom made. 
Has no place for dirt or sour milk to lodge — therefore the only sanitary botto 
Every bottom in each size is of an exact diameter. Being -nmri^d >i nil i ilir there can be NO variation, as in a bottom made in several pieces 
" Samson " Railroad or Delivery Cans and ' r - ; "]fTirn ' ' '"" furnished with Seamless Neck, and Seamless or Bell Cover, which, combined 
' Samson " Bottom, makes this iinn , i"" < i"n-^}ily ll r"" |, i Pii'r" - "! or Delivery Can ever placed on the Canadian market. 

The " Samson_^£i«ii^ 1'ail OcjUuiii is made the same as the " Samson " Milk Can Bottom, and therefore has all its good features. t 

A complete stock of Tinned Sheet Iron in all gauges and sizes always kept on hand. 



with the 



he MoOlary Manufacturing 

LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, AND 

" E very-thing for the Tinshop." 



ST. JOHN, N.B. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



J9 



THE PACE-HER8EY 



IRON & TUBE GO. 



-Limited 



Montreal 



Manufacturers of j 



Wrought Iron Pipe 

For Water, Gas, Steam, Oil, 
Ammonia and Machinery. 



DRAIN PIPES, 
PORTLAND CEMENTS, 
FIRE BRICKS AND CLAY 
SILICA AND MAGNESIA 
BRICKS, 

with specially prepared mortar. 

Contractors' and Founders' 
Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEw!fml 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

(he CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

y LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND "DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Enjine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
s required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



and 5 per cent. ; tire bolts, 67£ per cent.; 
stove bolts, 67-Jt per cent. To any retail- 
er an extra discount of 5 per cent, is 
allowed. Nuts, square, 3Jc. per tb. oil 
list ; hexagon nuts, 4c. per lb. oti' list. 
To all retailers an extra discount of £c. 
per lb. is allowed. 

BUILDING PAPER — As yet there has 
not been much busiziess done for spring, 
but a good trade is looked for next 
week. We quote as follows : Tar- 
red felt, 81. 7U per 100 lb.; 2-ply, 
ready roofing, 85c. per roll ; 3-ply, $1.10 
per roll ; carpet felt, $2.25 per 100 tb.; 
dry sheathing, 35c. per roll ; tar sheath- 
ing, 45c. per roll ; dry fibre, 55c. per roll; 
tarred fibre, (35c. per roll ; O.K. and I.X. 
L., 70c. per roll ; heavy straw sheathing, 
$30 per ton ; slaters' felt, 60c. per roll. 

RIVETS AND BURRS — There, is a 
fairly good trade doing. Discounts are : 
Best iron rivets, section, carriage, and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., coop- 
ers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets,, 60 and 
10 per cent. ; swedes iron burrs are 
quoted at 55 per cent, off ; copper rivets, 
35 and 5 per cent, off, and coppered iron 
rivets and burrs, in 5-tb. carton boxes, 
are quoted at 60 and 10 per cent, off 
list. 

CORDAGE — The market is firm but 
rather inactive at the moment. We 
quote as follows : Manila, 15£c; British 
Manila at 13-Jc; sisal, 12c. and lathyarn 
at lO^c. Manitoba prices are : Manila, 
16c; British Manila, 14£c; sisal, 13c. and 
lathyarn, 12c. 

SCREEN CLOTH — Business is quiet 
this week. The ruling price is $1.25 per 
100 square feet. 

POULTRY NETTING — A fair trade 
for spring is still reported. English or 
Canadian is quoted at a discount of 60 
per cent, off 2x2 mesh, 19 wire, and 55 
per cent, off 2 x 2 mesh heavier, Canadian 
list. 

HARVEST TOOLS — Values are steady 
at a discount of 70 per cent. 

FIREBRICKS — Business is quite 
active ex-store. We quote : Scotch, at 
$19 to $23.50 and English at $18.50 to 
$22.50 per 1,000. 

CEMENT — Trade now is very quiet. 
We quote : German cement, $2.30 to 
$2.40 ; English, $2.25 to $2.35 ; Belgian, 
$1.70 to $1.95 per bbl. ex-wharf, and 
American, $2.20 to $2.30 ex-cars. 
META IS. 

The feature of the metal market is the 
drop in the price of copper and tin. Pig 
lead is also somewhat weaker. 

PIG IRON — Prices are steady with a 
fair amount of business being done in 
contracts for the coming season. Prices 
are steady at $21 to $21.50 for Summer- 
lee and $18.50 to $19 for Canadian. 

BAR IRON — The demand is fairly 
well maintained for the holiday week: 
Merchants' bar is worth $1.87-^ in car- 
le ts and $1.95 in smaller quantities. 
Horseshoe is worth $2.15 to $2.20. 

BLACK SHEETS — A good number of 
small orders are again reported this 
week. We quote as follows : 28 gauge, 
$2.65 ; 26 gauge, $2.60 ; 20 to 24 gauge, 
$2.50, and 8 to 20 gauge, $2.50. 

GALVANIZED IRON — Business is as 
usual. We quote as follows : No. 
28, Queen's Head, $4.40 ; Apollo, 10£ oz. 
$4.40 ; Comet, $4.25 with 10c. extra in 
less than case lots. 

INGOT COPPER — The market is 2c. 
lower this week, dealers asking 14^c. 



Sanderson's 
TOOL STEEL 



Unequalled for Quality. 
Large Assortment in Stock. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 



CANADIAN AGENTS 



MONTREAL. 



IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pumps 



Force, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



FHE K. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 




Manufacturer!, 



Gait. Canada. 



ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 



We offer for prompt shipment 
F»ig Tin, 

L. & F. and STRAITS. 

Ingot Copper, O.O. 
F»ig Lead. 
Spelter. 
Antimony. 



Nova Scotia Steel Go. 

Limited 

NEW BLASBOW, N.8. 

Afanufacturers of 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIB 

Open Hearth Steel 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



^UJlI Elastilite Varnish is 
popular down by the 
Sea. 




ELASTILITE is doing what 
no other Varnish has ever done 
in the Maritime Provinces, 
acknowledged to be the hardest climate in 
Canada on Varnish. 
Fac-Simile Elastilite Tin. It j s DEFYING the Salt Air and the Hot 

Sun by day and Dampness by night peculiar to that part of 
Canada. 

ELASTILITE has pleased Eastern Merchants because 
it has satisfied their customers. 

Eastern Painters are delighted with it because they say 
with ELASTILITE it is easy to do good work, and it 
remains good for a remarable length of time. 

ELASTILITE is as durable as the best Foreign or Domestic 
Outside Wearing Coach Body Varnishes and is only half the 
price of either. 

Having stood the Atlantic Coast it is good enough for any 
country. Write for particulars and names of some merchants 
as references in your own district handling it. 

ELASTILITE IS ALL OVER CANADA. 
IN TINS ONLY WITH OUR BRASS SEAL. 



Manufactured only by 



Ik 



2s Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, ONT., CANADA 



LIMITED 




^ 



FRANCIS-FROST C° L 



united 



TORONTO. 

Canadian Distributing Agents for Grippin's Crack Filler. 



Straits.. 27c. is a 
3 but little doing, 
market is slightly 
is being clone at 



IKON PIPE — 

fairly heavy this 
linn. We quote 
pipe, £, §3.1)0 per 
4, $3.10 ; f, $3.45 ; 
H, §8.50 ; 2-inch, 



INGOT TIN — For 
market price. There 

PIG LEAD - The 
lower and business 
83.15 to §3.20. 

LEAD PIPE — There is no change to 
report. We quote 7c. for ordinary and 
7^c. for composition waste, with 30 per 
cent. off. 

Shipments have been 

week. The market is 

as follows : Black 

100 feet ; f , $2.95 ; 

1-inch, $5 ; 1£, 87.10 ; 

$11.35. Galvanized, 4. 

$L40 ; |, '$5 ; 1-inch, $7.15 ; 1$, $10 ; 1} 

$12 ; 2-inch. $15.95. 

TINPLATES — Business is not active 
and prices are not changed. Cokes are 
worth $3.75 to $4 and charcoals $4.25 to 
$4.50. 

CANADA PLATE — There is nothing 
new to report this week. We quote 
as follows: 52's, $2.65 to $2.70; 60's, $2.75 
to $2.80 ; 75's, $2.80 to $2.85 ; full 
polished, $3.75 and galvanized, $4.25 to 
$4.35. 

STEEL — The market is firm with 
sleigh shoe selling in rather large quant- 
ities. We quote : Sleigh shoe, $2.05 ; 
tire, $2.15 ; bar, $2 ; spring, $2.75 ; ma- 
chinery. $2.75, and toecalk, $2.60. 

SHEET STEEL — We quote : Nos. 10 
to 20, $2.50 ; 3-16, $2.50 ; £, 5-16 and |. 
$2.40. 

TOOL STEEL - Black Diamond, 8c. 
and Jessop's, 13c. 

TERNE PLATES — There is a fair in- 
quiry for terne plates. We quote $7.75 to 
58.00. 

COIL CHAIN — Probably an improve- 
ment is to be noted in th<' demand this 



week. We quote as follows: No. 
6, 124c; No. 5, 104c; No. 4, 10c: 
No. 3, 9$c; i-in., 7£c. per lb.; 5-16, 
84.80; 5-16 exact, $5.25; |, $4.25: 7-16, 
$4.05 ; i, $3.S5 ; 9-16, $3.75 ; $, $3.55 ; 
it, $3.50 : I, $3.45 ; 1-in., $3.45. In car- 
load lots an allowance of 10c. is made. 
SHEET ZINC - Is selling at $5.75 to 
§6.25. 

ANTIMONY— Quiet at 10c. 
ZINC SPELTER— Steady at 5c. 
SOLDER— We quote : Bar solder, 18c. ; 
wire solder, 20c. 

GLASS. 

The winter trade is not very brisk. 
We quote as follows : First break, 50 
feet, $2.10; second, $2.20 for 50 feet; 
first break, 100 feet, $4 ; second break, 
$4.20 : third break, $4.70, and fourth 
break, $4.95. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

The Feature of the market this week is 
a drop of 4c. per gallon in the price of 
linseed oil. This is in sympathy with 
the decline on early delivery which we 
have noted for somer time. Otherwise 
trade is without any feature this week. 
W i- quote : 

WHITE LEAD— Best brands. Govern- 
ment standard, $6 ; No. I, $5.62^ ; No. 
2. §5.25 : No. 3. $4,874, and No. 4, $4.50 
all f.o.b. Montreal. Terms, 3 per cent, 
cash or four months. 

DRY WHITE LEAD— 85.25 in casks ; 
kegs, $5.50. 

DRY WHITE ZINC - Pure dry, 6ic. ; 
No. 1, 5^c. ; in oil, pure. 7£c. ; No. 1, 
6ic. : No. 2. 5£c 

PUTTY — We quote : Bulk, in bbls.. 
$1.90 per 100 ft. ; bulk, in less quantity, 



$2.05 ; bladders, in bbls., $2.25 ; blad- 
ders, in 100 or 200 ft. kegs or boxes, 
$2.40 ; in tins, $2.55 to $2.65 ; in less 
than 100-ft. lots, $3 f.o.b. Montreal, 
Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph. Maritime Provinces, 10c. high 
er, f.o.b. St. John and Halifax. 

ORANGE MINERAL— Casks, 7c. ; 100 
ft. kegs, 7£c ; smaller quantities, 8ic. 

RED LEAD — Genuine red lead in 
casks, $4.50 ; in 100-ft. kegs, $4.75 ; less 
quantities. $5.75 per 100 ft. No. 1 red 
lead, casks, $4.25; kegs, $4.50, and 
smaller quantities, $5.50. 

LITHARGE— Ground, casks, 5c. ; less, 
5+c. ; flake litharge, casks, §5.25 ; smalls, 
$5.75 per 100 ft. 

LINSEED OIL— Raw, 75c: boiled, 78c. 
in 5 to 9 bbls., 1c less, 10 to 20 bbl. 
lots open, net cash, plus 2c. for four 
months. Delivered anywhere in Ontario 
between Montreal and Oshawa at 2c per 
gal. advance and freight allowed. 

TURPENTINE— Single bbls., 58c; 2 to 
4 bbls., 57c; 5 bbls. and over, open 
terms, the same terms as linseed oil. 

SHELLAC VARNISH — Pure white, 
$2.35 to $2.45 ; orange, $2.25 to $2.3." - - 

MIXED PAINTS— $1.20 to $1.45 per 
gal. 

CASTOR OIL— 8$ to 9i c . in wholesale 
lots, and Ac additional for small lots. 

SEAL OIL— 474 to 49c 

COD OIL— 324 to 35c 

PARIS GREEN — Petroleum barrels. 
16|c per ft.; arsenic kegs, 17c; 50 and 
100-ft. drums, 17Ac: 25-ft. drums. 18c : 
1-ft. packages, 184c; 4-ft. packages, 
204c; 1-ft. tins, 194c; 4-ft. tins, 21k. 
f.o.b. Montreal. Terms : 3 per cent. 30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



days, or four months from date of 
delivery. 

SCRAP METALS. 

The price of copper is easy. Trade is 
rather quirt on the whole. Heavy cop- 
per and wire, 13^ to 14c. per 
lt>. ; light copper, 12 to 12^c; heavy 
bra&s, 12 to 12^c.; heavy yellow, 9^c; 
ligrrt brass, 6£c; lead, 2f to 2§c. per lb.; 
zinc, 2 to 2£c; iron, No. 1, wrought, $10 
light brass, G^c; lead, 2^ to 2|c. per lb.; 
zinc, 2 to 2^c; iron, No. 1, wrought, $10 
to $15 per gross ton f.o.b. Montreal ; 
stove plate, $8 to $9 ; machinery scrap. 
$14 ; light iron, No. 2, $5 a ton ; malle 
able and steel, $4 ; rags, country, 60 to 
70c. per 100 lb.; old rubbers, 7 to 7Jc. 
per lb. 

HIDES. 

There has been no change in the hide 
market since our last report, business 
being confined to limited sales for im- 
mediate requirements. No. 1 hides are 
worth 7^c, No. 2, 6£c, No. 3, 5U-. 
Sheepskins are bringing GOc. 

MAKKkT NOIES. 

Sheepskins are 5e. higher. 

Linseed oil is le. per gallon lower. 
Wire nails are selling at a discount. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, January 3, 1902. 
HARDWARE. 

WITH the travellers in the houses 
and stock taking on the boards, 
a somewhat quiet and uneventful 
trade is all that can be expected. Quite 
a few letter orders for sorting up parcels 
have come to hand, but business through 
that medium naturally does not make up 
for what the travellers bring. A few 
changes have taken place in prices. The 
most important are advances in Stanley 
Rule and Level Company's products and 
in Champion scales. The different manu- 
facturers' associations meet in Montreal 
next week. It is expected some changes 
will be made in prices, particularly in 
wire nails. Staple products of all kinds 
are seasonably quiet, but a week or two 
hence, will, of course, see trade again in 
a normal condition. 

BARB W I RE.— Business is still practi- 
cally nil. The market is firmer in the 
United States. We quote as follows : 
f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.77^ for less than car- 
lots and $2. Go for carlots. From stock, 
Toronto, $5. 

GALVANIZED WIRE.— Prices are firmer 
in the United States. Here, trade is quiet 
and prices unchanged. We quote: Nos. G, 
Ifend 8, $3.50 to $3.85 per 100 tb., accord- 
ing to quantity ; No. 9, $2.85 to $3.15 ; 
No. 10, $3.60 to $3.95; No. 11, $3.70 to 
$4.10 ; No. 12, $3 to $3.30 ; No. 13, $3.10 
to $3.40 ; No. 14, $4.10 to $4.50; No. 15, 
$4. GO to $5.50 ; No. 16, $4.85 to $5.35. 
Nos. 6 to 9 base f.o.b. Cleveland are 
quoted at $2.52£ in less than carlots and 
12c. less for carlots of 15 tons. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.-Trade is 
quiet and featureless. We quote the net 



selling prices as follows : Nos. 6 
to 8, $2.90 ; 9, $2.80 ; 10, $2.87 ; 11, $2.90; 
12, $2.95 ; 13, $3.15 ; 14, $3.37 ; 15, $3.50, 
16, $3.65. Delivery points, Toronto., Hum 
ilton, London and Montreal, with freights 
equalized on those points. 

WIRE NAILS. -The manufacturers meet 
in Montreal next week, and there are 
some who look for a reduction in prices. 
The' Iron Trade Review of this week says 
that there has been a notable stiffening 
in the p. ice of wire nails in the States 
in sympathy with the advancing rod 
market. Base price is unchanged at $2.85 
for less than carlots, and *2.77.\ for car- 
lots. Delivery points, Toronto, Hamil 
ton. London, (Jananoque and Montreal. 

CUT NAILS.— Still dull. 'The base 
price is $2.55 per keg with 10c. allowance 
OH carlots. 

HORSE NAILS.- Very little doing. Dis- 
counts are as follows : "C" brand, oval, 
head, 50 and 7^ per cent, off new list, 
and on " M " and other brands, 50, 10 
and 5 per cent, off the old list. Counter 
sunk head 60 per cent. 

HORSESHOES.-Demand is still light. 
We quote f.o.b. Toronto as fol- 
lows ; Iron shoes, No. 2 and larger, light, 
medium and heavy, $3.60 ; snow shoes, 
$3.85 ; light steel shoes, $3.70 ; feather- 
weight (all sizes), $4.95 ; iron shoes, No. 
(all sizes), $3.85 ; snow shoes, $4 ; light 
steei shoes, $3.95 ; featherweight (all 
sizes), $4.95. 

SCREWS. — A moderate trade is being- 
done for this time of the year. The 
discounts are as follows : Flat head 
bright, 87^ and 10 per cent.; round head 
bright, 82^ and 10 per cent.; flat head 
brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round head 
brass, 75 and 10 per cent.; round head 
bronze, 65 per cent., and flat head bronze 
at 70 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. -There is a 
moderate demand. We quote : Iron 
rivets, 60 and 10 per cent.; iron burrs, 55 
per cent.; copper rivets and burrs, 25 and 
5 per cent. 

BOLTS AND NUTS— Trade is keeping 
up fairly well for this time of the year. 
We quote as follows: Carriage bolts, com- 
mon ($1 list), 55 and 5 per cent.; carriage 
bolts, full square ($2.40 list), 60 and 5 
per cent.; carriage bolts, Norway iron 
($3 list), 60 and 5 per cent.; machine 
bolts, all sizes, 55 and 5 per cent.; coach 
screws, 70 per cent. 

RULES AND LEVELS.— As noted in 
another column a new list of prices and 
discounts has been issued by 'The Stanley 
Rule and Level Co. There appears to be 
an advance of at least 10 per cent. 

SCALES.— The price of " Champjon " 
scales has been advanced about 25 per 
cent., the discount now being 55 instead 
of 65 per cent. 

ROPE.— Very little doing. Pure manila. 
lo.Jc; British manila, 13£c.j sisal, 12e. 
per It). 

CEMENT.— There is no movement in 
cement worth mentioning. Prices 

are steady. We quote as follows : 
Canadian Portland, Rathbun's " Star," 
$2.25 to §2.65; " Beaver," $2.10 to $2.50; 
"Ensign," $1.90 to $2.30; German, $3.15: 
English, $3 ; Belgian, $2.50 to $2.75 ; 
Canadian hydraulic, $1.25 to $1.50 per 
bbl. 






We have on hand a large 
stock of steel sheets for 
making 

EMBOSSED 
CEILINGS, 

etc., and are now prepared 
to make prompt shipment 
of anything required in our 
line, and shall be pleased to 
receive your orders which 
shall have our best atten- 
tion. 



The Metallic Roofing Co. 

LIMITED 

Wholesale Manufacturers 
TORONTO, CANADA 



METALS. 

Trade is keeping up fairly well in metals. 
Galvanized sheets and lead are quoted a 
little lower. 

Pig Iron — Buyers are again beginning 
to look around for their future requirements, 
and a little more business is being done. 
Prices are firm and in the United States 
Bessemer iron continues to ad vance. Locally 
the idea as to price is still #17.50 to $ 18 on 
track Toronto. 

Bar Iron — In sympathy with pig iron 
the price of bar iron naturally rules firm 
and the demand is fair. Base price gi.95 
to $2.05. Extras cut to length while rol- 
ling : 2 ft. and over, 10c. per 100 lb.; 1 ft. 
and under 2 ft., 15c; under 1 ft., 20c. ; 
over 20 ft. by special agreement, accord- 
ing to length and size. 

Steel — The strength of prices is still the 
feature of the steel market. In the United 
States there has been another advance on 
wire rods, and billets are firmer. We 
quote as follows : Merchantable cast 
steel, 9 to 15c. per lb.; drill steel, 8 
to 10c. per lb.; "BC" and "Black 
Diamond " tool steel, 10 to 1 ic. ; Jessop's, 
Morton's and Firth's tool steel, 14c; 
toe calk steel, $2.85 to $3 ; tire steel, $2.30 
to $2.50 ; sleighshoe steel, $2.10 to #2.25; 
reeled machinery steel, $3, hoop steel, 
*3-i°- 

Black Sheets — Demand is fairly active. 
We quote : Common, $3 15 for 28 gauge; 
and dead flat, $2.50 for 26 gauge. 

Canada Plates — Still going out freely. 
We quote : All dull, $3.05 ; half 
polished, $315 ; all bright, S3. 75. 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Galvanized Sheets — Demand keeps 
good. Quite a few case lots have changed 
hands. We quote as follows: "Queen's 
Head" brand at $4 60 in case lots, and 
$4.75 in less quantities. 

Tin— The demand is confined to a few 
small lots. The idea as to price is $30 per 
ton. 

Tinplates — Trade has been good, but 
prices are being shaded. The idea for coke 
plates is still $4.25 for I. C. 

Tinned Sheets — Quite a few small 
orders have been received this week. We 
quote as follows : 72 x 30, up to 24 gauge, 
7^c. ; ditto, up to 26 gauge, 8c. 

Terne Plates— Dull. We quote : I.C., 
20 x 28 gauge, at $8 50. 

Copper — Spot stocks of ingot copper are 
getting limited. Sheet copper continues 
in fair demand. We quote ingot at $16 
per 100 lb. and sheet at $23 to #25 per 
100 lb. 

Brass — Quiet. Discount is 10 per cent, 
on rod and sheet. 

Solder — Trade is still quiet. We quote : 
Half-and half, guaranteed, 19 to ic.^c; 
do., commercial, 19c; refined, i8j£c. ; 
wiping, 18c. 

Lead — Prices are 25c. lower, and business 
is good at the decline. We quote : $3 50 
to #3 75 for pig lead and $5 for bar. 

Iron Pipe — Trade is still quiet and 
prices firm. We quote : Black pipe. $5.40 
for i-inch. 

Spelter — A moderate trade is being 
done. We quote 55.50 to $6 per 100 lb. 

Zinc Sheet — Trade is quiet at $6 to 
$6.25. 

Antimony — There has been a little more 
activity during the week. We still quote 
ioj£ to lie. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

Trade in paints and oils shows a very 
pronounced quietness this week. The 
houses are preparing to send out the travel- 
lers to commence their work for the coming 
season. The large amount of building 
operations that has been going on in city 
and country indicates a most successful 
season's trade. Cash sales bave been good, 
and the retailers are more hopeful and 
ought to buy more readily. The prices of 
paris green are very firm, and already there 
are a number of inquiries for that article. 
The prices of raw and boiled linseed oil have 
been lowered 4c. per gal. Otherwise there 
has been no change. We quote : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $6. \z% ; No. 1, $5-75; No. 2. $$-37% ; 
No. 3, 55.00 ; No. 4, 54-62 '^ ; genuine 
dry white lead in casks, 55- 12^. 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb. 
55.12^; ditto, in kegs of 1 00 lb., 55. 50; No. 



1, in casks of 560 lb., 54 ; ditto, kegs of 
100 lb., 54.50. 

Litharge — Genuine, 6 to 6j£c. 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 7^ to 8c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $6 to 56.25; Lehigh, in casks, 56. 

Benzine — In barrel lots, i6j£c. per gal. ; 
less quantities, 25c. per gal. 

Paris White — 90c. to 51 per 100 lb. 

Whiting — 65c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 35c; in less 
than cases, 40c. per lb. 

Liquid Shellac — Pure orange, in bbls., 
52 25 to 52.35 ; white, 52.35 to 52.45 per 
gal. ; in less quantities, 10:. extra. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., 52.25; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, 52.40; bulk in bbls., 
51.90 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 
lb., 52.05 ; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., 52.90. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, 51.90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, 52.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, 51 .20 to 51.30 per 
gal. 

Castor Oil — English, in cases, g% to 
ioc. per lb. and 10 to io^c. for single tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 77c; 
boiled, 80c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 76c; 
boiled, 79c, delivered. To Toronto, 
Hamilton and London, 2c. less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 59c; 2 
to 4 barrels, 58c, delivered. Toronto, 
Hamilton and London ic. less. For less 
quantities than barrels, 5c. per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5-gallon packages, 
50c, and 10 gallon packages, 80c. will be 
charged. 

GLASS. 

There is still a fair trade doing in glass, 
but some of the glass merchants are run- 
ning short of the stock sizes again. 
The prices are unchanged. We quote 
as follows : Under 26 in., 54- 25 ; 26 
to 40 in., 54.65; 41 to 50 in., 55.10 ; 51 to 
60 in., 55-35; 61 to 70 in., 55.75; 
71 to 80, 56.25 ; 81 to 85, 57 ; 86 to 90, 
57 75 ; Toronto, Hamilton and London. 
Terms, 4 months, or 3 per cent. 30 days. 

OLD MATERIAL. 

The prices still continue very weak owing 
to the unsettled condition of the copper 
market. The movement is quieter. We note 
no further change in prices. We quote : 
Agricultural 60c. per cwt. ; machinery cast, 
60c. ; heavy copper, 12c. per lb. ; stove 
cast, 40c. ; No. 1 wrought, 50c. per 
100 lb. ; new light scrap copper, ioc. 
per lb.; bottoms, ioc; coil wire, 12c; 
light brass, 6c; heavy yellow brass, 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
6d. and is. Canisters. 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 



(► 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England, 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 



COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y. 

Steel Carriage and 

Wagon Jacks, 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BY JOBBERS AT MFRS. PRICES. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

' 0>~*' J ' ii '^f Largert Variety, 

Toilet, H»nd, Electric Power 

ARE THE BEST. 

Highetf Quality O rooming and 
Sheep -Shearing Machine!. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

B*NT> FOB 04TALOGUI TO 
latrliu Shearer Mfg. Co., Huhua, H.H.,E8A 





Don't Forget the Name. . . 

NEWMAN'S INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINGS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 
Will close a door against any pressure of wind. Far 
ahead of ordinary door springs, pneumatic or other- 
wise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



Oneida Community Goods 

HALTERS, COW TIES, SNAPS, etc., etc., 

in all sizes and styles. May be had of all 
jobbers throughout Canada. 

Factory— NIAGARA FALLS, OUT. 



Mackenzie Bros. 

HARDWARE 
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS, 

WINNIPEG 
MAN. 



Travellers covering Manitoba, j 
Northwest Territories and 
British Columbia. 



Correspondence Solicited. 
<_ 

" F> UL l_ rvi A l\l " 

TRODSEK or SKIRT HANGERS. 

TWO ^ SIZES 




PULLMAN SASH BALANCE CO. 
ROCHESTER, N.Y., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



23 



8c; heavy red brass, ioj£c. : scrap 
lead, 2#c. ; zinc, 2C. ; scrap rubber, 
G&'c. ; good country mixed rags, 50 to 
60c; clean dry bones, 40 to 45c. per 
100 lb. 

HIDES. SKINS AND WOOL. 

Hides and skins are quiet. Wool con- 
tinues weak. The prices quoted below are 
what are paid by buyers here on arrival : 

Hides — We quote: No. 1, green, 8c; 
No. 2 green, 7c; No. 1 green, steers, 8>£c; 
No. 2 green, steers, 7^c; cured, 8# to 
8^c 

Skins — We quote : No. 1 calfskins, 9c ; 
and No. 2, 7c; deacons (dairies) 55 to 60c. 
each; sheepskins, 65 to 75c; deerskins, 
12 j£ to 14c. per lb. 

Wool — We quote : Fleece, 13c, and 
unwashed. 7 to 8c. per lb. 

SEEDS. 

The foreign demand still drags, but local 
competition has forced upward the price of 
red clover from 15 to 20c. We quote : 
Red clover, $5 to #5.40 ; alsike, #6.50 to 
58.50, and timothy, $2.25 to $3 per bush. 

COAL. 

The situation in soft coal has become 
much worse and some of the local foundries 
will have to close down. There is plenty 
of hard coal, excepting in the nut size. 
The prices are very firm. We quote at 
international bridges : Grate, $4 75 per 
gross ton ; egg, stove and nut, $5 per gross 
ton ; soft coal, $2.50 to $3.25 in bond, 
according to grade. 

PETROLEUM. 

There is still a good trade doing. We 
quote: Pratt's Astral, i6j£ to 17c. 
in bulk (barrels, extra) ; American 
water white, 17 to I7^c in barrels ; 
Photogene, 16 j£ to 17c ; Sarnia water 
white, 16 to i6j£c in barrels; Sarnia prime 
white, 14 j4 to 15c in barrels. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Pig lead is quoted 25c per 100 lb. 
lower. 

Raw and boiled linseed oil are 4c per 
gallon lower. 

'/The price of Champion scales is about 25 
per cent, higher. 

The products of The Stanley Rule and 
Level Co. are higher. 

There have been numerous inquiries re- 
cently for paris green. 

The scarcity of soft coal and coke still 
continues, and factories here are threatened 
with a coal famine. 



KEARNEY & FOOTE BRAND 

FILES *• RASPS 



(Warranted) 




Files of the above brand are standard, and are well known for their 
excellence of cut, temper and finish, and the K. & F. Horse Rasp is one 
of the leaders in this line, and is in demand in all parts of the Domin- 
ion. These goods are stocked by the following wholesale hardware 
merchants, and may be procured from either of them at bottom prices: 



THE JAMES ROBERTSON CO., Winnipeg, Man. 
H. S. HOWLAND, SONS ft CO., Toronto, Ont. 
THE SEVBOLD ft SONS CO., Montreal, P.Q. 



HOWDEN, STARKE ft CO., Montreal, P.Q. 
T. McAVITV ft SONS, St. John, N.B. 
H. H. FULLER ft CO., Halifax, N.S. 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 



Manufacturers of 



Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs, 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 

INGERSOLL, ONT. 




GLASS- 



Art Leaded Glass. 

Plate and Window Glass 

Prismatic Glass. 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^™" All Glass required for building 

Catalogue and Prices on Application. 

THE WOOD ART GLASS CO., London, Ont. 



TRADE CHAT. 

THE St. Catharines City Council has 
passed a by-law providing for the 
purchase of a site for a new armoury. 

The question of lighting Souris, Man., by 
electricity is now under consideration. 

P. Robitaille & Fils have registered as 
wood and coal merchants at Levis, Que. 

The Beaver Asbestos Co., of Thetford 
Mines, Que., has closed down for the 
winter. 

A. O' Borne, wood and coal merchant, 
Montreal, has assigned, and his creditors 
met January 3. 

R. Whitely, of Hollin, Ont., has sold out 
his blacksmith business and has moved 
away from there. 

James Corbett, hardware merchant, 
Kingston, Ont., and his sister, Miss Corbett 



spent Chtistmas as the guest of their sister, 
Mrs. J. C. Hardy, Napanee. 

On Thursday morning, December 26, 
the stables of The People's Coal Co., on 
Walnut avenue, Toronto, were damaged by 
fire to the extent of $300 or $400. 



A CLERK GETS $1,500,000. 

A clerk in Geneva, N.Y., has fallen heir 
$1,500,000. His good luck was the result 
of good work. As a clerk he conceived it 
to be his duty to master the details of 
the business and to be industrious. A 
wealthy relative who was watching his 
career was so gratified that he remembered 
him in his will to the extent of the sum 
named. 

It is not often that industry excites the 
beneficence of millionaires to such an 
extent as this, but industry and proficiency 
are certain in the long run to earn recog- 
nition and reward. 



24 CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 

It is not simply because they are ISLAND 
CITY PAINTS that our products are so 
popular with Canadian painters and witn 
Canadian merchants-but because they are 
the best, go furthest, last longest, give best 
satisfaction. 

Are you capturing your share of the Paint trade ? If not, there's something wrong — 
Paint users cannot be satisfied with what you have been selling them, and are going else- 
where for something better. There is no necessity for this condition of affairs existing. 
Thousands of merchants in every section of Canada are doing a large and profitable trade in 

ISLAND CITY PAINTS 



Because they give entire satisfaction to their customers — they need seek no further for some- 
thing better. Half the pleasure of doing business lies in the amount of satisfaction you give 
your customers in the quality of the goods you sell. There is much pleasure and profit 
attached to selling ISLAND CITY PAINTS, because THEY ARE THE BEST. 

ISLAND CITY FLOOR PAINTS— dry hard in eight hours. 

ISLAND CITY HOUSE PAINTS— only purest and best materials used. 

ISLAND CITY PURE WHITE PAINT- 

is non-poisonous — two coats cover as much as three coats of pure lead. 

ISLAND CITY PURE WHITE LEAD- 

pure decorators' lead. 

We Make Our Dry Colors— Dry Vermilions, Dry Chrome Yellow, Golden Ochre, Dry 
French Green for Blinds, Dry Chrome Green, Dry Prussian Blue a Specialty. 

SEND FOR SAMPLE CARD SHOWING 56 COLORS. 

P. D. DODS & CO. 

Mr. J. H Morin has been appointed Managing-Partner at our Toronto Office from January 1st, 1902. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 



20 YEARS IN THE PAINT TRADE. 

P. D. Dods & Co., Montreal and Toronto, 
have been in the manfacturing business for 
over 20 years, and each recurring year 
finds them better prepared to furnish 
everything needed in the paint trade, from 
dry colors to varnishes of all kinds. Their 
capacity has been more than doubled in 
the last few years, which enables them to 
deliver goods in almost any quantity 
promptly. Owing to the increased demand 
for their goods, they decided to open a 
branch in Toronto in 1896, and it has been 
a marked success. On January 1, this 
year, they admited Mr. J. H. Morin (who 
has been connected with R. C. Jamieson & 
Co. for nearly 30 years) as a partner in their 
Toronto branch. That gentleman will 
move to Toronto at once to take charge of 
that branch. The firm will be thoroughly 
represented in Western Ontario by their 
travellers, and they consider that it will be 
an advantage to the trade to wait for their 
representatives before placing orders. 



SYDNEY BEGINS MAKING STEEL. 

On the evening of December 30, the first 
steel cast was made at the works of the 
Dominion Iron and Steel Co., Sydney, 
C.B., in the presence of a number of the 
chief officials of the company, when about 
50 tons of steel were turned out from 
No. 10, open-hearth furnace. This is the 
telegram sent the directors that night by 
General- Manager Moxham : 

" Poured first lot of steel at 8 o'clock 
to night. Everything worked well. Steel 
made by ordinary pig and scrap process, 
60 per cent. Belle Island pig and 40 per 
cent, scrap. Quality of steel is excellent." 

Their blooming mill will be finished in a 
week or so, which will enable them to 
convert the ingots into billets. 

CONDENSED OR " WANT " 
ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a word 
each insertion ; cash in advance. Letters, figures, 
and abbreviations each count as one word in estimat- 
ing cost. 



FOR SALE. 



STOCK OF HARDWARE IN A HEALTHY, 
growing town in one of the best farming sec- 
tions of Nova Scotia. Every facility for doing a 
<M ! , and increasing business. Apply Hardware 
J/ Metal, Box 74. (4) 



WANTED. 



BY A WINNIPEG WHOLESALE HARD- 
ware firm, two first-class Hardware Clerks. 
Must have a thorough knowledge of hardware in 
all departments. Address applications, stating age, 
experience, references, married or single, etc., 
Drawer 1475, Winnipeg. (i-tf-) 

BUSINESS CHANCE, 



R. BAILEY & SON 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

STOVE LININGS L°„ r d "&.•„•.! 

All kinds of Fire Brick and Fire Clay Work, 

Paving Tile, etc. 

Wholesale Only. - - Write for particulars. 

1220 Yonge Street. TORONTO. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British .and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishingto be representedin Canada. 




Will Hold Dp a Shelf ! 



That's what a nbelf bracket la for. 

For thia purpose there can be 

NOTHING BETTER 

NOTHING CHEAPER 

thnii the .... 

BRADLEY STEEL SHELF BRACKfiT 

It is well Japanned, Strong and Light. 

The paving in freight is a good profit, aside 
from the lower price at which the goods are sold. 
8®" Order director through your jobber. 
ATLAS MFO. CO., New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 



PERSONS addressing advertisers 
will kindly mention having 
seen their advertisement in 
Canadian Hardware and Metal 
Merchant. 



FOR THE BATHROOM 



ORIENTAL TRADE.— Manufacturers desiring to 
have goods placed in China and Japan, address 
"ORIENTAL," Canadian Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. (0 



f f f f f 'TTf TTTTTTTfTTTf TTTTTf T?f f ? 



Bathroom 



Or- 



Household 
Scale. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

This scale is iron and brass through- 
out ; nickle-plated sliding poise 
beam : with or without measuring 
rod. 

Finished in Pale Blue, 
White and Gold, or 
Imitation Oak. 

AN IDEAL SCALE FOR HOME USE. 



Send for Prices and 
Catalogues. 




THE FAIRBANKS COMPANY 



749 Craig Street, 



MONTREAL. 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING and PLUMBING 



SOME BUILDING NOTES. 

At Chatham, X.B.. a new schodlhouse 
has jusl been completed from plans pre- 
pared by K. C. John Dunn, of Halifax. 
John McDonald, of Chatham, was the 
contractor. The building is of freestone, 
76 x Id I feet, two and one-half storeys 
high, with a basement. There are three 
entrances to the main building, which 
contains 10 class rooms, nearly all of 
which are 25 x 32 feet, besides cloak 
rooms and an assembly hall, 31 x 51 feet. 
The total cost of the building is $43,000. 

A new church is being erected at Con- 
cessions, N.S. 

H. C. Mantz has erected a new dwelling 
in Goodlands, Man. 

The brick work has I n commenced on 

the Arthur Hotel, Port Arthur. 

At Waterford, Out., tenders have been 
taken for the erection of a new hotel. 

Morlock Bros.. Guelph, Out., will imme- 
diately rebuild their upholstery factory. 

The new brick residence of* Thos. Vicker- 
man. Speedsville, Ont., is being plastered. 

A. Sweet & Co., Winchester, Ont., will 
build a new addition to their store next 
spring. 

A project for the building of a new 
flour mill, at St. Marys, Ont., is under 
consideration. 

The new High School at Victoria, B.C.. 
is nearly completed, being now ready for 
the lathers and plasterers, 

M. Uonohue has obtained permission to 
erect two brick veneered cottages on Well- 
ington street, London. Ont. 

Thos. Cutteral, builder, has been award 
ed the contract for extensive alterations 
to the Dallas Hotel. Vancouver'. 

C Bishop, of Victoria, B.C., has re 
ceived the contract for the building of a 
large new hotel, at San Juan, B.C. 

Dalton & Everleigh, architects, have 
received tenders for the new boiler house 
for The British Columbian Electric Bail 
way Co. 

George Snider has secured the contract 
for the erection of a new brick store 
house at the naval yard at Esquimalt, 
B.C., to cost about 39,000. 

Early next spring work will be com- 
menced on the new building which is to 
be erected in connection with St. 
Michael's College, St. Joseph street, To 
ronto. The new structure will cost be 
tween 875,000 and $100,000. 

The Guardian Fire and Life Assurance 
Company, Limited, have secured the 
vacant lot belonging to the Barrow es- 
tate, on St. James street, Montreal, and 
will commence a new eight-storey build 
ing next spring on that site. The pro- 
perty has a frontage of 68} feet and a 
depth of 80 feet. 



BUILDING IN MOOSE JAW. 

Building operations in and around the 
town of Moose Jaw. N.W.T., although 
not so brisk as in the last two years, 
when over $1,000,00(1 were spent in build- 
ings and improvements, yet show very 
substantial progress for the last year. A 



very conservative estimate places the 
aggregate amount of improvements and 
new buildings at between $500,000 and 
$750,000. 

The most important structure con; 
meneed this season is the new Presbyter- 
ian church, which will cost about $15. (ion 
when completed. The building is 75 x 71 
feet, and will seat comfortably 000 souls 
when readv for occupation in the coming 
spring. Operations were commenced, last 
May and the edifice is now under roof. 
Besides this, the Roman Catholics have 
built a church at a cost of $3,000. A 
large number of new schoolhouses have 
I n built throughout the district. 



BEST BUILDING YEAR SINCE 1891. 

In the year 1901 there were building- 
permits issued in Toronto representing a 
value of $3,518,883. 678 permits wee 
iSBued in 1900, having a value of $1,903,- 
136. In 1899, 710 permits were issued for 
buildings worth $2,010,446. The million- 
dollar hotel accounts for this startling 
total. which is the largest since I SO I . 
when the permits for the new city hall 
brought the values up to $4,000,000. 

The $3,518,883 is divided as follows . 
51:', brick houses, valued al $1,421,000; 
95 alterations to brick houses. S ( .lO.I7s . 
03 roughcast houses. $78,775 ; 5 altera 
lions to roughcast houses, 812.000 ; 30 
stables and sheds. $39,040; 20 stores and 
offices, ss<),||0; 43 alterations to stores 
and offices, $1 10.075 ; theatre alterations. 
$3,500; brewery alterations. $4,000; 8 
summer residences. $6,375: two hospital 
alterations. $8,000 ; 2 alterations to 
banks. $29,000 ; 5 alterations to churches. 
$40,850 : 21 warehouses. $135,200; 8 
hotels. $1,048,900; 26 factories. $207,605; 
II alterations to factories, $63,175 : 
alterations to schools. 810.500 ; altera 
tions to colleges. 857.000 ; city buildings. 
sp. i. 500. 



BUILDING IN ST. JOHN, N B. ^ 

In St. John. N.B.. the value of build- 
ings constructed during 1001 is estimated 
at $130,000, as compared with 8203,000 
for the year 1900. This is a decrease of 
$73,000, and is attributed to the fact 
that the building of manufactories has 
been rather small and that the designs in 
dwelling houses has been moderate, chief- 
ly of the two-storey wooden type. 

NEW PLUMBING PLANT STARTED. 

On Christmas Day the new auxiliary; 
pumping plant at Ottawa, which cost 
that city $95,000, was set in motion for 
the first time in the presence of about 100 
citizens. This new plant has a capacity 
of 8,000,000 gallons of wa*,er a day. anil 
is very complete. The new pumps were 
made bv The Ker Engine Works, of 
Walkerville, Ont.. and cost 822,000. The 
shafting and turbines cost $6,700, and 
were constructed by The Jenckes Machine 
Co., of Sherbrooke, Que. Holdbrook and 
Sutherland were the builders of the sta- 
tion and its foundation, which cost near- 
ly $67,000, the balance. The details in 
connection with the above were drawn 
up by W. J.. Cranston, assistant city 
engineer for Ottawa, while N. J. Ken- 
attended to the construction. 



TORONTO BUILDING PERMITS^ 

For the last week of the year building 
permits have been issued from the To- 
ronto City Commissioner's office, to 
James Paul, for a two-storey brick dwell- 
ing on Robert street, to cost 82,100 : to 
O. R. Dennick, for a two storey and 
attic detached brick dwelling, at 208 St. 
George stieet, for 80.000; to the City- 
Corporation, for a brick chimney stack 
at the western crematory on Srachan 
avenue, for 82.000 ; to J. McMullen. for a 
tvvo-storev and attic brick residence, on 
Murray street, for $2,500 ; to The Battle 
Creek Pure Food Co.. to erect a one- 
storey brick addition to their boiler 
house on the corner of M-owat avenue and 
King street, to cost 8100 ; and to Chris- 
tie. Brown & Co., Limited, to erect a 
live-storey brick and stone warehouse on 
the corner of Duke and George streets, 
for S50.000. 



WINNIPEG'S GROWTH. 

In the year 1901 the amount spent in 
buildings at Winnipeg was $1,587,227. 

And in 1000. buildings valued at SI .350. 
OO0 were constructed. This shows an in- 
crease of 8237.000 for this year. The 
principal buildings constructed were the 
Alexandria block, valued at 852.000 ; the 
sheds of The Electric Street Railway Co.. 
costing 850.000 : the addition to the Bank 
of Hamilton, costing 835.000. and J. Les- 
lie's furniture store, valued at 825,000. 



MONTREAL PLUMBERS ELECT 
OFFICERS 

The Master Plumbers' Association, of 
Montreal, held their annual meeting in 
the rooms of the Liberal Contractors' 
Club, recently, St. James street. The 'at- 
tendance was large. The annual rep&rts 
were lead and then the election of offi- 
cers was proceeded with. The following 
were elected for 1902 : 

Hon. President— John Date. 

President — Thomas Moll. 

First Vice-President— Thomas O'Connell. 

Second Vice-President — Joseph Thibault. 

Third Vice-President— W. G. Graham. 

Secretary — J. A. Gordon. 

Financial Secretary— J. C. Brunet. 

Treasurer — Captain Giroux. 

English Corresponding Secretary — I.W.Hughes. 

Frencli Corresponding Secretary — Aid. Joseph 
[iLamarche. 

Chairmen of Committees — Sanitary. P. C. Ogilvie; 
[audit, J. A. Watson; apprenticeship, P. J. Carroll. 



PLUMBING AND 



HEATING NO'V* 



Dawson k Blackwood have opened a 
plumbing shop at Fort William, Out. 

Mrs. J. H. Yorkston, of 250 Brunswick 
avenue, was sued for a plumber's bill of 
81.75. which F: McLeod had against her. 
The denial of her being made liable for 
it was contradicted by two witnesses, 
who swore flatly that she had said. " If 

\[ the landlord doesn't pay for it, I will," 
in their presence. The court ruled that 
she should pay the bill, and then may 

{■' sue the landlord to recover the money. 



K 



^ 0^n^ CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



27 



PAINT 
DEMON- 
STRATION 




A demonstration that will 
pay in the Paint business cin 
be made any day wiih a pu'e 
honest Paint — it can't be 
made with a cheap Paint, 
and it's a mistake tj try. 
Mixed Paints are here in 
earnest. Are you in line on 
a Paint that will retain your 
business ? 



RAMSAYS 
PAINTS 



will enable any dealer to 
obtain more business and 
hold what he has — they are 
made for that purpose. They 
are profitable Paints to dealer 
and user — the best made, at 
a fair price. Will you take 
hold of them ? We will help 
you to success. Write us. 



A. RAMSAY & SON 

MONTREAL 



Est'd 1842 



PAINT MAKERS 



BUTLER'S 



FAMOUS 



Sheffield Cutlery 



Fish and Dessert Knives ; Spoons and Forks ; 
Cabinets and Cases of Cutlery and Plate. 



**UITTI ED" was registered as a 

DU 1 LCR Trade Mark, A.D. 1768. 



Sole Makers of the celebrated 

♦'KEEN" Razors, "CAVENDISH" 

brand of Table Knives and Carvers. 



HIGHEST AWARDS. 



SPECIAL MENTION. 



—Full Line of Samples and stock at— 

George Butler & Co.'s 

showroom: 62 HOLBORN VIADUCT, EX. 

(Over Snow Hill Station.^ 
MANUFACTORY : 

Trinity Works, SHEFFIELD, ENG. 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from, and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject." 

CANADIAN PRESS CUPPING BUREAU, 

232 McGill Street, MONTREAL, QUE. 
Telephone Main 1255. 
10 Front St. East, Toronto. Telephone 2701. 



DIAMOND EXTENSION FRONT GRATE. 

Ends Slide in Dovetails similar to 
Diamond Stove Back. 

Diamond 

Adjustable Cook 

Stove Damper 




For Sale by Jobbers of Hardware. 



Manufactured by THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
" A. H. WOODY ATT & CO., Guelpb, Ontario. 






INI 

nd PIPE 

PIPE FITTINGS 

For HEATING and LIGHTING. 

Special fittings made to order. 

The James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co. 

TORONTO. "MIXED. 

Engineers' and Plumbers' Supplies. 



<4?- vht 







E. B. SALYERDS 

Manufacturer of 

Hockey Sticks 



PRUSTPN, 



Ontario. 



Canada. 



The Best S*ck. 

Made of B' ck Elm ' 

Wholesa 3 Trade Only Supplied. 

Ask yf r Wholesale House for 
the Pre» ,on make of Stick. 
Write «r Prioes. 



/ 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CURIOUS MISTAKES. 

SOME very curious and even comical 
mistakes are made sometimes by 
people who would not ordinarily 
be supposed likely to fall into such 
errors. A story was recently published 
about a farmer who ordered some repairs 
lor a mower. When they did not arrive 
at ih'' expected time he wrote to the 
dealt.'!- inquiring about them, receiving 
the reply that they had been shipped on 
a certain date. Inquiry resulted in the 
discovery that the dealer had made a 
slight mistake and had shipped the goods 
to himself. But this was not all. The 
customer obtained the repairs after con- 
siderable delay, and in order to impress 
the dealer with the value of being on 
time he mailed him a check for the 
amount of the bill, but made a mistake 
on his own account by making the check 
payable to himself and signing it with 
the dealer's name. This comedy of errors 
is abotit on a par with a story told by 
a hardware dealer from Texas who was in 
St. Louis last week. A regular customer 
walked into the store one day and bought 
a bill of goods amounting to a consider- 
able sum. 

" Do you wish to pay* cash for the 
bill V " asked the dealer. 

" No ; I'll settle in tin; regular way." 

" Rut your last bill hasn't been paid 
yet ." 

" I know it has. It was paid Over a 
month ago and I'm: got the receipt in 
my pocket." 

After considerable search he produced. 
not. a receipt, but a post office money 
order for the amount of the bill and 
which he had supposed was actually a 
receipt, not knowing that the payee must 
have the order before he can obtain the 
money. It seems that he had never had 
any experience with remitting money 
through Uncle Sam's bank and thought 
that payment to the postmaster was 
equivalent to paying his creditor. He 
got the asked for credit, together with an 
explanation of post office methods. — 
Stoves and Hardware Reporter. 



NUMBER OF DEER KILLED. 

The number of deer-hunting licenses 
issued this year in Ontario is estimated 
at 5,000, complete returns not yet having 
come to hand. At the moderate allow- 
ance of 1£ to each hunter, this would 
mean that 7,500 deer were killed. The 
Canadian Express Co. carried alone 
2.372, an increase of 878 over last year. 
Taking into account the number killed by 
settlers, Indians and half-breeds, and by 
'hose hunters who did not have to ex- 
press them to their homes, there could 
not Wne been less than 8,000 or 9,000 
deer kirkd this season. 



or; -lia as a summer resort. 

\ 

The ( lillj. Board of Trade is already 
preparing t\i its summer work of exten- 
sively adverting that town as a pleas- 
ant and attractive summer resort. The 
Grand Trunk l\ilway will get out 15,000 
of their Orillia \, 1( j Couchiching folders, 
through the eft'ortV n f tne board. Besides, 
5,000 guide books V r Orillia have been 
contracted for wll \ Desbarats & Co., 
of Montreal, and th\ usua l space in 
Smily's Summer ResoA Guide, has been 
taken. Altogether thei\\jn be distribut- 



ed over 20,000 beautifully illustrated 
booklets, attractively gotten up, dealing 
exclusively with the natural advantages 
for tourists and others offered by Orilla 
and the surrounding district, The usual 
amount of newspaper advertising will 
also be done. 



NEW LIST ON RULES, LEVELS, ETC- 

Till'] Stanley Rule and Level Com- 
pany. New Britain. Conn., have 
issued a new list of prices and 
discounts to the hardware trade. The 
list price on boxwood rides has been en- 
tirely revised and the coming year will 
be subject in ci base discount of (id per 
cent, in place of the base discount of 75 
per cent, in use the past year. 

The list price of those wooden plumbs 
and levels, which last year were subject 
(o a base discount of 70 per cent., has 
been revised, and the new list takes a 
base discount of 40 per cent. The same 
applies to the- list prices of common 

pocket levels. 

The list prices of rosewood handled 

T bevels No. 25 and rosewood handled 
try squares NO. 20, heretofore subject to 
a base discount of 60 per cent., has been 
revised, and the new list takes a base 
discount of 33 1-.'! per cent. 

A great number of the standard Bailey 
and Stanley planes, both iron and wood. 
have been regrouped and new lists issued 
subject to base discounts of 20 or 25 per 
cent, instead of the former lists subject 
to a base discount of 50 per cent. 



A GOOD CUTLERY TRADE. 

Mr. G J. Crowdy, of James Hutton & 
Co., Montreal, representatives in Canada of 
Joseph Rodgers & Sons, Limited, Sheffield, 
was in Toronto a few days ago. He reports 
hat business has been excellent, the only 
difficulty being inability to get orders for 
cutlery filled fast enough to supply the 
demand. 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

THE SECOND OF A SERIES. 

M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co., 
Toronto, have hit upon the happy idea of 
issuing calendars, which may be termed 
companions of those of preceding years. 
Last year the calendar showed an interest- 
ing old-time coaching scene. This year's 
calendar shows a modern tandem turnout 
with an attractive young lady sitting in the 
driver's seat with a natty little footman at 
her side. This year's, as well as last year's 
calendar, is in natural colors. The issue is 
being rapidly exhausted, but there are still 
a few on hand, which will be sent out to the 
trade on application. 



Alex. Hunter has returned to Neepawa, 
Man., where he will resume his former 
position in R. H. Hamilton's hardware 
store. During the summer he was in 
charge of a hardware store in York ton, 
N.W.T. 



NEW YEAR'S DAY 

WEDNESDAY, 1st JANUARY, 1902 



= 

The Directors and Officers of The 
Canada Paint Company, Limited, desire 
to send this word of good will to their 
constituents in Canada and abroad on 
entering upon a New Year's business. 

A WOFd of thanks for confidence and 
support in 1901, which has been the most 
important in our history. 

Of explanation, that owing to the 
prevailing strife in Linseed Oil, the 
handling of Paints and Varnishes must 
be less profitable to maker and distributor 
until the laws of supply and demand 
assert themselves, which we hope will 
soon be realized. 

Of expectation, for the business out- 
look of 1902 is the most promising in all 
Canada's history. We venture to hope 
that our Canadian clients will anticipate 
a large business, and provide for it early. 

On preparation. — For the new sea- 
son, and to avoid all possible delays, we 
commenced on 3rd December, at full 
SpriDg speed in all departments, the pre- 
paration of stock. We will thereby have 
in readiness 150,000 to 200,000 tins pre- 
pared and filled, in excess of anything 
attempted in previous winters. 

On representation.— We have re- 
vised the districts, and added, where 
necessary, to our travelling staff, in order 
to have our home clients called upon 
more regularly than during last season. 
Our technical staff is also at the disposal 
of our friends in any matter connected 
with their several departments. 

New features — There are several. 
Our 1902 Catalogue will be mailed in 
January to every name on our books, and 
it will be found worthy of careful nnrt 
constant perusal. * 

With every good wish for 1902, 

THE CANADA 
PAINT COMPANY, 

LIMITED. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



2«) 




30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MODERN CONSOLIDATIONS EXPLAINED BY 

MR. SCHWAB. 



CHAS. M. SCHWAB, President of 
The United States Steel Corpo- 
ration, was the chief speaker at 
the banquet of The Bankers' Club of 
Chicago, on the evening of December 21. 
His address, as reported in the Chicago 
dailies, is as follows i 

"' 1 notice that 1 am down on this card 
to respond to the toast, ' The Natural 
Growth of Business Enterprises ; the 
Consolidations Thereof.' } have been 
thinking a little about this and had some 
notes prepared to speak on the subject of 
consolidations here in Chicago, but when 
1 picked up the evening paper 1 saw two 
things that particularly struck me. The 
first was that the colleges in this vicin- 
ity had combined— Presbyterian colleges, 
I think. 

" Could there be a stronger argument 
as to the good that comes of consolida- 
tion than that these staid college profess- 
ors, with all their thought, had decided 
that it was to their advantage to com 
bine, their colleges '! What were they 
going to combine lor ? They were not 
going to combine for the purpose of mak- 
ing education more expensive to the stu- 
dents, that is evident. But they wen.' 
going to combine for mutual protection 
and information and good. 

" Now, that is just the basis on which 
great business enterprises have consolidat- 
ed. The trust of old is a mistaken idea. 
The consolidation of to-day is the proper 
policy. It has been borne out in every 
thing, even in Genesis, and so on down. 
The rivers combine to make the great 
seas ; tin' trees combine to make the 
forests. Combinations have gone on in 
nature forever, and they will go on in 
politics and business. 

CONSOLIDATION IS NATURAL. 

" You might just as well try to dam 
the Mississippi or sweep back tin; tides a- 

to stop the natural consolidation of busi- 
ness interests. You may regulate the 
commerce of the' .Mississippi as you will, 
and I think its course ought to be regu 
lated by wise and judicious legislation, 
but you cannot slop it. It will go on in 
spile of everything. 

" Now, the old-trust idea was just as 
fallacious as anything could well be. In 
the first place, it was founded upon the 
principle of restricting the output or in- 
Creasing the prices or in some other art! 
lieial way regulating the business. Thai 
is doomed to failure. 

"The proper business consolidation is 
one that is formed with exactly opposite 
views. It is formed with the view of en 
couraging trade, of enlarging trade, and. 
above all. of cheapening the production 
of the article of which it becomes the 
manufacturer, and in that way increasin; 
the trade. 

' Now. it is difficult for me to exem- 
plify this without pointing to some in- 
stances, and naturally I am apt to select 
that instance with which I am most 
familiar. I am not goine; to talk stuck, 
"i \ alues. You couldn't eel me to do 
I hi.il. Hut I hope you will pardon me if 
I refer to an industry with which 1 tun 
connected. I only refer to it because I 
tun most familiar with it and because I 



think it typically represents the idea of 
the greal consolidations. 

SAYS SThLL IS KING. 

The great steel industry of this coun- 
try is now first of all. A few years ago 
cotton was king. King Cotton is now 
dethroned and King Steel has taken his 
place. The steel industry last year, to 
the Ijest of my knowledge, exceeded the 
cot ion industry by more than Slllil.ii,, 
000, ami this year it is our belief that 
i he steel industry will exceed the cotton 
industry by more than 1250,000,000, so 
that 1 think steel is justly entitled L" be 
throned and crowned. 

The advantages 1 will very briefly 
refer to as showing you an ideal con 
solidation. These great steel companies 
were not put together with the view of 
avoiding competition, because, except in 
very rare instances, they were engaged in 
different lines of business. But they were 
put together for the purpose of cheapen- 
ing and strengthening the steel products 
and developing the interests of this 
country. 

In the great northwest, where we 
have till those ore mines, each individual 
company could not own the particular 
mine that would enable them to make the 
best mixture for the respective "qualities 
of iron and steel, bu'1 by consolidation of 
all these interests it was possible to 
group these mines as one, to take the 
ores from the various mines to the works 
best suited to make the ideal mixture, to 
do it at the least cost and to produce 
tiie best article. 

So in transportation. Instead of a 
small fleet, whose steamers would have to 
watt at the docks for loading and un- 
loading, as suited their respective owners' 
works, they now come down in rotation. 
They are Loaded and their cargoes are 
noi assigned to (he various works until 
after they are well down on the lakes. 
Now, anyone familiar with the shipping 
industry will appreciate at once the great 
savin" in economy in such a method of 
operation. 

So now i he mills thai formerly made 

a do/en products run COntinuouslj on 

one. The result of that is cheapening the 
product in every line, of making the steel 
available for many purposes for which it 
is not available at present, and the idea 
of business consolidation litis been 
reached. 

Now, to come to the second part of 
my remarks, and that is this: The two 
things about The lulled Stales Steel 
Corporation that seemed to be best 
known and most generally discussed 
were, first, their capitalization. and, 
second, the salary of their President. Of 
the firsl of these I am not afraid to 
speak. Of the second, I am a little like 
our Hebrew friend in New York, who. 
when asked what he would do for 810,000 
said he was ashamed to tell. 

OWE DUTY TO THE PUJBUC. 

"Now, these exeat consolidations owe a 
duty to the public. I am in hearty sym- 
pathy with President Roosevelt when he 
says that publicity is the thing that we 
require in all things pertaining to great 
industries. I second that proposition 
most heartily. The great combinations of 



capital that are not formed on a basis 
that will permit of a publication of their 
all airs are founded on an erroneous as- 
sumption, and I am not with them. 

There are many other advantages to 
the public in these great consolidations. 
I he steadiness of business and the con- 
trol largely of business within their 
power, will be well understood by ( \e 
gentlemen here if they stop to reflect c .ie 
moment upon present business condi- 
tions. 

"In years gone by if you have looked at 
a diagram of fluctuations in prices you 
have found it a series of valleys and 
peaks. These great consolidations will 
keep that on a level. To-day the de- 
mands for steel are so great that an in- 
dividual concern would undoubtedly have 
put the price 20, 30 or even 40 per cent, 
higher than it is to-day. What would 
have been the result '! People with enter- 
prises in their mind would have hesitated 
and would have said : ' Wait, we will buy 
it a little cheaper later on.' 

PAINTS A DARK PICTURE. 

" What would have been the result of 
that ? Construction would have been 
stopped. Builders would have waited for 
lower prices; railroads would not have 
extended until they could have done bet- 
ter ; but now we believe we are getting 
the confidence of the public in that re- 
spect. The result will be that building 
will go on. Railroads will be built and 
business generally will be on a more per- 
manent and level basis. 

Now, 1 am the most enthusiastic man 
in the world upon the future of American 
industries. 1 believe that we are on the 
very threshold — I don't believe that we 
have reached the summit by any manner 
of means, 

" 1 first became identified with the steel 
industry in the year 1879, and I remem- 
ber very well that we prided ourselves — 
the whole United States — upon having 
produced about 600,000 tons of steel, [a 
the year 1895 there wen.' produced about 
li,O0U,00U tons of steel, and in this year 
just ending, as nearly as we can estim- 
ate, there will be produced about 15,000,- 
HIIIJ tons of steel in the United States. 

Now. I come to the last and most 
important part of my subject, and that 
is the relation of these meat consolida- 
tions to labor. That is the subject that 
is nearest my heart, it is the subject of 
most importance to the welfare of this 
greal I nited States. 

COMPARES TWO NATIONS' LABOR. 

" I sec some of my good English 
friends here present. I had intended to 
modify somewhat what 1 was going to 
say in that respect, but 1 know they 
will be glad to hear it. 1 was asked by 
The Hritish Iron and Steel Institute a 
short time ago to tell them why the 
English steel industry did not compare 
with the American. 

' There are two reasons, I told their.. 
The first is that the attitude of yonl 
labor in England will never permit you 
to run your mills and factories as we do 
in America. 

" You will be surprised when I tell you 
that a careful survey of the whole field 
would seem to show these facts, that the 
English laborer receives on an average 
less than one-half of what the American 
receives year in and year out ; that not- 
withstanding that fact the costs, which 
I have been able to compare with the 
American costs, have been nearly double. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



31 



'0 



\\fE have 
the nic- 
est set of Hose 
samples ever 
shown to the 
Canadian & 
trade. Don't 
fail to see 
them. 



HOSE 

GARDEN 

STEAM 

SUCTION 

ETC. 

Send for samples and quotations. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



\\^E make 
Hose of 
all kinds for all 
purposes. Our 
equipment is 
the most mod- 
ern and our 
goods are per- 
fection. 



THE DURHAM RUBBER CO., limited 



!o>vmanville. On-t. 



See ! You Don't 

Have to Pull. 
A Child Can Do It. 






No. 14 




[WALKER 5 UNIVERSAL I 
^ iCLF PULLINC- .J 



N0.I6 



A 



Walker's Self=Pulling Cork Screws 

Made of Crucible Steel, Nickel Plated, Polished Apple Wood Handles. 

EVERY ONE TESTED AND GUARANTEED. Several imitations on the market, but none as good. 

Mfrd. only by ERIE SPECIALTY CO., Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 




Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Sauare and Hexagon. 



ONTARIO SILVER CO., 



Limited, 
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

„ . . , FLATWARE, CUTLERY a 

Manufacturers of electro PLATE. 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations 



"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn ' 
Patent Guard. Sole maker— 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

Cables — Emlyn Engineering Works, 

" Machinery," Newport. Newport, Mon., England. 




JVbbles 8? Mo arc 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 

Which can be obtained direct from the -works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada. 



CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY 

Montreal. 

Watch our ad. in next issue, or write to us fo 
particulars on our patented 

Automatic Door Strip and Weather Strip 

Specially adapted for cold climates and takes 
the place of the inner window. 

HELMS & HELMS, us so wniow st., 

PHILADELPHIA. 






32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



solely by reason of the attitude of the 
combination, the trust of labor that pre- 
dominates in England. 

'" It was my pleasure to speak a short 
time ago before a lot of labor people 
we brought together for the purpose of 
settling these questions in New York, 
and I said this thing, which 1 think is 
fundamentally true : ' 1 am in favor of 
labor unions. 1 am not opposed to labor 
unions, as many people think. I favor 
them— when properly organized. 1 am 
opposed, and decidedly opposed, to labor 
unions where they have as their basis 
the restriction of output.' 

CALLS ATTENTION TO WAGES 

' There is another mistaken idea about 
this labor question. Many people, speak 
ing of the capitalization of the steel in- 
dustry, refer to its great bond issue, but 
1 would like to call attention to this 
fact- that tin; laborers an- the first peo 
pie who have a first mortgage on this 
great property. We pay out in round 
numbers 3160,000,000 annuallv for labor. 
That is the interest on $3,000,000,000 of 
capital that must be paid before a penny 
of the interest on those bonds can be 
paid. 

" Gentlemen. L stand here and say 
that we are not going to have any dis- 
agreement with labor over the fair re- 
turn they ought to receive. We will be 
more than liberal with them in that 
direction, but we insist that we shall be 
treated with equal fairness ; that we 
shall manage our works as we see fit and 
shall not lie controlled by a trust that 
will regulate the output of their labor. 

" We want the men to stand upon their 
own merits. We want the good men to 
come forward and we want the poor man 
to stand still, and that is as it should 
be. Many organizations insist that all 
men shall be leveled to the standard of 
the pool est. and that is on the wrong 
basis. 

" Now, I am going to tell you the 
most serious thing, to my mind, in re- 
gard to the future of the great organiza 
tions of capital. The great business en- 
terprises of the past have been built up 
by the individual interest and individual 
efforts of certain individuals. If you will 
look back over the great businesses thai 
have been built up you will find that 
they have been the result of some one 
great mind, which has had all his inter- 
est in that business, who has had all his 
mind in that business — in other words, 
who has had all his eggs in that basket. 

" The result of that individualism was 
great progress, great extensions, great 
economies and great successes. The difli 
culty with these great combinations of 
capital is going to be to get people to 
manage them. 

WILL MAKE EMPLOYES PARTNERS. 

' Now, I believe that difficulty can be 
met, and the way we intend to try to 

i t it is this : It is the intention of 

the United States steel organization to 
put every man in charge of a little 
branch of business, even a department of 
business, not on a salary, but on a per 
ventage of the profits, which will be paid 
to him in cash and which he can invest 
in the securities if he wishes, and in that 
way get his individual effort upon his 
individual work. 

" We don't believe that we get that 
from salaries, but we do believe that we 
can come as near making a man a part- 
ner in that direction as in any other way 
that has yet 'been devised, and, commenc- 
ing with the first of the coming year, it 



is our intention to operate every one of 
our great departments on that basis. - 

" We shall be glad at your next annual 
banquet, if we have the privilege of 
attending, of telling you the result of 
that experiment." 



A BRITISH FIRM'S TRADE WITH 
CANADA. 

Richard .Johnson, Clapham & Morris, 
Limited, Manchester, England, who have 
been doing a trade in metals with Can 
ada for a great many years, have recent 
ly extended their operations here. One of 
their travellers visited the Dominion last 
year and arranged with the following 
firms to look after their business : — 
Messrs. Copland & Co., of Montreal, in 
the Provinces of Quebec and Ontario ; 
Messrs. Grant, Oxley & Co., of Halifax. 
N.S., in the Maritime Provinces; Mr. 
Chas. Stimson, of Vancouver. B.C., in 
the Far West ; Mr. E. H. Bissett, of Win- 
nipeg, in Manitoba. 

As the results of these combined efforts 
they have considerably increased their 
business operations in the Dominion in 
all branches, and specially in their well 
known " J. C. M." brands of galvanized 
iron, which they claim to be. fully equal 
to anything offered in the market, a 
proof of this being the number of repeat 
orders constantly being received. 

In tinplates their " Relever " brand is 
largely in demand, and they look for- 
ward to an increased share of the trade 
for the future. They have a large and 
competent staff prepared to deal prompt- 
ly with all orders from the Canadian 
market, and intending purchasers may 
rely on their orders being executed with 
every care and attention. 

\l. Johnson, Clapham & Morris, Lim- 
ited, are manufacturers on a large scale 
of all kinds of wire netting, -woven wire, 
wire work, and have an extensive brass 
foundry, brass-finishing establishment, 
and engineering works. Some two years 
ago they purchased a very favorably- 
situated site on the outskirts of Man 
chester, of some eight acres in extent. On 
this they have erected an extensive 
modern works, of which the main build- 



ing is 360 feet long by 220 feet wide, 
divided into six bays of 50 feet, and one 
of 60 feet wide. These bays are support- 
ed by iron pillars. Early next year the 
firm will move into their new works, 
which will be electrically lighted and 
fitted with the most modern machinery 
of every kind. In addition to these 
works, they have erected one of the^ pst 
equipped and largest brass foundrit in 
the North of England. The works offices, 
which are very extensive, are situated in 
a separate building adjoining the main 
works. 

" Hardware and Metal " hopes at no 
very distant date to furnish illustrations 
of these works. 



A BOOK FOR ACCOUNTANTS. 

*' Book Keeping for Joint Stock Com- 
panies," by David Hoskins, C. A., a treatise 
that has just been issued, is a valuable text- 
book not only for accountants, but for all 
employes of joint stock companies. Mr. 
Hoskins' long experience and exhaustive 
study of accountancy has enabled him 
within the 150 pages of his book to give 
many valuable hints and much information. 
It also contains chapters on the duties of 
secretary-treasurers of companies and ex- 
tracts from the Ontario Companies Act, the 
provisions of which it is essential that 
company officers should be familiar with. 
Mr. Wm. Eddis, F C.A., president of the 
Institute of Chartered Accountants of 
Ontario, speaks of the volume as a 
' valuable addition to accountancy literature. 
The bookkeeping and forms illustrated 
therein are thoroughly practical and worked 
out from the accountancy's standpoint." 
Mr. Hoskins is principal of the British- 
American Business College, Toronto, and 
vice president of the Institute of Chartered 
Accountants of Ontario. The book is sub- 
stantially bound in cloth and gold, and 
published at $1. 50. Copies may be had by 
addressing Mr. Hoskins. 



Don't waste good work 




on poor galvanized iron 




— unless you want to be 




taught by experience. 




Apollo is good. 




American Sheet Steel Company, New York 




Representatives for Canada 




B. & S. H. Thompson & Company 




26 St. Sulpice Street 




Montreal 





CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 



ft 



BRAND 



midland" "The Peerless" 



F&undry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Prices to Sales Agents 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

or to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 



is the best Bolster Spring ever 
produced. A fine line for the 
hardware trade, write u» For Price*. 




James Warnock & Co. 



Gait, Ont. 



CUKHEfJT JVIA^ET QUOTATIONS. 



Jan ary 3, 1902. 
These prices are for such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list as the desire 
s to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots, per lb. 30 31 

Tinplates. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright 

M.L.S., equal to Bradley. Pi r box 

I.O., usual sizes 16 75 

I.X., " 8 25 

I.X.X., " 9 75 

Famous— 

1.0 6 75 

I.X 8 25 

I.X.X 9 75 

Raven & Vulture Grades— 

I.O., UBual sizes 5 00 

I.X., " 6 10 

I.X.X " 7 00 

I.XXX., " 8 00 

D.O.,12%xl7 4 50 

D.X 5 25 

D.X.X 6 00 

Coke Plates— Bright 
Bessemer Steel— 

I. O. .usual sizes 4 50 

I.C., special sizes, base 4 85 

20x28 9 50 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheets 8 50 

I.X.,TerneTin 10 50 

CharcoalTin Boilor Pla 

Cookley Grade— Per lb. 
X X., 14x56, SOsheet bis ) 

" 14x60, " > .... 06'/, 

•' 14x65. " ) 

Tinned Sheets 

7ix30up to 24 gauge 07% 

26 " 08 

Iron and Steel. 
Common Bar, per 100 lbs.... 195 2 05 

Refined " " 2 45 

Borse Shoe Iron ' 2 40 

Hoop steel, 1% to 3 in. base, 

Sleigh Shoe Steel " base ...■ 2 10 

TireSteel 2 30 2 50 

Reeled Machinery 3 00 

ToeCalkSteel 2 85 3 00 

T. Firth & Cos tool steel.per lbO 12% 13 

Jeasop's tool Steel .... 14 

Morton's tool Bteel C 12% 13 

Black Diamond and " B.C," 

J^ool steel 10 11 

CJ f Leonard's tool steel.... 08 09 

DriTl'steel, per lb C8 10 

Boiler Tubes. 

1%-inch 12% 

2 •' 13 

2% " 15 

3 ■■ 16 

3 u •• " " 20 

4 ■• :::"".:""..!...:" .... 025 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

%inch 2 50 2 60 

3.16.r.oh 2 60 2 70 

H inch and thloker 2 50 2 60 

Black Sheets. 

Com. D.F1. 

ISgauge 285 3 00 

02 gauge 2 85 3 CO 

22to24 " 2 95 2 25 

og •• 3 05 3 50 

26 •• :::::: 315 .... 



Oanad a Plates. 

All dull, 52 sheets 3 05 

Half polished 3 15 

Allhright 3 75 

Per 1C0 Feet. 
Black pipe- Iron Pipe. 

% " 4 65 

% inch 3 40 

& •■ 345 

% " 370 

£ " 385 

1* " 5 40 

1% " 7 70 

1% " 9 20 

2 " 12 50 

2% " 24 00 

3 " 28 10 

3% " 36 00 

4 " 43 00 

4% " 5C CO 

5" " 57 CO 

6 " 73 00 

Galvanized pipe— 

V, inch 5 15 

y. " 5 50 

i 4 ■■ ::::::::..:: 795 

W, " 10 80 

1% " 12 95 

2 " 17 35 

5 p. c. off to [referred buyers. 

Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 
G C. Comet. Amer. Head. 

16 gauge — 

18 to 24 gauge 4 15 3 75 .... 4 15 

26 " 4 35 4 (0 .... 4 35 

28 " 4 60 4 25 .... 4 60 

Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 

28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 

Chain. 

Proof Coil, 3-16 in., per 100 lb 

■ ■ U " 7 85 8 10 

5-16 " " 4 95 5 25 

% " " 4 £5 4 60 

7.16 " " 4 15 4 40 

i/_ " " 4 (0 4 25 

9.16 " " 3 90 4 15 

% " " 3 80 4 05 

$ " •• 3 85 4 10 

Halter, kenneland post chains, 40 to 40 and 

5 p.o. .„ 

Cow ties f,°P- c - 

Tie-out chains J? pc - 

Stallfixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain • •• 4» p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, dis- 
count 35 p c. . . . ., ,. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

Copper. 

Ingot Per 100 lb. 

English B.S., ton lots 16 Oj 

LakeSuperior •■ 

Bars. 
Cutlengtheround,%to%in. 23 CO 25 CO 
round and square 
1 to 2 inches.... 23 CO 25 00 
Sheet. 
Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., 14x48 and 14x60 ..« *><> 24 .0 

Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., irregular sizes 24 J) is uu 

Tinned copper sheets || JJJ 

PlaQiBh6d Brazil.- (inlets J" 

4x6f t. 25 to 30 lbs. ea. , per lb « g 

" 35to45 " ,, ■••• " (* 

" 50-lb. and above, . •••• u *> 

Boiler and T.K. Pitts 

Plain Tinned, per lb u ^> 

Spun.perlb u " 

Copper Ware. 
Discount, 50 per cent. 

Brass. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge 10 Percent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 « £{ 

Tubing, base, per t u *»/i 



Zinc Spelter 

Foreign, perlb 15% 06 

Domestio " 

Zinc Sheet. 

5-cwt.oasks 6(0 6 25 

Partcasks 06 C6!4 

Lead. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb . . 3 75 4 00 

Bar.l lb —" 95 

Sheets, 2% lbs. sq.ft., by .... 06% 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs., " .... 06 

Note— Cut sheets % cent per lb. extra. 
Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, list s 
at 7c. per lb. and 30 p.c. dis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

NOTE.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
J-ft. lengths lists at 7% cents. 
Shot. 

Common, $6.50 per 100 lb. ; chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb. ; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 17% p.c. Prices are fob. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 oer cent, cash, freights equalized. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 

Discount, 60 and 10 per cent, on medium and 
extra heavy, and 60 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Perlb. Perlb. 
Bar half-and-half, guarant'd .... 1«% 

Bar half-and-half, commer'l 19 

Refined 18% 

Wiping 18 

Antimony. 
Cookson's, per lb 10'/, 11 

White Lead. Per 100 lb. 

Pure 6 12% 

No. 1 5 75 

No.2 5 37% 

No.3 5 00 

No. 4 4 62% 

Munro's Select Flake White 6 37 V 2 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 6 12% 

Brandram'sB B. Genuine 8 25 

" No. 1 7 50 

Bed Lead. 

Genuine, 5601b. casks, per cwt $4 75 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 00 

No. 1, 5601b. casks, per cwt 4 25 

No. 1, 1001b. kegs, per cwt 4 50 

White Zinc. 

Extra Red Seal 06 08 

No. 1 05% 17 

No. 2 05 06 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, casks 5 25 

Pure, kegs 5 50 

No. l.casks 5C0 

No. 1, kegs 5 ?5 

Prepared Paints. 
In %, % and 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 125 

Second qualities.per gallon 1 10 

Barn (inbbls.) 60 9) 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 1 40 

Canada Paint Co's Pure 125 

Toronto Lead & Color Go's Pure 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 20 

Colors in Oil. 

25 lb. tins, Standard Qualify. 

Venetian Red, per lb 04% 06 

Chrome Yellow 12 14 

Golden Ochre 08 10 

French " 06 

MarineBlack 09 

Chrome Green 10 

French Imperial Green 12 

Sign Writers' Black 16 

Burnt Umber 11 

'• Sienna 11 

Raw Umber 11 

" Sienna 11 



Colors, Dry. 

Common Ochre bbls 1 20 1 30 

Yellow Ocbre J.F.L.S.), bbls ... 2 00 

Yellow Ochre (La Belle) 115 125 

Brussels Ochre 2 00 

Venetian Red (best), bbl .... 1 75 2 00 

Knglish Oxides, per owt 3 00 3 25 

Amerioan Oxides, bbls 125 2 00 

Canadian Oxides, 1 bis 125 175 

Super MagnetioOxides,93p.o. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" Umber, " " 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Black, pure 09 

Chrome Yellows, pure 18 

Chrome Greens, pure, perlb. 0(9 10 

Golden Ocbre 04 05 

Ultramarine Blue in 28-lb.. 

boxes, per lb 06 18 

Fire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb 100 

Genuine Eng. Litharge, per lb 07 

Mortar Color, per 100 lb 125 1 E0 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45 lb. I 8 10 

Whiting, bid 55 60 

English Vermillion in 3C-lb. bags. 95 

Paris Green. per lb. 

Petroleum Casks 16^ 

Arsenic Kegs 17 

50-lb. and lov-lb. diunis 17% 

25-lb. drums 18 

lib packages 18% 

%-lb. do 20% 

lib. tins l'jyj 

%-lb do 21% 

F.O B. Montreal. Terms— 3 p. c. off 30 
days, or 4 mos. from date of de ivery. 
Bine Stone. 

Casks, for spraying, per lb 07 

100-lb. lots, do. per lb 08 

Putty. 

Bulkinbbls 1 90 

Bulk in less quantity 2 05 

Bladders in bbls 2 25 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose 2 40 

Bladders in 25-lb. tins 2 35 

Bladders in 12%-lb. tins 2 65 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 1001b2 90 
Varnishes. 
In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. net. 

Carriage, No. 1 150 160 

Pale Durable body 4 10 4 25 

" rubbing 2 85 3 00 

Gold Size, Japan 2 85 3 00 

No. 1 Brown Japan 85 

Elastic Oak 150 

Furniture, extra 125 

No.l 85 

Hard Oil Finish 165 175 

Light Oil Finish 140 160 

Demar 1 70 1 80 

Shellao, white 2 31 2 45 

" orange 2 25 2 35 

Turpentine Brown Japan 1 25 

" Black Japan.... 85 90 

" No. 1.. 70 75 

Elastilite Varnish 1 gal. can, each, $3.00. 

Cranatine Flooi Finish per gal. , $2.75. 
Maple Leaf Coach Enamels ; Size 1, $1 20 
Size 2, 70c. ; Size 3, 40c each. 

Castor Oil. 

East India, in cases, per lb.. 0(9% 10 

" small lots 10 10% 

Cod Oil, kite. 

CodOilpergal 50 55 

Pure Olive 1 20 

" Neatsfoot 90 

Glue. 

Common . . 08% 08 

French Medal 14 14% 

Cabinet sheet 12 13 

White, extra 18 20 

Gelatine 22 30 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 19 



34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



JAflES HUTTON & CO. 



Sole Agents in Canada for 

Joseph Rodgers & Sons, Limited, 
Steel, Peech & Tozer, Limited, 
W. & S. Butcher, 



Thomas Goldsworthy & Sons, 
Burroughes & Watts, Limited, 
Etc., Etc., 



•< 



I 



Have reopened their offices in Victoria Chambers, 



232 McGill Street, 



MONTREAL. 



HARDWARE. 
Ammunition. 

Cartridges. 

B. B Oais Dom. 50 and 5 per cent. 

Rim Fire Pistol, dis. 40 p. o., Amer. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5 p. o. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, lOp.o. Aioer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes Dom. 
30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 per cent. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer. 
add 5 p.c. to list. B.B. Caps, discount 40 
per cent. Amer. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
" Dominion " grades, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 p.c. advance on list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 percent.; American, $1.63. 
Wads per lb. 

Best thick white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bags 1 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-lb. bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each,10gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 
each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each — Per M 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 1C gauges 70 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 

Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Wright's, 801b. and over 10 3 4 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over .... 09% 

Brook's, " " " .... 11% 

Angers . 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 p.c. off list. 
Axes. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit, perdoz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 1100 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 

Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boy's Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Bestquality 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tnbs. 

Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 15 p.c. off revised list 

Baths. 

Standard Enameled. 

5%'inch rolled rim, 1st quality 25 00 

' 2nd " 21 00 

Anti-Friction Metal. 

"Tandem" A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

C " 11% 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 

Frictionless metal, per lb 23 

Phosphcrine 6 to 30 

SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Dynamo 29 

Special 25 

Aluminum, 99 p.c. pure "Syracuse".. 50 
Bells. 
Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55per cent. 



Cow. 
Amerioan make, discount 66% per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

i Songs, Sargants 5 50 £00 

" Peter boro. discount 45 per cent. 
Farm. 

American , each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, perdoz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 60 percent. 
Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 
No. 1, not wider than 6 io., 50 10 and 10 p.c. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 p c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen. , net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, perdoz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 12 

Bolts and Nuts . Percent. 

Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list) . . . 55 and 5 

" " full square ($2.40 list) 60 and 5 

" " Norway iron ($3 list) 60 and 5 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 55 and 5 

Plough Bolts 55 and 5 

Blank Bolts 60 

Bolt Ends 60 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 70 

Coach Screws, cone point 70 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 3-\ic per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes. 4c. per lb. off. 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6o. 

Nuts, in 50 lb. lols '4c. per lb extra in less 
than 50 lb lots, fats, extra. 

Boot Calks. 

Small and medium, ball, per M 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 62%percent. 

Broilers . 
Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent. 

Henis, No. 8 , " 6 00 

Henis, No. 9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers' Cleavers. 

German, perdoz 6 00 1100 

Amerioan, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Tarred felt, per 100 lb 1 70 

Rtady roofing, 2-ply, not under 4> lb. 

per rol 1 85 

Ready roofing, 3-plv, not under 65 lb. 

per roll 1 10 

Carpet felt, per ton 45 00 

Dry sheathing, per roll, 400 sq ft 35 

Tar sheathing, " " " 45 

Dry fibre " " ' 55 

Tarred fibre, f5 

O.K. fcl.X.L., 10 

Resin-sized. " " " 4) 

Oiled sheatihg. " 600 " 1 10 

" 400 " 70 

R' of coa'ing, in barrels, per gal 17 

" small packages i5 

Rtti ed tar, per barrel 4 50 

Coal tar, " 4 00 

C al tar, less than barrels, jer gal... 15 

Roofing pit h, per 100 lb 85 

Bull Kings. 
Copper , $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 

Bntts. 
Wrought Brass, net revised ist 



Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 60 per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Loose Pin, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per o nt. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

Amerioan, per doz 100 150 

Bullard's, per doz 6 50 .... 

Castors. 

Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52%-to 57% per cent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, per gross 8 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 25 2 75 

English " 3 00 3 15 

Belgian " 2 50 2 75 

Canadian hydraulio 125 150 

Chalk. 
Carpenters Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per cwt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon, per gross 14 18 

Chisels. 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Warnock's, dis. 70 percent. 
P. S. & W. Extra 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 

Churns. 

Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8— 

No. 1, $8.50— No. 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00— 

No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 

wood frames— 20o. each less than above. 

Discounts : Delivered from factories, 56 

p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 54 p.c. 

Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days. 

Clips. 

Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets Net. 

Plain York or Ontario Syphon Jet. $9 6) 
Emb. York or Ontario Syphon Jet. 10 20 

Fittings l 00 

Plain Elgin orTeu. SyphonWashout 6 00 
Emb. Elginor Teu. Syphon Washout 6 60 

Fittings i 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic, plain 9 60 
" " " " emb. 10 20 

Plain Richelieu 4 00 

Emb. Richelieu 4 25 

Connections 1 25 

Low Down Oat. Sy. Jet, plain 1170 

" " " " " emb'd 12 30 

Closet connection 1 25 

BaBinsP.O., 14 in 70 

" oval, 17x14 in 150 

" " 19 x 15 in ... 2 25 

Compasses, Dividers, Etc. 
American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 

Cradles, Grain . 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per cent. 
Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. & D., No. 3, per pair 17% 

" 5, " 22% 

" " 6, " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

Door Springs. 

Torrey'sRod, perdoz (15 p.c.) 2 00 

Coil, perdoz 88 160 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 
Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per cent. 
Drills. 
Hand and Breast. 
Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 
DRILL BITS. 
Morse, dis., 37% to 40 per cent. 
Standard dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

Faucets. 
Common, cork-lined, dis. 35 per cent. 

ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) perdoz. 

5 and 6-inch, common 1 20 

7-inch 1 35 

Polished, 15c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 45 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 



FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES AND RASPS. 
Great Western 70 and 10 per cent. 



10 

in 
10 
1> 
10 
10 
10 



Arcade 70 

Kearney k Foot 70 

Difston's 70 

American 70 

J. Barton Smith 7» 

McClellan 70 

Eagle 70 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 6). 10 and 5 

Royal 80 

Globe 70 to 75 " 

Black Diamond, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 p.c 
Jowitt'a, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 
Nicholson File Co s "Simplicity" file handle, 
per gross, R5c. to $1.50. 

GLASS— Window— Box Price. 





Star 


D. D 


amond 


Size United 


Per 


Per 


Per 


Per 


Inches. 


50 ft. 


100 ft 


50 ft. 


100 ft. 


Under 26 


2 21 


4 25 




6 25 


26 to 40 


2 40 


4 65 




6 75 


41 to 50 




5 10 




7 50 


51 to 60 




5 35 




8 50 


61 to 70 




5 75 




9 70 


71 to 80 




6 2". 




11 00 


81 to 85 




7 00 




12 55 


86 to 90 




7 75 




15 (0 


91 to 95 








17 50 


96 to 100 








20 50 


101 to 105 








24 CO 


U6toll0 








27 50 



GAUGES 
Marking, Mortise, Etc 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, each. . . 1 65 

HALTERS. 
Rope, % per gross 

■• % to %t .'.'.'":.■".■.'.' ;..'.' 

Leather, 1 in., perdoz 3 87% 

" l%in., " 5 15 

Web, —perdoz 187 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis. 5 to 10 per cent. Can. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

• Tack. 

Magnetic, per doz 110 

Sledge. 

Canadian, per lb 07% 08X 

Ball Pean. 
English and Can., per lb 22 

HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz. net 150 

Store door, per doz 100 

Fork. 
C. 4 B. , dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. iBt. 

Saw. 
American, perdoz 100 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 40 percent. 

Cross-Cut Saws. 
Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns , 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered- 
No. 11, 5-ft. run 

No.11%, 10-ft.run 

No. 12,l0-ft.run 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 2100 

Lane's O.N. T. track, per foot. .... 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
Discount, 70 per cent. 

HATCHETS. 
Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cent. 



2 40 



9 00 
14 00 

4 00 

5 20 
2 45 



dis. 



I 20 



25 



2 00 
1 50 



1 25 



«! 



8 40 
10 80 
12 60 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



36 



USE PHOSPHORINE BABBITT METAL 



% 



It is the new di 
•very. Ask for 
rticulars. 



It is the only 
Anti-Friction 
Metal known to be 
chemically pure. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nlckle, etc., always in stock. 



CANADIAN WORKS, MONTREAL, P.Q. 
AMERICAN " SYRACUSE, NY. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, die. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent 
Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb. . . . 06% 
" " 5-in., " .... 06V 4 

" " 6-in., " .... 06 

" " 8-in., " .... 05% 

" " 10-in.. '• .... 05% 

Light T and strap, dis. 65 and 5 per cent. 
Sorew hook and hinge— 

6 to 10 in., per 100 lbs 4 25 

12 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 25 

Per gro. pairs. 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 
Qarden, Mortar, etc., dis. 50 and lOp.c. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Disoount 45 and 5 per cent. 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 100 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can dis 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, discount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Sorew, bright, dis. 55 per oent. 

HORSE NAILS. 
"C'brand 50 and 7%p.c.off newliitl Oval- 
"M" brand 50, 10 and 5 per cent. /head 
Countersunk. 60 per oent. 

HORSESHOES 

F.O.B. Montreal. 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron ShoeB. and and 

larger, smaller. 
Light, medium, and heavy... 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 60 3 85 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

F.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 pc. off list, June 1899 
ICE PICKS. 

Star per doz 3 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.c. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lb 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.c. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Can., dis., 45 p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, aud padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned andN.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. ft L. 

screw, per gross 130 4 00 

White door knobs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per oent. 
<L • LANTERNS. 

/ Blast, per doz... 7 00 

No. 3 "Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 00 

No. 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

Allglass 1 20 1 30 

LINES. 

Fish .pergross 105 2 50 

Chalk " 190 7 40 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

Russel ft Erwin, per doz 3 00 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 



Padlock 
English and Am. perdoz.... 50 6 00 

Scandinavian, " 1 00 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 20 to 25 p.c 

MACHINE SCREWS. Iron and Brass. 
Flat head discount25 p.c ■ 
Round Head discount 20 p.c. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' perdoz 1 25 1 50 

Carpenters', hickory, per doz 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulking each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 
Canadian, perdoz 5 50 6 50 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 
Discount, 25 per cent. 

NAILS. 
Quotations are : Cut. Wire. 

2d and 3d $3 55 $3 85 

3d 3 20 3 52 

4and5d 2 95 3 35 

6and7d 2 85 3 20 

8 and 9d 2 70 3 00 

10andl2d 2 65 2 95 

16and20d 2 60 2 90 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 55 2 85 

Wire nails in carlots are $2.77% 
Galvanizing 2c. per lb. net extra. 
Steel Cut Nails 10c extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, diB. 70 and 10 p.c. 
Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barrel nails, dis 25 percent 
NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 185 3 50 

NAILSET8 
Square, round, and octagon 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 CO 

POULTRY NETTING. 
2 in. Mesh 19 w.g., dis. 61 p.c. 
£-in. Mesh, 18 w.g. and heav er, 50 aud 10 p.o 

OAKUM. Per 100 lb- 

Navy 6 00 

U.S. Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Water White(U.S.) 16% 

Prime Wbite (U.S.) 15% 

Water White (Can. 15 

Prime White (Can.) 14 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oil 
can, with pump, 5 gal., 

per doz 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 125 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 ner cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dufferin pattern pails, dis. 45 p.c. 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs discount 45 percent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 40 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, dis. 40 p.c. 
6, 10 and 14-qt. Airing pai s, dis. 40 p.c. 
Creamer cans, dis. 40 p. c. 
PICKS. 

Perdoz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 
Porcelainhead, per gross.... 175 3 00 
Brass head " ... 40 1 00 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 
PLANES. 
Wood , bench, Canadian dis. 40 per cent. 

American dis. 50. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American 7% 
to 40 per cent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English, per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS 
Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.c. 
Button's Imitation, perdoz.. 5 00 9 00 

German, per do?. 60 2 60 

POWDER. 
Ve'o c Smjkeless Shotgun Powder. 

lOHb.orless 85 

1,0„0 lb or more 80 

Net 30 days. 



PRESSED SPIKES. 
Disoount 22% per ceat. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz 55 100 

Axle 22 33 

Screw 27 100 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 1 80 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 100 185 

Conductors's ' 9 00 15 00 

Tinners', solid. per set 00 72 

hollow pai inch 00 100 

RAKES. 
Wood, 10 per cent. 

RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Elliot's 4 00 18 00 

Geo. Butler* Co.'s 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

" King Cutter 12 50 50 00 

Wade ft Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile ft Quack's 7 00 12 00 

REGISTERS. 

Discount, 40peicent 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 

and 10 percent. 
Iron Burrs, liscount55 per cent. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons . %c. 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets ft Burrs, 35 and 5 p.c. dis. 

and cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets 
%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
RIVET SETS 
Canadian diB. 35 to 37% percent. 
ROPE ETC. 

Sisal 12 

"British" Manilla 13% 

Pure Manilla 15% 

Cotton, 3-16inch and larger 16 

" 5-32inch 21 

" %inch 22% 

Russia D jep Sea 15% 

Jute s 

Lath Yarn 1014 

RULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p,c. 

SADIRONS. per set. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished 65 

" No. 50, nickle-plated 75 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% pe cent. 
B ft A. sand, 40 and 5 per cent. 
Bmery, 40 per cent. 
Garoet(Rurton's), 5 to 10 p.c. advanceonlist 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz.. . 9 50 

SAWS. 
Hand Disston's.dis. 12% p.c. 
S. ft D., 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston'B, per ft.... 35 55 
S. ft D., dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2 and3. 

Hack, complete, each 75 2 75 

1 frame only .... 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 2 25 2 50 

Solid, " 175 2 00 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 23 30 

SAW SETS 
" Lincoln" anl Wh ting, per doz... 4 75 
HandSets No. 1 Woodyalt (Morrill) 4 25 
X-cutsets,No.3 Woodyatt(M'Trill) 9 50 

SCALES. 
Standard, 41 p.c. 
Champion, 55 p c. 
Spring Balances. 10 p.n. 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p. o.) 
11 Dominion, 55 p.c. 

" Richelieu, 55 p.c. 

Warren's new Standard 45 p c. 
" " Champion f5 p.c. 
SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's per doz 65 100 

SCREWS 
Wood, F. H., brightand steel, 87% and lOp.c 
Wood R. H., " dis. 82% and 10 p.c 
" F. H., brass dis. 80 and 10 p.c. 



Wood, R. H., " dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
" F.H., bronze, dis. 75 p.c 
R.H. " 70 p.c. 

Drive Screws, 87% and 10 percent. 

Bench, wood, per doz 3 25 4 00 

" iron, " 4 25 5 75 

Set, Case hardened, 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, 45 per cent. 
SCYTHES. 

Per doz, net 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS. 
Bailey Cutlery Co., full nickeled, diB. 60 p.c. 
Seymour's, dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 percent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1150 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

l,l%lb.,perlb 37 

2 lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, perdoz 2 40 2 55 

" Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 60 10 and 5 p.c. 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% pp. 
STAMPED WARE. 
Plain, dis. ,75 and 12% p.c. off revised list 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 50 4 00 

Plain 3 25 3 75 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 

STOCKS AND DIES. 
American dis. 25 p.c. 

STONE. Per lb. 

Washita 28 60 

Hindostan 06 07 

slip 09 09 

Labrador 13 

" Axe 15 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas 00 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind.2in,40 to2001b,per ton .... 25 00 

" under 40 lb. " 28 00 

Grind, under 2 in. thick " 29 00 

STOVE PIPES. 
5 and 6 inch Per 100 lengths .... 7 00 

7 inch " " 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 

No. 4— 3 dozen in case, net cash $4 80 

No. 6— 3 dozen in case, " 8 40 

TACKS BRADS, ETC. 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80 ft 12% 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned ... .85 

Carpet tackB, blued 80 ft 15 

" " tinned 80 ft 20 

1 " (in kegs) 40 

Out tacks, blued, in dozens only . 80 

" % weights 60 

Swedes cut, tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 4 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholeterera', bulk... 85, 12% ft 12% 
" brush, blued ft tinned, bulk. .70 
" gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 ft 12% 

Zino tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

Copper tack* 50 

Copper nails 5' % 

Trunk nails blac* 65ana 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails ... . 35 

Patent bradB ... 40 

Fine finishing 4) 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 



36 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

CHAIN 



PITTSBURGH, 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF' 



U. S. A. 



OF ALL KINDS. 



%> 



Proof Coil, B.B., B.B.B., Crane, Dredge Chain, Trace Chains, Cow Ties, etc. 
A1EX £?K, BIBB ' -Canadian B,pr M en«a«iv M - fc&Jff™ * ™- 



Montreal. 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 



For other Provinces. 



Lining tacks, in bulk 15 

" " Bolid headB, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin oapped trunk nails 25 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

" " " bulk 40 

TAPE LINES. 
English, ass skin, per doz.... 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

" steel, each 80 8 00 

THERMOMETERS. 
Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.o. 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Same, Newhouse, dis. 25 p.c. 
Game, H. * N, , P. S. & W. , 65 p.o. 
Game, steel, 72%, 75 p.c. 

TROWELS. 

Disston s discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

3. & D., discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 18V4 

" 4-ply 23'/ 2 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

8taging, " 27 35 



Wright's 


VISES. 




13'4 






12'4 
3 50 
5 50 
9 00 


Pipe Vise 


Hinge, No. 1 

" No 2 .... 


! 450 
FARE. 
Blueanc 

50 and 
Crescec 


ENAMELLED V 

White, Princess, Turquoise, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial 
and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 


White, 

10 p.o. 
t, 50, 10 



Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per oent. off the 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and 10 per cent, net cash 30 
days, f.o.b. factory. 
Smooth Steel Wire, is quoted at the 
following net selling prices : 
No. 6 to 8 gauge $2 90 



2 80 
2 87 
2 90 

2 95 

3 15 
3 37 
3 50 
3 65 



Other sizes of plain wire outside of Mos. 9, 
10, 11, 12 and 13, and other varieties of 
plain wire remain at 82.80 base with 
extras as before. The prices for Nos. 9, 



to 13 include the charge of Kc. 
for oiling. Extras net per 100 lb.: 
Coppered wire, 60c— tinned wire, $2— 
oiling, 10c— special hay-bailing wire, 30c 
—spring wire, $1— best steel wire, 75c— 
bright soft drawn, 15c— in 50 and 100-lb. 
bundles net, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles net 
15c— packed in casks or cases, 15c— 
bagging or papering, 10c. 

Fine Steel Wire, dis. 17% per cent. 
List of extras : In 100-lb. lots : No. 
17, 85— No. 18, $5.50— No. 19, $6-No. 20, 
*6.65-No. 21, $7— No. 22, $7.30— No. 23, 
7.65 -No. 24, $8— No. 25, $9— No. 26 
$9.50-No. 27, $10-No. 28, $11 No. 29. 
$12-No. 30, $13-No. 31,$14-No. 32, $1J 
No. 33, $16— No. 34, $17. ExtraB net- 
tinned wire, Nob. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31 
$4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 5c— oil 
ing, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles,15c— in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
in %-lb. hanks, 75c— in %-\b. hanks, $1— 
packed in casks orcases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c 

Galvanized Wire, perlOOlb.— Nos. 6,7,8, $3.50 
to $3 8i— No. 9, 32.85 to $3.15— No. 10 
$3.60 to $3.95— No. 11, $3.70 to $4.10-No 
12, $3 to $3.30— No. 13, $3.10 to $3.40— 
No. 14, $4.10 to $4.50-No. 15, $4.60 to 
$5.05— No. 16. $4.85 to $5 35. Base sizes, 
Nos. 6 to 9 $2.52 l / 2 f.o b. Cleveland. 

Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand. No. 17, 
$4.65; No. 18, $2.90; No. 19, $2.60. Hol- 



low 6 strand, No. 17, JM.3"; No. 18. $270 
No. 19, $2.35; No 20, $2.30, f.o.b. Hamil 
ton.Toronto, Montreal. 

WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 3 00 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 00 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.77V 2 
in less than carlots, and $2.65 in carlots 
WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft., net.. 1 26 
WASTE COTTON. per lb. 

Colored 6 

White 8 

WRENCHES. 
Acme, 35 to 37Vi per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe's Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

Towers' Engineer, each 2 00 7 00 

" S., per doz 5 80 6 00 

G. 4 K.'s Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket , per doz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian.. " 24 00 

Royal American., " .... 24 00 

Sampson " 24 00 

Terms 4 months, or 3 p.c. 30 days. 
WROUGHT IRON WASHER8. 
Canadian make, discount, 40 per cent. 



JONES BROS. 

Bracondale, P.O., Ontario. 

Stove Brick Manfrs.; also Stove and Furnace 
Cement. Fire Clay in Packages or Bulk. Over 200 
styles of brick of all makers of stoves ; trade sup- 
plied only ; write for prices and catalogue. All 
goods sent F.O.B. Toronto. 

ADVERTISING in WESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG CANADA. 

THE OAKVILLE 

BASKET CO., 



Manufacturers of 




I, 2, 3 Bushel 

Grain 

AND 

Root 

BUSTS 

THE DAKVILLE 

BASKET CO. 




Canadian Representative: ALEXANDER GIBB, 13 St. John St., MONTREAL. 



75 YEARS. 



CELEBRATED 



ESTABLISHED 1825. 



75 YEARS. 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. Ki^^.r^sV Chambe " st 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



Book-keeping 

FOR 

Joint Stock 
Companies 

A text-book for the use of accountants, 
book-keepers, business men, and advanced 
accountancy students, by 

flf DAVID HOSKINS, C.A. 

Vice-President of the Institute of Chartered 
Accountants of Ontario. 

Price $1.50, postpaid. Address :— 

DAVID HOSKINS, C.A., 

Cor.'Yonge and McGill Sts., Toronto, Ont. 



THAT NEW SET 
OF BOOKS. 

"Burmese Linen Ledger" is the 
best paper for blank books — a splendid 
writing surface — erasable — durable and 
distinguished throughout for strength. 
Insist that your stationer give you 
books made with this famous paper. 



CANADA PAPER CO , Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL 



"BAILEY" BRAND CUTLERY 



SURPASSES ALL OTHER MAKES 



WRITE FOR 
CATALOGUE. 




FULLY WARRANTED. 
Shears, Scissors, Razors, and Butcher Knives, made by 

BAILEY CTJTLEET" CO., 

BRANTFORD, ONT. Limited 



CHAS. F. CLARK. President. JARED CHITTENDEN Treasurer. 

...ESTABLISHED 1849... 



T' 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices : Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results mayjustify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized 
world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial , fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 

OFFICES IN CANADA — 

HALIFAX, N.S. HAMILTON, ONT. LONDON, ONT. MONTREAL, QUE. 

OTTAWA. ONT. QUEBEC, QUE. ST. JOHN. N.B. TORONTO, ONT. 

VANCOUVER, B.C. VICTORIA, B.C. WINNIPEG, MAN. 

THOS. C. IRVING, Gen, Man, Western Canada, Toronto, JOHN A. FULTON, Gen. Man. Eastern Canada, Montreal. 





Inc. IMS 



Black Diamond File Works 

6. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve ,*^^^j^ Medals 




j Awarded 

By JURORS at 
t International Expositions 

Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 




■%-%^^%- J %-'V%^^%^k.-V%^^%.W'%^ 



I 



1902 




HOSE. '902 



We manufacture the most popular and best 
selling lines of Garden Hose in Canada. Our ''Mal- 
tese Cross" brand we confidently recommer, ? as 
the finest Garden Hose on the market. 

We have other grades not quite so expensive, 
but good reliable brands, viz. : "Lion" (the popular 
medium-priced hose), "King" "Sun" and "Leader." 

Our "Kinkproof" (wire wound) hose is wired 
by a special process controlled solely by ourselves, 
and is so constructed that it may be cut at any 
wind of the wire without loosening or uncoiling, 
the wire being self-gripping throughout each 
length. 



The Gutta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 



OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms 
45-47-49 West Front St. 



Factories— I 15-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



TORONTO, 



CANADA. 



BRITISH MANUFACTURED 

CASTOR OIL 



" n. O. M. CO." Brand. 

Cold Drawn Pharmaceutical, 
First Pressure, 
Second Pressure. 



From stock and to import. In barrels, 
and cases — 2 tins each. Special prices for 
import orders. 



B.& S.H.THOMPSON & CO, 

28 St. Sulpice St., MONTREAL, 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Houseline 
Hambrollne 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Sealine 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shlngleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Martin 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



'RED THREAD' 
hemp obtainable 



Transmission Rope from the finest quality M' ila 
, laid in tallow. ' 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 

■ ■ Limited 

Western Ontario Representative— 

wm. b. stewart, MONTR EAL, QU E. 

Tel 94. 27 Front St. West, TORONTO. 



Sells on its Merits, 

LANGWELL'S BABBITT 

MONTREAL. 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JANUARY II, 1902 '* 



NO. 2. 




S CUTLERY 



|5- 



FOR SALE BY LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES. 



1901 
1902 



Easily broke all records in the sale of 
'Queen's Head" Iron. 



Promises to be better still, opening with the 
largest tonnage ever on our books at the same 
date. 

Thanks to all our friends. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers. A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL, 
BRISTOL, ENG. Managers Canadian Branch. 



Our Fame Has Been Won in 
f^-World Competition. fi B 

We are starting out this year still far ahead in the race. We're likely to stay there, 
because we have something that can't be improved on — 

The "Safford" Radiator. 

It won fame against a world of com- 
petion. The joints of the "Safford" are its 
success — made without bolts or packing — 
can't leak. 

Any information you desire will be gladly 
given. Write for a little booklet on heating. 

The Dominion Radiator Co., Limited 

Head Office Dufferln St., 
TORONTO, CANADA. 

The Largest Radiator Manufacturers Under the British Flag. 





FELT 



Weather Strip 



DOORS i WINDOWS. 



FOOT WARMERS 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



Cor. King and Victoria Streets. ^_TORON 



[ C SUCIBIiE S 1 

| ^ j 

£ Nos. 1 8 to 60 in stock. 3 

p WRITE FOR PRICES. 3 

I i 

^- Samuel, Sons & Benjamin, London and Liverpool, Eng. ^m 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 



£ General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants. 3 

| 27 Wellington St. West, ^TORONTO, ONT. | 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



James Cartland & Son 

Manufacturers of every desciiption of Limited 

CABINET, BUILDERS', FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
1 BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND. 



CR.Co. Star 




London Showrooms : 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 




RED RUBBER PACKING 

FOR HIGH-GRADE WORK 



Good Packing Good Price 



Good Profits 



Good Advertising Matter 



Send for samples, prices and advertising matter. 



The Canadian Rubber Co. 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 




Our "YANKEE" Tool Book 
tells all about them. Mailed 
free on application 



No. 15. "Yankee Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 




ami—, 



No. 30. "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




No. 41. "Yankee" Automatic Drill," Eight Drill Points in Handle. 




No. 50. "Yankee " Reciprocating Drill, for Iron, Steel, Brass, Wood, etc. 



Manufactureis also oi 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chlppers. 

Fluting Machines, 

Hand Fluters. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 



No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 

Screw Driver. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Millions of pounds of "C" brand Horse Nails have 
been used in shoeing horses in Canada since 1865, and 
every pound has proved them to be the best Horse 
Nail made in Canada. They always give the farrier 
the most satisfactory results in every respect. They 
cost a trifle more, but are the most economical to use 
and the easiest for the merchant to sell. 

We thank every dealer who has sold "C" Horse 
Nails in 1901, and convey to them our sincere wishes 
for a Happy and Prosperous New Year. 

CANADA HORSE NAIL COMPANY, MONTREAL. 



TO THE TRADE : 



We quote the following prices 
for Incandescent Gas supplies : 

EACH. 

[Beacon Post Burners, ... 18c. 

No. 18, Incandescent Post Burners, - 15c. 

Beacon Gallery Burners, - - - 17c. 

No. 18, Incandescent Gallery Burners, - 14c. 

"Gloria" Triple-weave Mantles, - 15c. 

"United" Single-weave " » - lie. 

PER DOZ. 

Combination Chimneys, - - - $1.10 

Lighthouse "--..-•-- 1.10 

Best Lead Chimneys, small, - - 90c. 

Bulb Globes, all styles, - - - 110c. 

No. 74, Porcelain Crimp Shades, - l)0c. 

Crown Canopies, - 1.50 

31y " ... - 70c. 

Torches, - 125 

Wax Tapers, per dozen boxes, - 60c. 



Hoping to be favored with your 

orders. 

Yours truly, 

The United Incandescent Light Co., 

7 Vonge St. Arcade, - TORONTO. 

Phone Main 969. 



Opening the Season with a Full Assortment 




Churchs ALABASTINE. 



The only Wall-Coating that is extensively advertised 
and in demand. That is known to be permanent, 
because it has stood the test of time, and that sells-v 
on its own merits. ALL DEALERS will recognize the importance of having goods in stock when customerS"^ 
want them. Don't put off. Order early, to get and be able to give prompt service. Alabastine is ready for 
use by the addition of Cold Water, a feature that is protected by patents. Beware of imitations. Write The 
Alabastine Co., Limited, Paris, Ont., for special inducements to practical men. The trade supplied by 
Wholesale Hardware and Paint Dealers. Also by 

THE ALABASTINE CO., Limited, Paris, Ontario. 




ffTT 



'PAGE METAL GATES are solow in price 

no one can afford 
to use wooden ones. Light, and yet strong enough to sup- 
port a heavy man on the end while ha swings around the 
circle without causing them to sag. They are neat in 
- appearance, will last a lifetime. Will not sag nor get rickety. 
: ; . : SjEspS They are supplied, with latches which allow them to be open- 
li.^sESaSTS ed either way and are self acting. The only good metal gate 
that is low enough in price for general farm purposes. We also make Farm and Ornamental 
Fence. Poultry Netting, Nails and staphs. The Page Wire Fence Co. .Limited, Walkerville, Ont 1 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



Wholesale 
only 



37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. 

German Horse Clippers 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE 



(Henry Boker's) 





JAN, 17 is 



DANDY " Horse Clippers. " KEEN CUT " Horse Clippers. 
No. 1704 BALL BEARINGS. 




NEWMARKET" Horse Clippers. 



American Horse Clippers 



(Herman Boker's) 





THE "STAR POINTER." 



THE "XL. BALL BEARING." 




1902-The New Chicago Horse Clipping Machine-1902 




All Gearing cut from 
solid metal (not east). 



"Stewart's Patent." 
Knife and Handle Complete. 

PARTS. 
Without Handle. Top Plates. 

Handle Only. Bottom Plates. 




No Belts to Slip— Positive Power. It has a rigid base, 
tubular upright, and a fine, strong crank handle. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto. 



OUR PRICES 

ARE RIGHT 



Graham Wire and Cat Nails are the Best, 

Factory : Dufferln Street, Toronto. 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 

Manufacturers of the celebrated 



R 



122 



& 
HRS&C 

BARB and PLAIN 

GALVANIZED WIRE 

We make a Specialty of 

PLATED WARE, 
FRUIT KNIVES, ETC. 

Our Canadian Representative carries a full line 
of samples. 

Canadian Office : 

6 Ht. Sacrament St., MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 



WRIGHT'S 

Insect 
Sprayers 



PLAIN TIN, 
LACQUERED, 
ALL BEASS. 

'•BEST ON EARTH." 



Manufactured by 

E.T. WRIGHT & CO. 

HAMILTON, ONT , and 
MONTREAL, QUE. 

J. H. Hanson, Agent, Montreal. 



KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32, Canada Lifo Bldg., MONTREAL. 





Samples sent free on application,; 

Brand Horse - Nails 



HORSE NAILS-" C, 

Cauada Horse Nail Co. 

"BRASSITE" GOODS - 

Limited, Birmingham, Eng. 



Gunn Castor Co. 



THE INDEPENDENT CORDAGE CO , Limited, 



TORONTO. 



Highest Award Pan-American Exposition 

MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 

i' A s ;, L LA ROPE, Lath Yarn, Shingle Yarn, Hide Cord, BINDER TWINE 



Pulp Cord, Clothes Lines. 



Transmission Rope a specialty. 



SAW-SET 



HIGH- 




ASK YOUR HARDWARE MERCHANT FOR IT . 

TAKE NO OTHER. FAILING TO DO ITS g 
g WORK YOUR MONEY WILLBE RETURNED 
£ R.DILLON, OSHAWAont. S< 



DILLON'S 



SPECIALTIES : 

English Steel Scythes 
Saw Tools, Axes, etc, 



GRADB 



R. DILLON 

OSHAWA, ONT. 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NUN-EJECTINC. 



12 and 16 Gauges. 
Steel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
"Take 
Down" 
Cun Made. 




HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 

Also makers of H. & R. Revolvers, 
Catalog on request. Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 



STEVENS-MAYNARD J R - RIFLE 



The 

Young Gentleman's 

Rifle. 




The 

Young Gentleman's 

Rifle 



If you want the best cheap rifle ever made we have it in the Stevens-Maynard Jr. It 
will be a great Beller this year. Better place order now. 



The leading Jobbers handle Stevens products. 



t 



J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p O i* ox Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. 



I 

A 

I 



A London Fence Machine ?™zzz 



THEY SAVE 50 per cent. 

A lillle trouble lo introduce them will create a per- 
manent demand. One agency only in each town. 



Kinkora, Perth Co., July 15th., /go/. 
Gentlemen,—! have b en success Ju 1 in placing with 

farmers of this township about thirty London Fence 
Machines ana' a targe amount of other fence supplies. 
My patrons arc all ivcll pleased, and speak of the London 
as the best machine to build a good cheap fence. 1 expect 
to sell a great many more next season, as they cannot 
be beaten. 

I am, yours truly, D. HA RA GA N. 

Closest prices on Coiled Spring Wire to the trade, 

The London Fence Machine Co., 




Limited 
London, Ont. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HENRY DISSTON & SONS, 

Keys-tome Saw, Tool, Steel and File Works, 

PHILADELPHIA, PEININ., U.S.A. 




Orders intrusted to 

Lewis Bros. & Co., Montreal, 

will receive prompt attention. 



JAN ]] tqn2 






sgU<-%A T 'Vvf J ^ 




Saws of Every Description, 

Saw Filing Clamps, 

Cross Cut Saw Handles, 

Hand Saw Handles, 

Saw Gummers. 

Plastering Trowels, 

Brick Trowels ^, 

Etc., Etc. * rT r«" 



• ' l»r 



a* 



..« 



W 



<* 













vr 1 



.^ 




\ 



\ ' *™J 



,,r'"" 



<JV^ 



^ 



if^ 



.^i^ 






ri *r^ 



Plumbs and Levels, 
Try Squares, Bevels, 
Steel Rules, 
Speed Indicators, 
Trammel Points, 
Files and Rasps, Etc., Etc. 



Send us youi orders for 

SEASON 1902. 

LEWIS BROS. * CO., MONTREAL. 




LEWIS BROS. & CO. 



^GKEHSTTS. 



DVCOZLSTTIRIE^L. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Selling: Qualities 

Of our splendid range— 

]k Imperial Oxforc 

make them the most desirable stock you 
can handle. 

THEIR DIFFUSIVE FLUE CONSTRUCTION 
FRONT DRAW-OUT GRATE 
OVEN THERMOMETER 
DRAW-OUT OVEN RACK 

and other improved features, give them a quickly ap- 
preciated precedence over other ranges. 

Housewives everywhere praise them enthusiastically. 

Customers realize their superiority on sight — sales 
are easy. 

They're the popular range of Canada. 

Send us your Spring order now and be ready in time 
for early business. 



THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO,, Limited 

TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 




THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL. 



Incorporated 
1851. 



WESTERN 

H ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire and Marine 

Capital - - $2,000,000.00 
Assets, over - - 2,900,000.00 
Annual Income - 3,000,000.00 

Head Office: TORONTO. ONT. 



Hon. Geo. A. Cox, President. J.J. Kenny, Vice-President 
C. C. Foster Secretary. 



After Stocktaking 

in the quiet time is the opportunity to equip wilh 




Bennett's Patent Shelf Box 

Write for our new discount sheets containing 
lower prices and 7 varieties in Shelf Boxes. 

J. S. BENNETT, Patentee and Manufacturer, 

15 MARION ST., TORONTO 



IMPROVED STEEL WIRE TRACE CHAINS. 

Every chain guaranteed. Most profitable and satisfactory chain to handle. 




Improved Quality and Cheaper Prices for 1902. 

THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., limited 

HAMILTON, ONT., AND MONTREAL, QUE. 



Dundas Axes 

One customer writes : " We have found 
your Axes the best we have ever handled." 
Another writes : " Duplicate the shipment 
made us July 4th." Another says : " We 
sell the 'Crown Jewel' at $1.00 and it 
goes every time." 

DUNDAS AXE WORKS 

Dundas, Ont. 

W. L. Haldimand, Jr., Agent, Montreal. 



The Robin Hood 
Powder Company 

If you want the best Trap or Game load'n. 
the world, buy "Robin Hood Smokeless," 
in " Robin Hood " Shells. It is quick, safe, 
and reliable. Try it for pattern and pene- 
tration from forty to seventy yards against 
any powder on the market. We make the 
powder, we make the shells, and we load 
them. Write for our booklet, " Powder 
Facts." 

The Robin Hood Powder 
Company — 

SWANTON, VT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



AMERICAN SCYTHES. 

Hubbard & Blake's i „ , . , . . .. 
and Isaiah Blood's I Celebrated Scythes 

PRICES NO HIGHER THAN CANADIAN-QUALITY BETTER. 

If you want them and your Jobber has not got them write to us. 



Itios. C, Collins & Sons 

301 St. James St. 

MONTREAL 

SALES AGENTS FOR CANADA. 



American Axe & Tool Co, 

253 BROADWAY, 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 



LOCKS and BUILDERS' 



Catalogues and price list mailed on 
application. 

THE LARGEST MAKERS 
IN THE DOMINION. 



Hade in great variety of 
design and finish. 




The Gurney-Tilden Co., Limited, - Hamilton, Canada. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



We are now mailing our 1902 
Illustrated Catalogue and Price 
List — acknowledged to be the 
most up-to-date in the trade. 

If you do not receive a copy, 
drop us a card. 



The Imperial Varnish & 
Color Company, Limited 

TORONTO, ONT , CANADA 



Do not close for next season's paint 
until our travellers have had a chat 
with you. We will have the ground 
covered thoroughly in good time for 
the Spring trade. 



tt 



ARK 

BRAND 

PAINT" 



is establishing itself with the best 
Canadian merchants, because its 
quality backed by our guarantee 
makes it easy to sell. You will handle 
it too when you learn more about it. 



-i* 



■♦ FRANCIS-FROST C\ 



imited 



TORONTO. 



Canadian Distributing Agents for Grippin's Crack Filler. 



KEMPS Broad Hoop 

Roll Rim Milk Can Bottoms 

possess all the points which go to make perfection in Can Bottoms. 
They have been used by a criticizing public for three seasons, and 
their popularity is evidence of the satisfaction which they gave. 
The Roll Rim has no sharp turns which break the grain of the 
metal and lessen its wearing qualities. It has a broad wearing 
surface and will not damage floors. They do not cost more than an 
inferior Bottom. The IRON-CLAD TRIMMINGS are made the 
same as the broad hoop, and differ from them only in having a 
narrower and thicker hoop which does not require the 
Roll Rim. and, therefore, can be sold cheaper. For 
durability and finish our trimmings are unequalled. 

Manufactured by 

KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., 

TORONTO, CANADA. 







VOL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JANUARY II, 1902. 



NO. 2. 



President : 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. 

The Mad can Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 



MONTRKAl. 

Toronto 
London, Eng. 
Manchester, Em 
Winnipeg 



offices, 

- 232 McGill Street, 
Telephone 1255. 

10 Front Street East. 

Telephone 2701. 

100 Fleet Street, !'..( '. 

W. H, Miln. 

- 18 St. Ann Street. 
1 1 S. Ashburner. 

- Western Canada Block. 
J.J. Roberts. 

Vancouver, B.C. liack Block. 

|. A. Macdonald. 
Si Ji>hn, N.B. - - No. "3 Market Wharf. 

|. Hunter White. 
NEW YORK - Room 442 New York Life Bldg. 

Subscription. Canada and United States, 82.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 128. 

Published every Saturday. 

_'., , ,, (Adscript, London. 

Cable Address } Adscr £ t , Canada. 



WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT IN THIS PAPER 



TORONTO LOSES A GOOD CITIZEN. 

BY the death of the late Walter S. Lee 
Toronto loses a good citizen whom 
she can ill afford to lose. He was 
a type of the man all too rare in this 
Canada of ours. A business man every 
inch of him, yet a public man esteemed by 
all shades of politicians, and respected by 
all classes of citizens. 

The greater part of his useful life was 
spent in that great school of finance and 
commercial training, the loan and savings 
institutions, to say nothing of the experience 
he gained in his connection with the Board 



of Trade, the Toronto and Nipissing Rail- 
way and the Toronto Industrial Exhibition 
Board. In 1864 he became manager of 
the Western Canada Loan and Savings Co., 
and 23 years later managing-director. At 
the time of his death he was the general 
manager of the Canada Permanent and 
Western Canada Mortgage Corporation, the 
company that was formed in 1899 as a result 
of the amalgamation of the Canada Per- 
manent Loan and Savings Co., the Freehold 
Loan and Savings Co., the Ontario and 
London Loan and Investment Co., and the 
Western Canada Loan and Savings Co. 

Great as were the demands of his busi- 
ness connections upon him, the late Mr. 
Lee took a great deal of interest in the 
affairs of the city of Toronto, and particu- 
larly in its educational institutions. For 35 
years he was a member of the Public School 
Board, during several years of which he 
occupied the honored position of chairman. 
And on Monday last his name was on the 
ballot paper for reelection, he having died 
near midnight on Saturday, and after the 
ballots had been printed. He also served 
some years as a member of the Collegiate 
Institute Board, and the chair there fell to 
his honor. The presidency of the old 
Mechanics' Institute and the chairmanship 
of the Toronto General Hospital were 
among the many other public positions 
which were bestowed upon him. 

The deceased came from good commer- 
cial stock, his father, the late Aid. Joseph 
Lee, being a general merchant in York. 
Messrs. A. B. Lee, president of Rice Lewis 
& Son, Limited ; Thomas H. Lee, whole- 
sale jeweller, and Alexander Lee, of The 
Copp, Clark Co., are brothers of deceased. 



As a business man the reputation of Mr. 
Lee was high, and as a public man no one 
in Toronto was more respected. 



CANADA AND CORONATION 
MEMENTOES. 

MANUFACTURERS and others in 
Great Britain are busy preparing 
novelties and mementoes for the 
coronation festivities, and in the trade and 
daily newspapers are to be found many 
advertisements drawing attention to the 
different lines. 

It is certain that a demand will be found 
in this country for some mementoes of the 
occasion, an occasion new in the experience 
of most of us. But, as far as we can learn, 
nothing is being done by the home manu- 
facturers to cater to the demand. If they 
intend doing anything it is high time they 
were beginning. 

And not only does it appear to us that 
the manufacturers of this country should 
make preparations for the home trade, but 
it is possible that something might be done 
in the British market as well. 

Canada is just now much in the public 
eye in the Mother Country, and ingenious 
manufacturers ought to be able to devise a 
number of lines emblamatic of the Dominion 
which would sell readily in the United 
Kingdom while the coronation proceedings 
were occupying the public mind. 

There is, however, no time to lose. Those 
who would act must act now. 



A good many men are cyphers in the 
world because they have not the ambition 
to cut a figure in it. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE BINDER TWINE OUTLOOK. 

PRICES on binder twine for the ensuing ment 4f6c higher. Sisal fibre is 7.yi to 

season have not yet been issued by 2^c. higher than a year ago. 

the Canadian makers ; but it is That the out i ok, not only for binder 

expected they will be in about ten days or twine( but all other products of sisal and 

two weeks. We have not been able to m anila fibre, is strong, is quite evident, 

ascertain what they will be. One thing, 

however, seems certain, they are not likely CONFERENCES BETWEEN BUSINESS 

. . MEN AND THEIR EMPLOYES. 

to be low. 

„ . . . , r /^""xUITE a number of manufacturers 

Stocks earned over from the season of f 1 

., „ . , \ J an< i other classes of business men 

1 90 1 are unusually small ; in fact, we V^ g 

.,,.,.—.. ^^ hold conventions with their travel- 

understand they are practically nil. This, 

, , , . , lers » heads of departments and other 

of course, is the result of the heavy grain 

, ., ' , , „, , „, . employes during the holiday season when 

crop of Manitoba and the Northwest Tern- 
trade is quiet. It is surprising that more 
tones, when every pound that could be pro- 
do not do so. 
cured was wanted. 

When we see that the firms most zealous 

The season was also an unusually good one ... .. . , 

in this particular are those that are the most 

in the United States. The Cordage Trade , r , , 

progressive and successful we cannot but be 
Journal, of New York, in its issue of , ... • '. . ,. 

J impressed with the idea that such conven- 

January 2, says that the "binder twine .. . . . , r , 

J ' tions must be helpful. 

business for the harvests of 1002 will be ... , . . . 

We do not claim that to these conventions 
practically all confined to the year 1902, . . .. . .. , , 

' * must be ascribed the success of the firms 

for the new year opens with few sales of ... . ., .. _. 

c with whom they are peculiar. They are the 

twine for delivery this season actually , , . ., , ....,/. 

1 J outward and visible sign that the firms who 

made." The same authority says that no _ „ .... .. , 

' annually utilize them are of a progressive 

general quotations have yet been made by . ,. , .. . , .... .. 

ft n J ' type and possess the wisdom to utilize the 

even the largest factors, but gives the fol- . .. , ,, . „ , 

b b opportunity of meeting their travellers and 

lowing as the nominal figures f.o.b. eastern . , , , . , 

6 & heads of departments at least once a year 

" and discussing ways and means of promot- 

White sisal (500 ft. to lb.) 10 to ioKc. in? business 

Standard (500 ft. to lb.) 10 to ioJ£c. 

Standard manila (550 ft. to lb.) .... 10$* to n c. We believe that this is a principle which 

Manila (600 ft. to lb.) 12 % to 13 c. j s applicable to all business houses, no 

Pure manila (650 ft. to lb. ) 13^ to 13'Ac. 

matter whether their employes be many or 
By far the most important feature of the . , „ 

few ; in fact, the smaller they are the more 
situation is the strength of the fibre market. ... ., , . .-■.,._ 

readily can the machinery be handled. For 
Referring to this, The Cordage Trade . . ., . ... 

example, a retail merchant could have a 

Journal says: "Those who do not lose ,-.., , ... .. . . . . 

' little conference with his clerks, drivers 

track of events in the fibre market after ., n . ... ..... 

and bookkeepers once a week with little or 

they have purchased their binder twine, A . .. 

' v 'no inconvenience to anyone. At these 

know that the price of sisal fibre began to c . , ■ ., 

r * s « », conferences such subjects as the most 

advance in August last, before the lowest sa , ab , e and profitablfi goods tQ hand , e . the 

figures of the previous year had been best methods of dealing ^ certain 

touched, and that manila fibre quotations customers> and ideas for window dressLng 

started advancing in September. Since the and advertising might be discussed with 

advances were inaugurated there has been advantage to both emp i oyer and employe . 

no important weakness shown by either But tbesc are only a few of ^ many 

fibre. In a few weeks the quotations for subjects that might be discussed . 
both manila and sisal had reached figures whether such conferences are held at 

higher than were touched at any time be- short or , ong intervalSj a definite time 

tween July 1, 1900, and July 1. 1901." should be fixed for ho , ding them WUh 

The spot price of manila fibre in New the time fixed, all would be looking forward 

York is 3^ to 3^c. per lb. higher than it to it, and in looking forward they would 

was at the beginning of 1901, and for ship- also be fortifying themselves with sugges- 



tions and schemes. Some tangible recog- 
nition of such suggestions and ideas as are 
deemed the most practicable for the firm to 
adopt would undoubtedly stimulate the 
efforts of the employes. 

We would like to hear from some oV our 
readers in regard to this suggestion. We 
invite clerks and others, as well as em- 
ployers, to contribute. 



DECLINES IN BUILDERS' HARDWARE 

A number of American travellers have 
been on the Montreal market during the past 
week, and the prices they quote on builders' 
hardware are, in many cases, lower than 
those now prevailing. Prices in this market 
will, of course, be altered to suit those 
quoted by representatives of American 
houses, so that on some lines we may 
expect declines in prices in the near future. 
These will not likely be very marked, but, 
such as they are, they will be welcomed by 
retailers. Just what lines will be affected by 
this it is difficult at present to determine. 
In a few instances, in fact, the new quota- 
tions given are higher. 



IMPORTANT CHANGES IN WHITE 
LEAD. 

Quite an important change is announced 
this week in the price of white lead. In 
Montreal, the price has been reduced i2^c. 
per 100 lb., and in Toronto, 25c. per 100 lb. 
By this arrangement prices are the same at 
Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London, Windsor, Ont.; St. John, N.B., 
and Halifax, N.S. Formerly, it will be 
remembered, there was a difference of I2^c. 
between eastern and western points. 

Quotations f.o.b. the above points are 
now : Pure, 55.87^ ; No. 1, 55.50 ; No. 
2, $5.i2j£ ; No. 3, $4-75 I No - 4. 34-37J& 
per 100 lb. These quotations are for any 
quantity, except for packages of less than 
25 lb. 

DROPS FROM THE EDITOR'S PEN. 

The out-of-date man is twin brother to the 
lazy man. 

He who imitates is usually lacking in 
brains sufficient to initiate. 

A man without ambition, like an engine 
without steam, is stationary. 

Market reports are guiding stars to 
merchants who watch them. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



TRADE IN COUNTRIES OTHER THAN OUR OWN. 



IRON TRADE SITUATION. 

1* HE new year opens with the iron 
trade still under the pains of 
« prosperity and destined to be hob- 
bled for many weeks by the breaking 
down of transportation agencies. There 
has been little in the developments of the 
week to suggest the closing of a year's 
business. Buying has gone right on and 
the iron trade has crossed the line under 
a pressure ordinarily found in the active 
consuming period of the year. Not that 
the buying is what it was some weeks 
ago, but the comparison is with the 
quiet time that usually precedes inven- 
tory. The coke embargo upon blast fur- 
naces has reached an acute stage. In the 
Chicago district 11 furnaces were idle 
early this week, in the Mahoning and 
Shenango Valleys, 20, in the Pittsburg 
district 12, of Southern Ohio 3, several 
in Virginia and Alabama, in Cleveland 2, 
while in other districts there is a light 
cutting off of production by banking for 
a portion of the week. The locomotive 
works, which are now driven to their ut- 
most, must be looked to for relief. The 
market activity of the week has been 
shared by all lines except the few affected 
by the season. Pig iron has advanced, 
Bessemer, foundry and gray forge selling 
from 25 to 50 cents higher. Buying of 
smaller quantities of Bessemer has fol- 
lowed the large contracts reported last 
week, and 816. Valley furnace, is now 
the basis for round lots, as high as $16.- 
50 in the Valley being paid. Basic iron 
has advanced to §15.75. Valley furnace, 
northern grav forge to 815 at furnace, 
and Mo. 2 foundry to 815.50 at Valley 
furnace. Southern furnaces that have 
maintained $11.50 at furnace for No. 2 
followed the advance of the minority on 
Mondav of this week, and now quote $12. 
Though foundries were supposed to have 
covered generally for the first half there 
is still considerable buying, some of it 
for the entire year, with indications that 
not a few are contracting to make sure 
of deliveries, rather than to cover con- 
tracts in hand. It was only so recently 
as 1899 that this sort of buying left the 
furnaces practically without new business 
through the following year.— Iron Trade 
Review. January 2. 

OILS, PAINTS AND DRUGS IN 1901. 

Tn its review of the oil, paint, drug, 
chemical, dyestuffs and kindred trades in 
1001 The Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter 
notes that as the year 1901 advanced and 
the business of each month was compared 
with that of the corresponding month of 
the year preceding it was found that 
there had been a train, and the close of 
the year proves 1901 to have been a re- 
cord' vear, exceeding all its predecessors 
for the volume of business and the pros 
perous condition of the merchants and 
manufacturers of the country. The year 
has been notable for the discovery of 
new processes, labor-saving devices, and 
by the largely increased volume of trade. 
Taking the principal trades separately, it 
is found that while speculative^ opera- 
tions have not been so large as in pre- 
vious years, there has been a healthy 
growth' in the purchase and sale of 
drugs, while both the exports of indig- 
enous drugs and manufactured products 
and the imports from foreign countries 
show a goodly gain. In the lineof chem- 
icals there has been an extraordinary in- 



crease in production of some articles, 
thus displacing large quantities which 
had formerly been imported. The ' con- 
sumption of nearly all classes of chem- 
icals has increased at a rate far exceeding 
the increase shown by an> preceding 
year, while the larger number of estab- 
lishments is evidence of this growth. The 
manufacturers of and dealers in dyestuffs 
have also cause for congratulation, 
though the increase in this line has not 
been so great. The manufacture of vari- 
ous new dyeing materials, however, has 
kept well abreast of the times. The 
trade in paints, which early in the year 
was feared would not prove so satisfac- 
tory as during the year preceding, in- 
creased later, and for once the old saying 
that " trade once lost cannot be recov- 
ered " appeared at fault. The general 
prosperity extended to paints perhaps a 
little tardily, but the almost universal 
report now is that the volume of busi- 
ness of the past year greatly exceeds that 
of the year preceding. To find the in- 
crease in the oil business it is only neces- 
sary to glance at the record of exports, 
and that there has been a large increase 
in home consumption may be taken with- 
out saying. A continuance of satisfactory 
conditions is looked for. 

FINISHED MATERIALS IN ENGLAND. 

There are few, if any, fresh develop- 
ments to report in the market for finished 
materials. The position of makers at the 
end of this year is not entirely satisfac- 
tory, for although they have a fair num- 
ber of orders on hand still, yet the new 
business coming forward lately, has not 
been of sufficient weight to warrant any 
very confident views as to the course of 
trade on the resumption of business after 
the holidays. In some districts the com- 
petition of Continental and even Can- 
adian material is being felt a good deal. 
In Manchester, for instance, the effect of 
Canadian competition on local brands is 
widely discussed. It is pointed out that 
the $2 bounty given by the Dominion 
Government, practically covers the cost 
of carriage to this country, and Can- 
adian makers are, consequently, put in a 
position to compete keenly with the Eng- 
• lish manufacturer. There is no change to 
note in the bar trade, except that as we 
noted last week the demand for common 
iron in South Staffordshire seems to be 
falling away a little ; but the basic price 
is still maintained at £7, although buyers 
are offering less, and best bars are selling 
fairly well at the full figure— £8 10s.— 
Iron and Coal Trades' Review. 

PIG IRON IN GREAT BRITAIN. 

The most notable feature of the pig- 
iron market during the past week, per- 
haps, was flie remarkable collapse in 
Scotch warrants on Friday of last week, 
which was attributed to the tragic death 
of a well-known London metal broker, 
followed by an announcement of the fail- 
ure of a well-known London firm. The 
market was apparently " hammered " by 
bears at Glasgow, and Scotch warrants 
went down to 48s. 7^d. cash, as against 
55s. 7-kl., the quotation in our last 
issue— a drop of 7s. in little more than a 
day. Cumberland warrants were also 
affected, and have not since recovered. 
In regard to makers' iron, trade during 
the few days during which business was 
done, was not brisk, and prices remained 



at about the same level ; but had for 
the most part a somewhat weaker ten- 
dency. Not only ordinary pig, but hema- 
tite, has developed a slow tone, and pri- 
ces show little of the strength which 
marked them up till about a fortnight or 
three weeks ago, when the fall which has 
since taken place commenced. There is a 
scarcity of grey forge pig in the Cleve- 
land district, and buyers have been pay- 
ing for it as much as they will give for 
No. 3.--Tron and Coal Trades' Review. 

WELSH TINPLATE TRADE. 

With the exception of stoppages for 
coal, the Welsh tinplate trade is said to 
have never been brisker than at the pre- 
sent time. The most satisfactory feature 
of this industry is stated to be the de- 
velopment which has taken place in the 
direction of seeking new markets for tin- 
plates. It is confidently believed that 
after the conclusion of the war, there will 
be a splendid market opened in South 
Africa. The smelting works at Briton 
Ferry steelworks and at the Albion works 
at the same place are reported to be in 
full operation, which is the case with the 
tinplate works in the same locality. — Iron 
and Coal Trades' Review. 



DEATH OF MR. G. CRAWFORD. 

The Canada Paint Co., Limited, record 
with deep sorrow the decease of their 
esteemed representative, Mr. Gabriel 
Crawford, which took place at his home, 
St. John, N.B., on the 6th inst. 

Mr. Crawford's fine personality and 
sterling integrity endeared him to many 
friends, who are deeply sensible of the 
loss sustained by his death. 

The officials and travellers of The Can- 
ada Paint Co. feel the passing of Mr. 
Crawford very keenly, as he was ex- 
tremely popular, not only with them but 
with every employe of the company. His 
name was a household word throughout 
the Maritime Provinces, and The Domin- 
ion Travellers' Association, of Montreal, 
lose an active worker and friend, he hav- 
ing been connected with that organiza- 
tion for 17 years. 

Mr. Robert Munro, manager of the com- 
pany, left on Tuesday, to attend the 
funeral at St. John. 



THE LATE MR. RUTLEDQE. 

There passed away in Toronto at an 
early hour on Monday, the 6th instant, 
one of the best-known hardwaremen in 
Canada, in the person of Henry George 
Hut ledge. Several months ago deceased 
received a paralytic stroke, from which 
he never fully recovered, and on the 1st 
instant still another was received. This 
one proved fatal. 

Deceased was for many years buyer for 
M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co., retir- 
ing from that position a couple of years 
ago when that firm sold out the hard- 
ware branch of its business and confined 
itself to metals. 

The announcement of his death will be 
received with a great deal of regret, not 
only by the hardwaremen in Canada, but 
by a good many manufacturing firms in 
the United States who were brought into 
contact with him during his many years 
of active connection with the wholesale 
hardware trade. 

At the time of his death the deceased 
was in his 63rd year. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HOW BUSINESS SUCCESS MAY BE WON IN THE 
TWENTIETH CENTURY. 



By Charles R. Flint 

THE specialist will be the dominat- 
ing force in the business world of 
the 20th century. The road to 
success lies along that line. Let the 
young man who starts out in life to-day 
or to-morrow concentrate on one thing, 
and he has the golden key. 

The day of the all-round man is over. 
New conditions have come into business 
life ; and they have come to stay. These 
new conditions are unfavorable to the 
man who can do half a dozen things. He 
must master one business. 

UNDER THE READJUSTMENT 

there is no place for the all-round man. 
Nobody wants him. nobody cares for his 
peculiar kind of ability. Industries have 
been rearranged. They are now separated 
into departments instead of plants. At 
the head of each department is wanted 
a man who knows all about this particu- 
lar division, who has concentrated his 
entiie mind and ability on its require- 
ments and possibilities, who is, in fact, 
a highly trained, highly developed spe- 
cialist. Men like these are scarce to-day. 
Hundreds of institutions are looking for 
them. Salaries ranging from $5,000 to 
§15,000 are waiting for them. My own 
concern is looking for half a dozen spc 
cialists to-day. rubber men, lumber men, 
etc. We would cheerfully pay them 85,000, 
a year, and even more cheerfully $15,000. 
for a $15,000 man is a great deal more 
valuable to his concern than the $5,000 
man. But he has got to be a $15,000 
man. Naturally he is not plentiful. 

Business in a concrete form has existed 
as long as the world's record runs , and 
until recently its course of development 
has been practically the same as in the 
beginning. Now, however, we are sud- 
denly 

FACE TO FACE WITH A NEW SCHEME 

There has been a complete revolution. It 
is doubtful if the mass of the people ap- 
preciate this, yet it is palpable to the 
man who has his eyes open as is tin- 
knowledge that to-day electricity is the 
motive power of the world. Tn a few 
years we shall wonder that we continued 
in our own time the crude business sys 
tern of our forefathers. 

Let no man delude himself with the 
belief that we shall ever again go back 
to the old methods. As soon might we 
expect to see the electric cars put away 
in the sheds to give way to the old 
stages. And unless the boys who arc 
starting out in business life appreciate 
this and train themselves accordingly. 
they will be woefully handicapped. 

THE NEW METHOD 

i- the scientific, the civilized one. It is 
built on the knowledge of the interdepen 
dence of men. It explodes the fallacy of 
" independence." There can be no inde- 
pendence in the world except among 
savages ; the wild man is the only human 
being who is really independent. The 
moment yon get away from the savage 
state you leave independence behind. All 
government, all society are interdepen- 
dent. The new business idea, call it the 
trust," if you will, recognizes this prin- 
ciple and develops it to its highest form. 



In Saturday Evening Post. 

That this recognition did not come long 
ago simply argues a backward mental 
state. The old order of " independence " 
in business ranks with the times when 
every baron was independent, when he 
levied on the crops of his feudal retain- 
ers and was the master of their lives and 
families. As constitutional, scientific 
government has come to supplement the 
feudal system, so the " consolidation 
era " in business has come to supplant 
the old system. 

CONSOLIDATION IN BUSINESS 

has bred the demand for the specialist, 
and as consolidation grows, as it will, 
the demand for specialists will grow. 
That it is subversive of independence and 
manhood is absurd. The man who 
directs a department for a big corpora- 
tion to-day is more independent than he 
could possibly be under the old condi- 
tions when he went into business for him- 
self. He is not worried with the financial 
troubles and a thousand-and-one details 
that consumed his time without adequate 
return. He devotes all the time he has 
to that which he can do the best. Natur- 
ally the result is higher production, and 
a consequent betterment for the world 
dependent on production. Nor does the 
new systen make for concentration of 
wealth, as is so generally stated. The 
reverse is the fact. Out of my experi- 
ence this is proven. When I was in 

BUSINESS UNDER THE OLD SCHEME 

there were two profit sharers in the 
firm, my partner and myself. Everybody 
else connected with our business was a 
salaried employe. They had no share in 
the earnings. Everything they produced 
they produced for us. Later another 
partner was added, but there we remain- 
ed. And what is the condition now ? I 
have 300 partners, men who share in the 
profits of the concern, and who are in- 
terested in preventing losses. Last year 
$150,000 in profits was divided among 
the heads of departments with us. Our 
clerks own $fi0,000 worth of stock in our 
establishment. Carnegie, the greatest 
business man in the world, has 32 part- 
ners, young men, who, having demon 
si rated their fitness for special lines of 
work, were given interests. And we arc 
in the infancy of the new order of thing-. 

THE CORPORATE SYSTEM. 

Such a distribution of interest is im- 
possible only under a coipoiate system. 
No man in his senses would dare risk 
business association with 300 men under 
the old partnership plan, where anyone 
of the 300 might involve the firm. There 
fore the business remained a close corpo 
ration : the good things were distributed 
among relatives when they were distri 
buted at all. Now everybody comes in 
on his merits. There are stock allot- 
ments, so that the able, frugal, pains 
taking man may almost any time acquire 
an interest. That this works to the in- 
terest of the man controlling the corpo- 
ration is made evident from the better 
service we get. Almost any evening yon 
may see clerks at work in our office. 
They put in this overtime because of the 
interest they take in the affairs of the 
house under the new conditions. It is 



never required of them that they work 
out of hours. It is entirely voluntary. 

ALL WORK FOR THE GENERAL SUCCESS 

All these things work for the general 
success of the business by the modern 
methods, and they emphasize the neces- 
sity of preparing to work under the me- 
thods. Naturally where there are great 
consolidations the work must be system 
ized. Production falls into departments, 
and at the heads of these departments 
must be specialists. The science of con- 
solidation is not to bring competing in- 
terests together in order that prices may 
be raised. That is a foolish system and 
can only beget more competition. A 
combination to be persistently successful 
must be so managed that the same goods 
or better goods, may be produced at 
lower prices. This can only be brought 
about by scientific supervision. And there 
is the source from which springs the de- 
mand for expert specialists. It is for the 
young men to take advantage of this 
demand. 

Of course, the young man who starts 
out with an inherited fortune is not con- 
strained to follow this plan. He can 
diversify his interests. It is the part of 
wisdom for him to do so. He protects 
himself if he is not dependent on one in 
dustry alone. But even a rich man's son 
might very well train himself as a high 
class specialist. It will give him knowl 
edge and power that in after life may 
prove exceedingly useful. 

AN EXAMPLE. 

• I. .1. Hill, President of The Great 
Northern Railway, is a magnificent ex- 
ample of the possibilities that lie before 
a specialist. Mr. Hill is a specialist, has 
always been a specialist, lie has devoted 
his entire time, attention and ability to 
railroading. He is to-day the greatest 
railroad operator in the world. There is 
nothing about the business that he 
doesn't know thoroughly. He has stud- 
ied the business from A to Z, and is 
master of all its details. Thanks to this 
thorough knowledge Mr. Hill has made 
himself one of the richest men in 
America. 

t'apital is always eager to associate 
itself with such men, but capital is 
mighty shy in having to do with men 
who are not master specialists. In my 
own case I always insist that my asso 
ciates shall be specialists. I am always 
open to a good business enterprise, but 1 
make sure that the men who are to 
handle the enterprise know all about it. 
And I also insist that they go into noth- 
ing else, ft is distinctly stipulated in all 
our business contracts that the men in 
charge of our lumber interests have no 
other interests, that our rubber men con- 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment. 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



fine themselves to rubber, and so all 
along the line. It is to this rule and its 
enforcement that J attribute much of the 
success we have met with in our busi- 
ness enterprises. It has brought and 
holds for us a class of thoroughly train- 
ed specialists whose minds dwell continu 
ally p the one thing in which they are 
engaged. Thus we get better results than 
do concerns whose managers have to 
diversify themselves. 

AMBITION. 

Everybody who amounts to anything 
is ambitious. He wants to yet. to the 
top, to become rich, to control things ; 
to be a power. This laudable ambition 
under the new way of the business world, 
will prove exceedingly dangerous if it 
leads the young man into general indus 
tries. In the formation period it was 
possible for men to go into different 
things and carry them through success 
fully. 1, myself, for example, without 
any particular qualifications as a special 
ist, have been enabled to aid in organk 
ing a number of diverse industries. But 
the situation with me was peculiar ami 
unusual. I had been for years a member 
of a large commission firm which was the 
largest buyer in the United States of 
general manufactures for export. We 
handled evetything from needles to loco 
motives. When the era of consolidation 
came I was in a position to deal intelli 
gently as the representative of the differ 
ent interests. I knew all the principals 
from years of business association, and. 
in a superficial way, I was familiar with 
the requirements and shortcomings of the 
various industries. 

Now the formation period is practi 
eally over. We have settled down to 
doing business under the new plan. We 
have done very well so far; we are goin 
right along the same line. Nothing ran 
stop the development and expansion of 
the new trade scheme. The business of 
the world is going to be divided up more 
and more into departments. 

Success is to be won in getting al the 
head of one of the departments. 1 1 is 
the 20th century method. 



MARRIAGE OF A HARDWAREMAN'S 
DAUGHTER. 

THERE was an interesting home wed 
ding in Tottenham, on December 
26, when Maude, (lie only daugh 
ter of L. I*. Foucar, hardware merchant, 
was married Lo Mr. II. .1. Strong, of 
Windsor, Out. The ceremony took place 
in the parlor, which was softly lighted by 
candles and decorated with holly, a sprig 
of mistletoe being suspended immediate!) 
above the bride. Rev. Mr. 1. Couch was 
the officiating clergyman. Miss Nellie 
Large, of Alliston, acted as bridesmaid, 
and Mr. Strong was assisted by his 
Jprother, Albert, of Toronto. As the bride 

entered the drawing room Lohengrin's 

wedding march was played with beautiful 
effect by Miss Maude Strong, sister .if the 

groom. The bride was gowned ill her 
travelling suit of navy blue camel's hair 
cloth and tucked with white taffeta 
blouse with chiffon appliqtte trimmings, 
and carried a shower bouquel ot white 

' mums ' and sacred lilies. llei going 

awaj dress included a navy blue taffeta 
silk blouse Her hat was of white camel's 
hair felt, trimmed with navy blue panne 
velvet and white dove and ospreys. The 
bridesmaid was attired in a pale blue 



Wise Preparation 



for the painting season that will soon be here, 
means a good stock of 

The Sherwin-Williams Paint 

We are planning for the biggest year we have ever 
known. We believe there will be more painting done this 
year than ever before, and we mean to get our share of the 
business. We have prepared for a big season. 

If you join with us you can get the lion's share of the 
trade in your locality. We'll give you the methods and 
advertising to get it and the paint to hold it after you 
once get it. 

There's money for you in our paint agency proposition. 
If you want to investigate send for our "B-13 Booklet," 
free, but full of valuable information for wide-awake paint 
dealers. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 




CHICAGO, 
NEW YORK, 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND. 
NEWARK, BOSTON, SAN FRANCISCO. 

MONTREAL, TORONTO, KANSAS CITY. 




foulard silk gown. The groom's gift to 
the bride was an excellent fleurs-de-lis 
brooch, set with pearls, and to the 
bridesmaid a pearl stickpin. The bride 
was also the recipient of many handsome 
and useful presents. At the conclusion of 
the ceremony the bride and groom re- 
ceived the hearty congratulations and 
good wishes of those present, after which 
all sat down to a wedding dejeuner very 
daintly served by Mrs. Crossland, caterer, 
Barrie. The quests were only the near 
relatives and intimate friends of the con- 
tracting parties, and included the follow 
ing : Mr. and Mrs. J. 6. Strong, Mrs. ('. 
Bingham, Mr. Arthur Strong and Mr. W. 
E. Buhner, of Toronto ; Miss Bertha 
\ieol, of Tottenham; Miss Da\ is l\\. 
Miss Pringle and Miss L. Elliott, New 
market : Mrs. Wickens, Barrie ; Mr. T. E. 
Langford, Shelburne ; Mr. J. McCullough 
and Mis. E. Munro, Hamilton ; Di'. Hog- 
gan, Windsor; Mr. and Mrs. K. E. 
Strong, Fernie ; Mr. and Mrs. W. L. 
Newsom, Vancouver, B.C. ; Mr. and Mrs 
W. K. Poucar, Bradford. After the lun- 
cheon a very enjoyable time was spent 

in c plimentary speeches and toasts and 

the happy couple departed amid a shower 
of good wishes extended in a very hearty 

w av 



TORONTO BOARD OF TRADE'S 
NEW SECRETARY. 

The Toronto Board of Trade has ap 
pointed Paul Jarvis, as secretary, to 
succeed Edgar A. Wills, who has resigned 
his position to accept a situation with 
Hiram Walker & Co., Walkerville, (In!. 
The new secretary will enter upon his 
duties on January 15. He was educated 
at Trinity College School, Port Hope, 
Ont., and Upper Canada College, To 
ronto. His business career was started 
in the Dominion Bank. He has been in 
Winnipeg, and also in Buffalo, where fa 
was chief accountant of The World Medi 
cal Dispensary Association, of Buffalo, 
and had charge of from 300 to 400 em 
ployes. 

Mrs. Gray was appointed as assistant 
eoretary. She has been in the secret- 
ary's office for nine years in the capacity 
of head clerk, and has proved herself a 
valuable and efficient official. 



ENTERTAINED THEIR TRAVELLERS. 

H. S. How land. Sons & Co entertained 
their travellers at luncheon on Saturdaj 
last at McConkey's, at the conclusion of 
which a conference on business matters 
was held. 



BAINES & PECKOVER. 

R. A. Baines. manufacturers' agent, 
has removed From 39 Sco (street to I "_* 1 
Bay street, Toronto. He has taken 
Mr C. li. Peek., i into partner- 
ship, under the style of Baines a 
Peekover. The firm will carry a larger 
stock of the different lines it handles, 
with the addition of wood screws. Che 
latter are made by lire Chalcraft Screw 
I " Brantford, Out., who have recently 
gone into that branch of manufacture. 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

THE B GREENING CO.'S CATALOGUE. 

We have received from The B. Greening 
Wire Co., Limited, ; an advance copy of 
their annual calendar for 1902. There is 
very little .hange in its make-up, the lead- 
ing features being good bold type that can 
be read from some distance. The extra 
spaces of each month are filled in with 
attractive cuts illustrating the principal 
seasonable lines of manufacture. 

We are pleased to hear that this enter- 
prising firm have had a very,; successful 
years' business and prospects are bright for 
the coming year. 

They report that some important changes 
are contemplated and being made. Con- 
tracts will be signed in a few days for the 
erection of fine new offices. Plans are 
being prepared for a large new paint tower 
that will contain all the latest improve- 
ments. They have just installed a new 
and up-to-date plant for the manufacture of 
poultry netting, lawn fencing, etc. Their 
last catalogue was issued in 1900 and 
should be in every hardware merchant's 
office. 

GREETINGS FOR THEIR FRIENDS. 

By way of extending their wishes and 
congratulations for the new year, the 
Dominion Radiator Co., Limited, Toronto, 
are issuing a neat and attractive folder and 
sending it to their friends and patrons. On 
the front cover is the picture of Old Time 
marching away with his sickle over his 
shoulder and his hour glass in his hand. In 
his rear is the figure of a red jacketed young 
woman standing fast to a Safford radiator. 
The motto engraved on it reads : * • Time 
Flies, Safford Stays Forever." 

SNOWDON & PATERSON'S CALENDAR. 

Snowdon & Paterson, manufacturers' 
agents, Montreal, who represent firms 
having headquarters in Toronto, Montreal, 
London, England, and Glasgow, Scotland, 
have issued a neat calendar this year with 
the names of the firms they are agents for 
and their lines of goods carried by them 
printed thereon, 

A VARNISH FIRM'S CATALOGUE. 

The Imperial Varnish and Color Co., 
Limited, Morse street, Toronto, make a 
specialty of manufacturing high grade 
varnishes. Their stock comprises all kinds, 
from the finest piano, boat and casket to 
agricultural implement and common house 
varnishes. Besides, they carry in stock a 
full line of dry colors, enamels and japans. 
Their new price list for 1902, just issued, 
has a neatly-embossed cover, with a neat 
design of a maple leaf and monogram in 



front, underneath is the firm's name in 
gold letters on 'a. bluish background, sur- 
rounded by a gold border. Inside are views 
of the company's premises and of the 
various departments from the filter and 
melting to the storage tank rooms. 

A USEFUL SOUVENIR. 

The Canada Hardware Co., Limited, 
Montreal, are distributing among their 
friends a neat and useful New Year's 
souvenir in the shape of a celluloid covered 
note-book. Besides blank space, it contains 
a good deal of interesting information of a 
general and particular nature. Readers of 
Hardware and Metal can secure copies 
upon inquiry, mentioning this paper. 



THE NEW MONTREAL SECRETARY. 

Mr. E. H. Cooper, who during the last 
18 months has been a member of the editor- 
ial staff of Hardware and Metal, 
in Montreal, has severed his connection 
with this paper for the purpose of assuming 
the secretaryship of the Montreal branch of 
the Canadian Manufacturers' Association. 
While regretting that Mr. Cooper has 
severed his connection with our staff, we 
must congratulate the Manufacturers' 
Association on securing his services. He is 
energetic and has a large fund of common- 
sense. This, with his journalistic and 
university training, should make him a 
valuable secretary to such an important 
body as the Canadian Manufacturers' 
Association. 



TRADING-STAAMP LAW IN FORCE. 

THE Act passed at the last session of 
the Ontario Legislature prohibiting 
the use of trading stamps went into 
force on January I. On that day the 
various offices of the Dominion Tiding 
Stamp Co. throughout Ontario were closed, 
and the following circular was sent out from 
the head office in Toronto to merchants 
using the stamps : 

To Merchants using our Trading Stamps : 

Gentlemen, — The statute prohibiting us giving, 
receiving or dealing with our trading stamps came 
into force this morning. The Court of Appeal has 
not yet delivered judgment on the question of the 
validity of the statute, and we find ourselves 
obliged by law to close our doors until such time 
as a decision is given and our right to continue 
business established. We must obey the law so 
long as it remains in force. In the event of judg- 
ment being given against us, we intend to appeal to 
the Supreme Court of Canada. We regret this 
delay, but cannot do anything to avoid it, 

In the meantime the trading stamp business will 
remain at a standstill. We wish you would kindly 
request your customers to retain all trading stamps 
they have on hand until the mat'er is definitely 
settled. 

You will please return any stamps you may have 
on hand, and pay for those used to our represen- 
tative presenting this letter. Hoping to obtain a 
favorable decision and resume business at an early 
date, we are, 

Yours truly, 

Dominion Trading Stamp Co. 



During this year nearly 17,000 bbls. of 
dynamite have been handled in Hull, 
Que., without a single accident. 



A DISSOLUTION. 

The firm of Lamplough & McNaughton, 
Montreal, has been dissolved and a new 
partnership registered. The business will 
be carried on as in the past, by F. W. 
Lamplough and J. P. McNaughton, under 
the same name, as agents for Theile & 
Quack, Hamburg, and other European 
manufacturers. 



PAST AND FUTURE 

THE PAST with us has been a prosperous and successful career of 31 years' stand- 
ing. During the time we have developed a large business and perpetuated for 
our products a lasting reputation. 

THE FUTURE will be an endeavor to surpass the achievements of past years, an en- 
deavor to enlarge the scope of our influence, and to create additional favor for 

Iver Johnson - Guns, 
Revolvers and Bicycles 

Each in its class represents the highest attainment of mechanical 
precision and completeness. They are the kind that 

Procure Public Patronage and Perpetuate Prosperity. 

IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS S CYCLE WORKS, 



New York OIHce- 

99 Chambers Street. 



FITCHBURG, MASS. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 




'(OF^ECfoND 



QUALITY OF ENGLISH LINSEED OIL. 

The Editor Hardware and Metal, — 
In your issue of January 4 I read an article 
in reference to English linseed oil of inferior 
grade being offered in this market, and, as 
one of the principal importers in Canada of 
English linseed oil, I feel it my duty to 
again refer to the matter through your 
valued columns with a view to relieving the 
minds of Canadian buyers generally from 
the erroneous impression they must natur- 
ally inherit from such a report. I have not 
heard of an inferior grade of English oil 
being offered in Canada and do not believe 
that any responsible firm would undertake 
to misrepresent the value or purity of such 
an article as linseed oil with a view to mak- 
ing sales, knowing that if they did, not 
only would they be liable for inevitable 
damages which would result from the use 
of adulterated oil but their reputation as 
linseed oil merchants would be gone for- 
ever. Furthermore, the Canadian trade is 
too wideawake these days to be taken in 
in such a manner, and I venture to say 
that not a single Canadian buyer of linseed 
oil would entertain doing business in an 
article as important as this with any outside 
firm or one whose reputation in the linseed 
oil trade is not already established. 

Our firm have been 111 the linseed oil 
trade for many years, and while we handle 
Canadian manufactured linseed oil very 
largely, we also buy and sell considerable 
English manufactured linseed oil. Our 
principal brand of the latter is "Stewart 
Bros. & Spencer's," which is well and 
favorably known throughout Canada, and 
invariably commands a higher price than 
any other make. ■§■ 

In justice to the above firm, whom we 
represent in Canada, as well as our own 
firm, as dealers in "genuine" linseed oil 
only, it devolves upon me to at once clear 
the atmosphere of these unreliable and 
damaging reports, and in my effort to do 
so request that you kindly publish this letter 
in your next issue. 

J. Watterson, 
Of J. Watterson & Co., Montreal. 
St. John, N.B., January 6, 1902. 



THEY ARE AMENABLE TO THE LAW. 

Editor Hardware and Metal : Will 
you kindly answer in the columns of your 
valuable paper the following question in 
reference to the early closing by-law ? 
About two years ago the merchants of this 
village attempted to introduce an early- 



closing system and circulated a petition 
among the business people of the town, 
agreeing to close their places of business 
at 7 o'clock every night except Wednesdays 
and Saturdays, and to petition the town 
council to pass a by-law to this effect, and 
on anybody found gulity of violating such 
by law a fine of not more than $20 and not 
less than $$ be imposed. The above 
petition was signed by all merchants. The 
town council seeing nobody opposed to it 
passed such by-law. Since then a number 
of new concerns have opened a place of 
business and refuse to comply with this by- 
law, and also a merchant who formerly 
signed the petition. Now, the question 
arises can they be forced to comply with 
this by-law ? By answering the above in 
your columns you will will greatly oblige, 

Merchant, 
New Hamburg, Ont., January 7. 

[Remarks : Provided the by-law has been 
properly carried there is no question about 
the question of conformity to it by those who 
move into the town subsequent to its adop- 
tion by the council. The fact that they 
were not party to the petition asking the 
town council to enact the by-law does not 
absolve them from obeying its provisions. 
If the sentiment of the majority of the 
storekeepers is against the by-law it may be 
repealed, but until such time as that is done 
everyone is legally bound to close his store 
at the stipulated hour. — The Editor ] 



MAY BUY FROM CANADA. 

H. Becker, of Becker & Hoag, a well- 
known financial house having offices in 
Berlin and Paris, is in Canada, where he 
has come to look very thoroughly into the 
graphite and corundum prospects of the 
country. The firm which he represents will 
open a large trade with this country, 
providing they turn out as good as he 
expects. Hitherto they have secured all 
their raw materials from the United States. 



A CASE OF COLOR. 

J. D. Young had some painting done at 
329 and 331 Markham street, Toronto. Wm. 
White did some work there for Young, and, 
as there was a dispute, sued him for $37 90. 
Young put in a counter claim of $8.22. 

The case came up before Judge Morson 
in the Division Court on January 9. Young 
claimed that White was to paint the doors a 
dark oak, while the fronts were to be cream 
color, but neither the front or doors came 
out right. He said he was willing to pay 
for the work as soon as it was done 
properly. 

White, who is a painter of 20 years' 
experience, swore that he was to paint the 
houses white, but that Young afterwards 



changed the color to light cream. Cream 
then was put or. two coats of white, which 
produced a stone color. 

White obtained judgment for $35 84. All 
that was allowed on the counter-claim was 
51.15. 

PERSONAL MENTION 

Mr. Frank Child, of Aaron Child & Co., 
hardware merchants, Gravenhurst, spent 
part of the holiday season in Toronto. 

Mr. C. F. Grover, who has travelled in 
Western Ontario for H. S. Howland, Sons 
& Co., Toronto, for some years, has ac- 
cepted a position with the Dominion Wire 
Manufacturing Co., Limited, Toronto and 
Montreal, and will represent that firm in 
Ontario, west of Toronto, hereafter. 



ST. JOHN, N.B., HARDWAREMEN. 

At the eighth annual meeting of the St. 
John Iron and Hardware Association, held 
in their rooms, on Monday evening, January 
6, 1902, the following officers for the ensuing 
year were elected : 

President — Mr. S. Hayward. 
Vice-President — Mr. P. McMichael. 
Secretary-Treasurer — Mr. J. J. Barry. 
Directors— Mr. W. H. Thorn^ Mr. T. McAvity, 1 ; 
Mr. R. B. Emerson. 

It was moved that the association hold 
their annual dinner on or about January 
22, 1902. 



BLAZE IN HARDWARE STORE. 

There was a fire in the hardware store of 
Magnan Freres, 306-308 St. Lawrence 
street, Montreal, at 10.30 o'clock on 
Wednesday night. It started in the cellar, 
where one of the corners and ceiling were 
burned, but the fire caused very thick 
smoke, which occasioned some damage to 
the stock in the upper store. The loss will 
probably be nearly $ 1,000, and it is covered 
by insurance. The firemen of the centre 
used a stream before the blaze was under 
control. 

FOR SALE. 

GOOD HARDWARE AND TINWARE Busi- 
ness and premises in small town, splendid 
farming locality. Excellent opportunity for two 
live men. Too much work for owner. Apply, 
Box 76, Hardware and Metal, Toronto. (5) 

FOR SALE. 

STOCK OF HARDWARE IN A HEALTHY, 
growing town in one of the best farming sec- 
tions of Nova Scotia. Every facility for doing a 
good and increasing business. Apply Hardware 
and Metal, Box 74. (4) 

WANTED. 

BY A WINNIPEG WHOLESALE HARD- 
ware firm, two first-class Hardware Clerks. 
Must have a thorough knowledge of hardware in 
all departments. Address applications, stating age, 
experience, references, married or single, etc., 
Drawer 1475, Winnipeg. ( I -tf. ) 

JONES BROS. 

Stove Biick Manufacturers, Fire Clay and Asbestos, 
Furnace Cement, all kinds of Fire Clay Products 
made to order from patterns. 
BRACONDALE P.O., ONT. (near Toronto. 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, January,6, 1902. 

THE only change that has broken the 
monotony of the situation is the 
advance of 5c. on building paper. 
There are rumors that wire nails may 
experience a change in the near future. 
Paints, oils and glass are all very quiet, 
and no change in price to note. Cutter 
and sleigh men are finding the season con- 
siderable of a disappointment owing to lack 
of snow. 

Barbed wire, 100 lb. $3 3° 

Plain twist 3 4° 

Staples 3 95 

Oiled annealed wire 10 3 95 

" 11 4 00 

12 4 05 

" 13 4 20 

14 4 35 

15 4 45 
Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy, keg 3 55 

16 and 20 3 65 

10 365 

8 3 75 

6 3 80 

4 3 95 

3 4 20 

Cutnails, 30 to 60 dy 325 

20 to 40 3 3° 

" 10 to 16 3 35 

8 3 40 

6 3 45 

4 3 55 

3 3 90 

Horsenails, 45 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 65 

No. 2 and larger 4 4° 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 9° 

No. 2 and larger 4 40 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 4 95 

No. 2 and larger 470 

Bar iron, $2.70 basis. 
Swedish iron, $5.00 basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 25 

Spring steel 3 2 5 

Machinery steel 3 75 

Tool steel , Black Diamond , 100 lb 8 50 

Jessop !3 00 

Sheetiron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 3 75 

28 gauge 4 00 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . . 2 79 

18 to 22 gauge 4 75 

24 gauge 5 0O 

26 gauge 5 25 

28 gauge 5 5° 

Genuine Russian, lb 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 75 

26 gauge 8 00 

28 gauge 8 50 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 11 00 

IX " 13 co 

IXX " 15 00 

Ingot tin 33 

Canadaplate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 3 75 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 co 

Broken lots 7 5° 

Pig lead, 100 lb 6 cp 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch 50 an 10 p. c. 

" Over 2 inch 50 p. c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger $13 00 

# 13 5° 

y t and 5-16 13 75 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 16 00. 

X 16 50 

" % and 5-16 1700 

Solder 20 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 17 

Axes, chopping J 7 50 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 87^ 

Round " " 82J4 

Flat ' ' brass 80. 

Round " " 75 

Coach 57^ p.c 

Bolts, carriage 5° P-c. 

Machine 5° P c - 

Tire 60 p.c. 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p.c. 

Rivets, iron 5° P-c 

Copper, No. 8 35 



Spades and shovels ., . . . 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 70 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz. . $2 50 

No. 1 1 50 

No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra 1 75 

No. 1 I 2£. 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5 pc. 

'C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge black 16 50 

chilled, 12 gauge 18 00 

soft, 10 gauge 21 00 

chilled, 10 gauge 23 00 

Shot , Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 25 

Chilled 6 75 

Powder, F.F., keg 4 75 

F.F.G 5 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 75 and 2% p.c. 

" plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

Granite ware, according to quality 50 p.c. 



EMPLOYES DINE. 

On Monday evening, December 30, the 
employes of The Portland Rolling Mills, 
Limited, St. John, N.B., held a reunion and 
dinner at the Park Hotel, when a delightful 
menu and an excellent programme of yocal 
and instrumental music, dancing, etc., were 
provided. It is needless to say that the 
sturdy iron-molders were just as good men 
in their recreation as in their business. 
About 60 were present, among the invited 
guests being D. J. Purdy, M.P.P. 

The chair was occupied by Eben Perkins, 
superintendent of the mills. The enter- 
tainment closed at midnight by the singing 
of "God Save the King." 



PETROLEUM. 



25 'Ac. 

24c. 
22C 

2iHc. 



Water white American 

Prime white American 

Water white Canadian 

Prime white Canadian 

PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 

Turpentine, pure, in barrels 

Less than barrel lots 
Linseed oil, raw 

Boiled 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor 

Eldorado engine 

Atlantic red 

Renown engine 

Black oil 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 

Harness oil 

Neatsfoot oil $ 

Steam refined oil 

Sperm oil 2 00 

Castor oil per lb. 

Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 
united inches 

26 to 40 per 50 ft. 

41 to 50 " 100 ft. 

51 tooo ' 

61 to 70 per 100-ft. boxes 

Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 

kegs 

White lead, pure per cwt. 

No. 1 

Prepared paints, pure liquid colors 
cording to shade and color, per gal 



HOLLOW AUGER. 

E, C. Stearns & Co., Syracuse, 
have recently placed on the market 
auger, the No. 33 hollow auger, 
combines all the desirable features 



N.Y., 
a new 
which 
of the 



well-known Stearns No. 3 hollow auger, with 



NOTES. 

The Manitoba Society of Engineers and 
Architects is applying to the next session of 
the Legislature for a charter. 

Winnipeg's first paint factory is in opera- 
tion. The G. F. Stephens Co., Limited, 
have built one at the rear of their wholesale 
warehouses, and it is now in working order. 

C. C. Macdonald, formerly Dairy Super- 
intendent for Manitoba, has severed his 
connection with The Melotte Cream Separ- 
ator Co., of which company he was a 
member. It is understood that Mr. Mac- 
donald is likely to represent some other 
separator. 




. $i.30to$i.9<4 



THEIR CAPITAL IS NOW $1,000,000 

The enormous increase in the business of 
The Dominion Bridge Co., Montreal, has 
rendered it necessary for them to increase 
their capital. This they finally decided to 
do at a meeting of shareholders on Decem- 
ber 27, when the capital was brought up 
from $500,000 to $1,000,000. 



other improvements, most prominent of 
which is a patent adjustment of the knife, 
doing away entirely with the use of a screw- 
driver and hammer in setting the knife. It 
cuts any size tenon from % to 1% in. It 
is superior in style and workmanship to any 
on the market, with its lustrous black and 
red enamel and its bright parts heavily 
nickle plated and polished. 



E. F. Cowan, storekeeper and lumber 
merchant, Novar, Parry Sound District, has 
made an assignment to Fredrick H. Lambe, 
assignee, of Hamilton. His liabilities are 
estimated at about #8,000, his creditors 
being chiefly in Toronto and Hamilton. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



<* * MACHINERY DEPARTMENT j* * 



^HE EFFICIENCY OF TOOL STEEL. 

UNDER the auspices of The Society 
of German Engineers, the largest 
and richest engineering society in 
the world, some interesting investiga- 
tions have recently been made into the 
difficult problem of ascertaining the suita- 
bility of modern tool steels for high-speed 
cutting tools. The problem has been 
worked out with characteristic German 
thoroughness, and the report on the 800 
tests involved, which has just been pub- 
lished, is a document of great interest 
and of permanent value. 

The remarkable qualities displayed by 
the Taylor-White tool steel during the 
i rials conducted by The Bethlehem Steel 
Co., at the Paris Exhibition of 1900, at, 
once attracted the attention of engineers 
from all parts of the world, and, as an 
immediate consequence, many makers of 
special steels were induced to bestir them- 
selves vigorously in search of new 
methods by which they hoped, if not 
actually to rival the performance of the 
Taylor- White brand, at least to increase 
very largely the cutting speed and the 
general efficiency of their own products. 
As the result of unflagging efforts in this 
direction, several firms have been able to 
place on the market steel-turning tools 
which show a notable improvement in 
cutting efficiency and resistance on the 
tool steels hitherto in ordinary use ; but 
though the superiority of such steels is 
on all sides admitted, it was obviously 
desirable that the economic advantages 
to be derived from their use should be 
established by means of a direct com- 
parison with former methods of working. 
The Berlin Section of the Society of Ger- 
man Engineers came forward with an 
offer of assistance towards the realiza- 
tion of this object. A committee was ap- 
pointed consisting of a number of repre- 
sentatives from leading German engineer- 
Lng works, with Mr. 0. Laschc, works 
manager to the Allgemeine Elektricitats- 
llschaft, as president, for the purpose 
of carrying out all necessary arrange- 
ments for making the experiments. The 
German Niles Tool Steel Works placed at 
the disposal of the committee one of their 
large standard lathes, and Mr. Lasche's 
firm supplied an alternating-current 
motor for independent driving. After 
careful deliberation it was decided to in- 
vite the cooperation of the makers, whose 
steel was to be tested, because they were 
considered the best qualified to select the 
proper shape, and the most suitable 
I irands for particular kinds of work. 
Most of the members of the committee 
were, moreover, unfamiliar with the new 
materia] and its possibilities, and they 
■«ri-lied on the judgment of the makers to 
determine the limit of cutting speed, the 
rate of feed, and the depth of cutting 
which could with safety be permitted. 

When all preliminary details had been 
completed, several steel makers of repute 
were requested to furnish samples of their 
new brands for purposes of testing. These 
firms. The Bergische Stahl-Industric 
Gesellschaft, of Remscheid, Bohler Broth- 
ers & Co., and The Poldi Works, both of 
Vienna and Berlin, responded to the in- 
vitation, and devoted themselves unre- 
mitting! v to the furtherance of the com- 



mittee's plans. Trials were made of the 
endurance of the steels when working on 
all kinds of material of the most varied 
forms, but the chief tests were directed 
to show : 

( 1 ) What extent of surface could be 
machined in a given time, with a given 
depth of cut and any rate of advance- 
ment. 

(2) What weight of cuttings with maxi- 
mum depth of cut could be turned off in 
a given time. 

Most of the steels were procured from 
the makers as finished tools. They had 
been hardened and prepared by a pro- 
cess which it was desired to keep secret, 
and it was therefore possible to grind 
thcan in the works to a certain extent 
only, for as soon as the hardened por- 
tion was worn off it became necessary to 
return them to the manufacturers for re- 
tompcring. In any case, the forging of 
steels of such special compositions as 
these is beyond the resources of most 
works ; and repairs can only be carried 
out properly at the original place of 
manufacture. The following table gives 
the name of the brands, and the number 
of test pieces from each firm of makers : — 



an increased power is necessary for driv- 
ing the machinery is in one sense true, 
but the power needed to turn off 1 lb. of 
cuttings is the same as before ; it is, 
therefore, only the power used per unit 
<>f time that is greater. The question of 
the cost of special steels has not been 
taken into consideration, nor should the 
works-manager attach too much import- 
ance to the price of good tool steel. In 
any circumstances it only represents a 
small fraction of the total capital, and 
it is vastly more important to turn out 
heavy work in the least possible time 
than by mistaken economy to save a lit- 
tle extra money on high-class tool steel. 
The use of powerful machine tools with a 
high speed should be aimed at, and in 
the case of older workshops with slow 
driving the heavy tools might be readily 
adapted for independent driving. — Iron- 
monger. 



ACTION RE PARIS GREEN. 

Judge Sterling B. Toney, of the Circuit 
Court, of Jefferson County, Ky., recently 
rendered an opinion in a curious case. A 
man was employed last July to sprinkle 
paris green on potato vines to kill lady 
bugs, and on account of the heat he 
opened his shirt, with the result that he 
was poisioned by the paris green. He 
sued his employer, who entered a demur- 
rer to the petition, and the learned judge 
sustained the demurrer for the following 
reasons : The plaintiff had no right, in 



Manufacturer No. of Self-hardened No. of 

Pieces Brand Pieces 

Bergische Stahl Industrie 64 L — 

Bohler Brothers 16 Titan-Boreas 78 

Poldi Works 86 Diamond 000 13 



Hardened by Secret 
Process Brand 

Rapid 
Schnelldreher 



The three brands—" L," " Titan- 
Boreas," and " Diamond 000 "—are hard- 
ened by heating them to a certain tem- 
perature and then allowing them to Cool 
slowly in the air. Of the other two 
brands the committee could give no par- 
ticulars as to composition or method of 
preparation, both being kept secret by 
the respective owners. In the case of the 
two first-named firms the steels in no way 
differ from the product which the firms 
have for some time past put on the mar- 
ket. The Poldi Works, however, have not 
yet fully tested the capabilities of the 
new brand " Schnelldreher " (quick- 
turner), and although the tools of this 
steel seemed to be of pre-eminent quality, 
the firm do not guarantee absolute uni- 
formity of quality. A summary of re- 
sults may be seen in the following table : 



foro conscientiae or in foro externo, to 
make an exposure of himself in the way 
he did while engaged in killing lady bugs; 
the defendant exceeded the scope of his 
employment in sprinkling paris green else- 
where than on the potato vines, as his 
special and exclusive agency was to kill 
lady bugs basking in the shade of said 
potato vines ; the plaintiff's act in allow- 
ing defendant's paris green to come in 
contact with his flesh instead of with the 
flesh of the lady bugs, was unauthorized 
and ultra vires ; the mental and physical 
suffering of which the plaintiff complains 
was the result of his own wrong in mis- 
applying the defendant's paris green to 
purposes other than those for which he 
was employed to apply it, and, besides, 
is damnum absque injuria ; the plaintiff, 
in opening his clothes and exposing him- 



Speed of Cutting Total Weight of Total Surface Ma- Duration of Cutting- 
Finn in Inches Cuttings per Sec. chined per Sec. edge till Blunted 
per Second lb. Sq. Inches Minutes 

Bergische Stahl Industrie 0.29 • . 0.321 0.0020 3°9-5° 

Bohler Brothers 0.29 0.423 0.0027 357-83 

Poldi Works 029 °- 2I 3 0.0013 J84 73 



The grooving of chilled rolls, all of 
equal size and composition, formed the 
basis of the tests from which the above 
results were obtained. 

The experiments made by the commit- 
tee cannot be regarded as exhaustive, 
but thev may induce others to compare 
the results with their own practice, and 
thus enable them to judge whether the 
tools and the tool steel made by them 
are as efficient as they might be. since it 
is only by studying the best available 
means that engineers can maintain a high 
degree of efficiency in their works. That 



self to the lady bugs and the paris green, 
was guilty of contributory negligence ; 
the plaintiff knew as well as the defen- 
dant that paris green was poisonous, and 
if he did not know that paris green was 
a poison, then this suit should not have 
been brought in his name, but bv a com- 
mittee appointed to represent him. 



The estimated loss to the general store 
of John McConville & Co., Texada City, 
B.C., by fire, is S400 ; fully covered by 
insurance. 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



.* THE ART OF WINDOW DRESSING. ** 

Hints by an Expert. 





SKATE AND HOCKEY STICK DISPLAY. 

NOW that the skating season is around 
again, one of the principal lines to 
be kept shown in the windows is 
hockey sticks, skates, pucks, straps, and 
everything pertaining to these lines. If 
your window is oblong or square the fol- 
lowing suggestion may be of aid in making 
a display of these lines. Take four lengths 
of small jack chain (brass or nickel) and 
suspend them from the ceiling as shown in 
the rough sketch, and tie hockey sticks from 
one to the other and in this way you can 
make a good stocky overhead trim. Skates 
can be shown on them by shoving the 
handle of the stick through the front part of 
the skate after you have fastened the 
crooked end of stick to the chain. The 
cut will explain the idea. 



white shows them up better, especially at 
night. This suggestion for a display of 
these wares is an excellent one, as it gives 
the trim a massive and stocky appearance 
and it is also very simple and inexpensive. 
If you intend to use the skates on the sticks 
the full height of window it would be ad- 
visable to use an extra heavy chain so as to 
insure safety. A neat card worded after 
the following would complete the trim: 



A COMPLETE LINE 

-: of :- 

SPORTING REQUISITES 

: : at right prices. : : 




No. i — Skate and Hockey Stick Display. 

To suspend the chain from the ceiling 
use a heavy screw-eye and see that it is 
well fastened so as to hold a good weight. 
This idea can be carried right down to the 
floor and the skates could be hung on every 
hockey stick. In place of the skates, 
straps can be shown on the sticks. Skates 
should also be shown on the floor on a 
white canton flannel which shows them up 
well. Black cambric or print makes a 
good ground for skates, but I think the 



A STOVE DISPLAY. 

The illustration No. 2 presents an idea 
that can be carried out on a smaller scale 
by the average hardware house. The back 
of the window is covered over with plain 
ingrain wall paper (red) with a border to 
match. The floor is carpeted with cheap 
straw matting, which can be bought for 
about 15c. per yard (1 yard wide). The 
red wall paper backing makes a warm, 
effective background for stoves, and is 
inexpensive, and can be used as a back- 
ground for lots of different lines of hardware. 
Make a framework of rough strips of lumber 
the same size as the back of your window. 
Have it made in two sections hinged 
together, so that you can get in and out of 
the window. A backing of this kind can be 
made for a few dollars. Over the frame 
stretch cheap grey cotton, and on this paste 




the wall paper. Any wall paperer would 
do this for you at a very nominal cost. 
After the paper gets soiled or torn with 
frequent use it can be repapered in another 
color. The points to be observed in this 
display are : (1) The artistic arrangement 
of the stovepipes ; (2) notice how each stove 
shows up prominently and that one does not 
crowd the other, and (3) the price cards, 
which is the main attraction in a display of 
this kind, or, in fact, of any kind. Any 
person contemplating purchasing a stove, 
seeing a display like the one presented in 
this magazine, could not help being 
impressed with it. Of course, this was an 
extra large window, and perhaps a little 
elaborate for the average hardware store, 
at the same time the ideas are there to be 
observed by the hardware window-trimmer, 
who will find them of great aid in making a 
trim of these goods in a smaller window 
with a less extensive stock. 

KITCHEN UTENSIL DISPLAY. 

Illustration No. 3 is a business-bringing 
trim of kitchen utensils. The rough drawing 
will give the idea of the framework in this 




No. 2 — Display of Stoves, Stovepipes and Fire Irons. 



Framework for Kitchen Utensil Display. 

trim. The framework was covered with 
plain black print. The centre arch was 
made from a 6 inch board 1 inch thick, as 
were also the shelves. 



PRICE CARDS. 

A most particular point that is given very 
little attention by most hardwaremen in 
their window trims is that of price and 
descriptive tickets. To a large extent, the 
window display as a sales-bringer is useless 
unless price - ticketed. If you will just 
experiment on this you will find the ticketed 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



window will do twice the work that the un- 
ticketed trim will do. There are very few 
lines among a hardware stock that look 
attractive in themselves. A price ticket 
will generally make them attractive and 
interesting tp the passing public. The 
large progressive stores all over the country 
do a large part of their business through win- 
dow displays ticketed, and if it was not the 
best means of drawing trade it would have 
been discarded long ago. A little incident 
that happened some months ago, and which 
was narrated in the columns of this paper, 
would perhaps be worth repeating, as it 
will prove a point in favor of price cards in 
window displays, and as there are perhaps 
some of our readers who did not note it 
when it appeared in these columns before. 
I had a very attractive arrangement of 
household necessaries in agate and tinware 
in one of the large windows of the house 1 
was employed in. Each line of goods was 
price-ticketed. People crowded about that 
window all day, attracted, no doubt, by the 



dozens of price cards. Everything really 
appeared a bargain, when actually it was 
nothing special, but all the articles marked 
at about the same value as they could 
have been bought anywhere. However, 
after the trim was completed and the cur- 
tain raised, there was a buying throng in 
the department in a short time, and it kept 
up for several days. One case in particular 
which came to my notice was this : A man 
went up to the department and asked the 
salesperson to give him " one of those 4c. 
tin cups like what was in the window." 
There was a large cooking range on display 
in the department (price $50), and while 
the cup was being parceled up the customer 
was examining the range. He asked the 
price of it from one of the men in charge, 
who told him what it was and explained the 
different parts to him. The customer then 
told the salesman he intended purchasing 
a range in the near future, as he was in the 
restaurant business, and he became so 
interested that before going out he left a 




deposit of $10 on the range, as he said it 
would suit him splendidly, and he was very 
anxious to have it. A few days afterwards 
he came in and paid the balance and had it 
shipped to his address. 

Now, I'll venture to say that had it not 
been for a little 4c. ticket in the window, 
that it is dollars to doughnuts that range 
would possibly have been in the store yet. 
This is only one case among dozens that I 
have seen where price tickets ' ' did the 
business." Therefore, I say, don't neglect 
this item of "trade catching." Any young 
man can in a very short time become quite 
proficient in card-making. It may be a 
little difficult at first, and one will generally 
become disheartened over his few first 
attempts, but you will be surprised how 
soon you will be able to execute a good 
business ticket with constant practice. 
Take stock how letters and figures on 
posters, almanacs, 'etc., are made, and copy 
them, and in a short time you will become 
familiar with the formation of them. 

Don't attempt fancy letters, adopt the 
plain block letter, as it is the easiest read, 
and that is what the public of to day require, 
something that can be read at a glance. 
Use the black lettering only. Drop black 
thinned with turpentine makes the best for 
general use. Get several brushes, sizes from 
5 to 10, in sable. Keep these clean by 
rinsing them in turps, frequently. Put in 
your spare time practising. Sketch out the 
lettering in lead pencil. Outline the figures 
with the small size brush and fill in with the 
larger ones. After a time you will be able 
to do the lettering without penciling them 
first. Train the brushes flat by always using 
the same side. H. H. 



THOS. DAVIDSON MANUFACTURING 
CO. 

Under the cut which appeared in connec- 
tion with the report of the annual dinner of 
the Thomas Davidson Manufacturing Co., 
Montreal, in last week's issue, appeared the 
line, "The Staff of the Thomas Davidson 
Manufacturing Co." It should have read, 
"Members of the firm and travelling staff 
of the Thomas Davidson Manufacturing 
Co." 



No. 3 — Kitchen Utensil Display. 



MR. JOHNSTON TO GO SOUTH. 

The many friends of Mr. James Johnston, 
who for many years has been representing 
the Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co., 
Limited, Toronto and Montreal, will regret 
to hear that he has been granted leave of 
absence on account of ill health and is 
leaving for the South to spend the winter. 

Hardware & Metal hopes that his 
recovery will be speedy. 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANUFACTURE OF SPORTING GUNS AND RIFLES. 



From The British Trade Journal. 



DOUBTLESS it is one result of the 
sporting proclivities of the Eng- 
lishman that the manufacture in 
this country of guns and rifles for all 
classes of game has attained its undis- 
puted position. Cheap and common guns 
may be exported from the Continent, but 
whenever the nobility of Europe or the 
millionaires of the United States require 
a thoroughly serviceable and reliable 
weapon it is to the English market that 
they come. 

THE ENGLISH GUN INDUSTRY 

has attained this position by dint of 
constant attention given to it by capable 
men for centuries, and during the last 
20 or 30 years the improvements which 
have been made in guns and rifles testnj 
that it is still as lull of life and vigor 
as ever. 1'erhaps no other gunmakers in 
the world have so wide a range of experi- 
ence in designing weapons lor various 
classes of sportsmen and of sport, not 
only in this country, but in India, 
Africa, Australia, and North America, 
from shot guns for partridges and rook 
rifles to ritles to bring down lions and 
bull elephants. In the home market it 
would be difficult to find, with the ex- 
ception .here and there of a rook rifle, 
any gun not made by English workman- 
ship and from English material. For 
export requirements, where serviceable 
weapons are required, the same remark 
holds good. Eor the 

BEST CLASS OF EXPORT TRADE 

naturally an extensive assortment is ne- 
cessary, for it must include the highest- 
class specimens of hammer less choke- bore 
guns and accurately bored rifles, with the 
finest types of steel barrels, as well as 
the cheaper but very serviceable and 
good-value guns. The minimum of 
weight for the export trade is of less im- 
portance, although the weight of birding 
guns has constantly downward tenden- 
cies. Eor colonial use, guns of good 
strength are needed, and strength of the 
parts naturally means increased weight. 
India, America, and Australia require 
heavier guns than the continent because 
of the heavier game met with. These 
requirements are fully met by really 
sound, good-shooting, but plainly-lin- 
ished weapons, of which we could in- 
stance several varieties sent to all parts 
of the world by our leading makers. 

Anyone who wishes to obtain an in- 
sight into the best practice of gun manu- 
facture now pursued cannot do better 
than visit the works of one of the lead- 
ing English firms in this trade. The 
various parts of the action and lock are 
received in the form of rough forgings. 
They are then subjected to the action of 
machine tools, such as milling and pro- 
filing, boring and slotting machines, I 
means of which each forging is reduced 
and shaped to the exact form and size 
required, being finished with the greatest 
possible accuracy and machined to the: 
thousandth part of an inch. One part of 
the action alone undergoes no fewer than 
179 operations before it is sufficiently fin- 
ished to render it fit for putting together 
with the lock. In this department are 
also machines producing the screws and 
bolts by which the various parts of the 



action are held together. To carry out 
these processes 

AN INFINITE VARIETY 

of cutting tools is required, both as re- 
gards shape and size, and special 
arrangements are to hand for making 
such cutters and keeping them in the 
highest working condition. The barrels 
are bored, turned, and finished in anothei 
department, where also the ribs and locks 
are brazed to the barrels. In this part 
some of the most costly machinery can be 
seen, by means of which the grooves are 
cut in the barrels of rifles and the choke 
given to shot guns. The barrels must 
also be polished and then browned, and, 
of course, tested at the London proof 
house by means of charges of powder, 
shot or bullet far in excess of anything 
required in actual use. The construction 
of the modern gun-action requires even 
greater nicety and accuracy of workman- 
ship than in a timepiece. Efforts are 
constantly made to 

SIMPLIFY THIS MECHANISM, 

and not without success, as will be seen 
by the new improved ejectors, in which 
only two parts are necessary, whereas 
formerly eight or ten were required. 
Working in the same direction is the 
wonderfully ingenious lock mechanism by 
which one trigger is made to serve two 
barrels. Then the arrangement of ham- 
merless guns and the lever and bolt or 
grip action for opening breech-loaders 
and firmly closing them again with per- 
fect rigidity necessitate an excellence of 
material and a perfect accuracy of work- 
manship which it would be difficult to 
parallel, and which, seeing that human 
life may often depend upon its sound- 
ness, is of the utmost importance. A walk 
through the action department, where 
rows of skilled artisans are at work, 
shaping and finishing and putting to- 
gether the various parts, will convince 
any user of a gun that nothing is left 
undone to insure absolute reliability. 

The barrels, ribs, actions and levers, 
and generally with ejecting mechanism, 
having been put together, the " stock- 
ing-room " is reached. Here the steel 
and iron portions of the weapon are fit- 
ted into the stock, and during recent 
years, as the advantages of using 
" fitted " guns have become more and 
more apparent, this operation has be- 
come of more importance, necessitating 
very careful measurement and adjustment 
by means of a " Try " gun. With the 
aid of this a sportsman can ascertain 
the exact shape, bend, length, and cast- 
off of the stock best suited to his build. 
and thus insure a perfectly-fitting gun, 
with which much better practice will be 
made than with the ordinary stock 
pattern. 

Many of the parts are worked and fin- 
ished in a comparatively soft state which 
necessitates the use of 

HEARTHS FOR CASE-HARDENING. 

This applies also to the action and trig- 
ger plates, which in high-class guns are 
generally covered with beautifully artis- 
tic designs, in which the true sportsman 
takes infinite pride. This work of en- 
graving or chasing requires a consider- 
able degree of skill and judgment. In 
guns and rifles for princes and wealthy 



sportsmen of every degree the designs are 
worked out with inlaid gold, and many 
sporting scenes are in this way depicted 
with striking success. 

THE SHAPING AND CARVING OF STOCKS 

necessitates another set of skilled opera- 
tives, and in elaborate designs aSfcon- 
siderable amount of work can be be- 
stowed upon this part of a modern 
weapon. The material mostly favored is 
English walnut, boldly figured and with 
contrasts of color. As this is becoming 
scarce, walnut from other countries must 
be used, equally strong and light, even 
when its appearance is less effective. To 
add to the steadiness and certainty with 
which a gun can be held, stocks are now 
shaped with what is well known as the 
pistol hand and with a cheek piece. The 
surface of the pistol grip is generally 
checkered to increase the firmness of grip. 
In another department such processes as 
sighting, fitting telescopes for long-range 
rifles, etc., are carried out. 

A 1 6 BORE HAMMER 

or hammerless, weighing only about (5 4 
lb., has been largely supplied to custom- 
ers for use in Germany, .Russia, Spain 
and other countries, where snap-shooting 
at heavy game is usual. Favorable re- 
ports as to its efficiency have also been 
received from British Columbia, Tas- 
mania, and for use against wild boar, 
red deer, elk, and bear. It discharges 
shot with a penetration of a 12-bore and 
conical bullets up to 100 yards with the 
accuracy of an express rifle. When it was 
first introduced public trials were held, 
at which the operator shot 10 consecu- 
tive shots right and left at 50 yards' 
range with three drachms of powder and 
conical bullets, the whole of which were 
placed within a space measuring 2£ in. 
by 24 in. Ten consecutive shots were 
then fired at 100 yards and put into a 
space of 3£ in. by 5f in. The wind hav- 
ing dropped, another trial of 10 shots 
was made, when the 10 bullets were put 
into a space measuring 3£ in. by 4 3-16 
in., nine of them being in a space 2£ in. 
by 3^ in. For countries where large and 
small game are met with, the importance 
of such a weapon is obvious. 



A TRAVELLER'S DEFENCE. 

A somewhat sad instance of modern 
competition, remarks Grocery, especially 
amongst the travellers of different houses 
in their endeavor to secure orders for the 
firms they represent, is afforded by a 
case which came before the Gloucester 
assizes. A commercial traveller was 
charged with embezzling money belonging 
to his employers, and his defence was 
that he had not devoted the money to 
his own purposes, but had employed it 
in entertaining customers with a view to 
increased sales. Unfortunately for him, 
he had previously been in trouble for a 
similar offence and he was sentenced to* 
three years' penal servitude, but there is 
very little doubt in our minds that, 
feeling himself incapable of securing trade 
in any other way, he had endeavored to 
obtain it by the means he stated. All 
this is very sad, but on the whole we 
doubt whether, in spite of the keen com- 
petition which exists, the treating evil is 
so bad by a long way as it used to be 
even 20 years ago. Then it was quite 
unusual for a bargain to be completed 
without the assistance of alcohol in some 
shape or form. Now it is the exception 
rather than the rule. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



John Bowman 

HARDWARE & COAL CO. 

LONDON, ONT. 



SKATES SKATES SKATES 

We have a large stock of Skates to dispose of 
and will fill all orders promptly at closest prices. 

Cutlery Cutlery Cutlery 



Special Lines 



Special Prices 



English and German Table and Pocket 
Cutlery, Cases, Carvers, Razors, Scis- 
sors, Pen and Pocket and Table Cutlery 
in great variety. 



Special Pri 



We wish to extend 
to our patrons our 
sincere thanks for 
favors received 
during iooi, and to 
wish them one and 
all a Happy and 
Prosperous 1002. 



•1+ «.[* 



DOMINION WIRE MFG. GO. 



Montreal 



Limited Toronto 



ESTABLISHED I860, 



NCORPORATED 



89 5. 



STJGrJLtt MAKEES' STTZPZPLIIE S 



-^m 




"IMPERIAL 



1 9 Steel 
Sap 
Spouts 



Improved 1902 Pattern, Tapered. 
Specially adapted for Covered Sap Buckets. 



"EUREKA" 



Steel Sap Spouts 



Patented 1896 



THE "EUREKA" STEEL SAP SPOUTS 

ARE EVER POPULAR 



BECAUSE THEY ARE: 



Economical and Durable. 

Safe and Secure — No Leakage. 

Easily Inserted — Do not injure the tree. 

Secure Full Flow of Sap. 
All packed in cardboard boxes, IOO each. 
We carry full stock of all lines. Write for prices. 
Orders by letter or wire promptly shipped. 



fWLE 5TRUP OIN5 
"LOWER CANADA" 



ROUND-With Screw Tops 
and Strap Handles. 

SQUARE -With ScrewTops 
and Wire Handles. 

Plain or Lithographed. 

capacity: 

1 Qt Wine Measure. 
1 Qr. Imperial Measure. 
% Gall. Wine Measure. 
% Gall. Impl. Measure. 
1 Gall. Wine Measure. 
1 Gal). Impl. Measure. 

Special design made up, if suf- 
ficient quantities are wanted. 




Sap 
Buckets 



Long Pattern 



Nos. 
Quarts 



4 6 



Western Pattern 

6 and 10 Quarts. 



THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL, 




22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




CJ QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, January 10, 1902. 
HARDWARE. 

THOUGH just recovering from the 
holiday season, business on the 
whole, is satisfactory, and, com- 
pared with the same period a year ago, 
it is in a better condition. Orders for 
present delivery are merely given to fill 
immediate needs. Merchants throughout 
the country are stock-taking, and do not 
care to buy for spring just yet. On the 
other hand those houses whose travellers 
have been on the road, report that or- 
ders for spring delivery are encouraging, 
and that the outlook for spring business 
is bright. All the American travellers 
have been here this week and they are 
quoting a few changes on builders' hard- 
ware, most of which are slightly lower. 
This, of course, will affect the trade here 
in the near future. 

BARB WIRE — There is practically no 
change, a quiet market continuing. We 
quote §3 per 100 lb. f.o.b. Montreal. 

GALVANIZED WIRE ~ There is not 
much doing. Prices are steady, as fol- 
lows: Nos. 6, 7 and 8 gauge, $3.45; No. 9, 
82.80; No. 10. $3.55; No. 11, $3.65; No. 
12, $2.95 ; No. 13, $3.05 ; No. 14, $4.05 : 
No. 15, $4.55 ; No. 16, $4.80 ; No. 17, 
$5.20 ; No. 18, $5.45. 



SMOOTH STEEL WIRE — The demand 
has taken a turn for the better. Oiled 
and annealed wire sell as follows No. 9, 
$2.80; No. 10, $2.87; No. 11, $2.90; 
No. 12, $2.95 ; No. 13, $3.15 per 100 lb. 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, Lon- 
don. vSt. John and Halifax. 

FINE STEEL WIRE — A moderate 
business is doing ; discount 17£ per cent. 

BRASS AND COPPER WIRE — There 
is not much movement in either. On both 
copper and brass wire the discount is 55 
and 2^ per cent. 

FENCE STAPLES — A dull _ market 
continues. We quote $3.25 for bright and 
S3. 75 for galvanized per 100-lb. keg. 

WIRE NAILS — A fair movement is 
noted. We quote as follows : $2.85 for 
small lots and $2.77-^ for carlots f.o.b. 
Montreal. London, Toronto, Hamilton 
and Gananoque. 

CUT NAILS — There is a moderate 
trade doing. Our quotations are : $2.55 
per keg for small and $2.45 for car- 
lots ; flour barrel nails, 25 per cent, dis- 
count ; coopers' nails, 30 per cent, dis- 
count. 

HORSE NAILS — All the mills are now 
using the new list on horse nails. The 
demand continues rather light. " C " 
brand is sold at a discount of 50 and 7-^ 
per cent, off the new list. " M " brand 
is quoted at 60 per cent, also off the new 



list, on oval and city head, and 66 2-3 
per cent, off countersunk head. 

HORSESHOES — There is not a very 
active market. We quote ?« follows: Iron 
shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 2 and 
larger, $3.50 ; No. 1 and smaller, $3.75 : 
snow shoes, No. 2 and larger, $3.75 ; No. 
1 and smaller, $4 ; X L steel shoes, all 
sizes, 1 to 5, No. 2 and larger, $3.60 ; 
No. 1 and smaller, $3.85 ; feather-weight, 
all sizes, $4.85 ; toe weight, steel shoes, 
till sizes, $5.95 f.o.b. Montreal ; f.o.b. 
Hamilton, London and Guelph, 10c. 
extra. 

SCREWS — The movement is fair, being 
mostly in small quantities for immediate 
requirements. The discounts are as 
follows : Flat head bright, 87£ 
and 10 per cent, off list ; round head 
bright, 82£ and 10 per cent.; flat head 
brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round head 
brass, 75 and 10 per cent. 

BOLTS — There is a pretty good de- 
mand. We quote as follows : Norway 
carriage bolts, 60 and 5 per cent. ; 
common, 55 and 5 per cent.; full square 
carriage bolts, 60 and 5 per cent.; 
machine bolts, 55 and 5 per cent. ; coach 
screws, 70 per cent. ; sleigh shoe bolts. 
70 per cent. ; blank bolts, 60 per cent. ; 
bolt ends, 60 per cent. ; plough bolts. 55 
and 5 per cent. ; tire bolts, 67$ per cent.; 
stove bolts, 67^ per cent. To any retail- 
er an extra discount of 5 per cent, is 



"Samson" Railroad or Delivery Cans m Trimmings 

Supplied with "Samson" Seamless Bottom, Seamless Cover, Seamless <>^cS^ 
k, Seamless Breast, and "D" Side Handles. «<\3^ \Qff* 



Cleanest, Easiest to Handle and most Durable Railroad or Delft ry Cat* 
on the Canadian market. 

Bodies made of extra heavy tinned iron. 





"SAMSON" 
OWIth Seamless Cover. 




Seamless Cover has no seams in the rim to collect dirt or to work loose. 

Being drawn from one piece of steel makes it of uniform size. "SAMSON" -With Bell Cover. 

It is perfectly air-tight. «^£$jT 

Seamless Neck is drawn from one piece of specially prepared stee^jfchyO^ 



annealed to prevent any possibility of their cracking. 



? 




■-■ 



\* 



This Cover and Neck together with the "Samson" Bottom makes this 
Railroad or Delivery Can unquestionably the best ever put on the market. 

The "Samson" is the strongest and only one-piece bottom on the 
market. 

TINNED IRON, ALL SIZES AND GAUGES. 

Prompt shipment always made. 




"SAMSON" 
Seamless Cover and Neok. 



£ McClary Manufsoturing Co., 

TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, AND ST. JOHN, N.B. 

" Everything for the Tinshop." 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



23 



THE PACE-HERSEY 
IRON & TUBE GO. 



-Limited 



Montreal 



Manufacturers of 



J 



Wrought Iron Pipe 

For Water, Gas, Steam, Oil, 
Ammonia and Machinery. 



DRAIN PIPES, 
PORTLAND CEMENTS, 
FIRE BRICKS AND CLAY 
SILICA AND MAGNESIA 
BRICKS, 

with specially prepared mortar. 

Contractors' and Founders' 
Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SHfffiRFIre 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

^ CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 



LIMITED 



DESERONTO, ONT, 



Manufacturers o f 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
B required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundrj 
Purposes. 



allowed. Nuts, square, 3|c. per lb. off 
list ; hexagon nuts, 4c. per lb. off list. 
To all retailers an extra discount of £c. 
per lb. is allowed. 

BUILDING PAPER — The trade in 
building paper is picking up some, orders 
for spring having begun to arrive. As 
yet, however, the movement is not 
large. We quote as follows : Tar- 
red felt, $1.70 per 100 lb.; 2-ply, 
ready roofing, 85c. per roll ; 3-ply, $1.10 
per roll ; carpet felt, $2.25 per 100 lb.; 
dry sheathing, 35c. per roll ; tar sheath- 
ing, 45c. per roll ; dry fibre, 55c. per roll; 
tarred fibre, 65c. per roll ; O.K. and I.X. 
L., 70c. per roll ; heavy straw sheathing, 
$30 per ton ; slaters' felt, 60c. per roll. 

CORDAGE — Trade is better than last 
week. Prices are still firm. We quote 
as follows : Manila, 15$c; British 
Manila at 13^c; sisal, 12c. and lathyarn 
at 10^c. Manitoba prices are : Manila, 
16c; British Manila, 14^c; sisal, 13c. and 
lathyarn, 12c. 

RIVETS AND BURRS - There is noth- 
ing new to note. A moderate trade con- 
tinues. The discounts are as follows : 
Best iron rivets, section, carriage, and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., coop- 
ers' rivets and tinlned swedes rivets,, 60 and 
10 per cent. ; swedes iron burrs are 
quoted at 55 per cent, off ; copper rivets, 
35 and 5 per cent, off, and coppered iron 
rivets and burrs, in 5-tb. carton boxes, 
are quoted at 60 and 10 per cent, off 
list. 

SCREEN CLOTH - There is little 
doing. The prices remain at $1.25 per 
100 square feet. 

POULTRY NETTING — The demand 
for spring delivery is keeping up well. 
Canadian or English is quoted at a dis- 
count of 60 per cent, off 2 x 2 mesh, 19 
wire, and 55 per cent, off 2x2 mesh 
heavier, Canadian list. 

HARVEST TOOLS — There is no 
change. The discount is 70 per cent. 

FIREBRICKS — The demand is fairly 
good. We quote as follows : Scotch at 
$19 to $23.50 and English at $18.50 to 
$22.50 per 1,000. 

CEMENT — There is little doing. 
We quote : German cement, $2.30 to 
$2.40 ; English, $2.25 to $2.35 ; Belgian, 
$1.70 to $1.95 per bbl. ex-wharf, and 
American, $2.20 to $2.30 ex-cars. 

METALS. 

Business in most lines is rather flat 
this week. There have been no changes 
in prices since our last report. 

PIG IRON — There is a small move- 
ment at steady prices. We quote : Sum- 
merlee at $21 to $21.50 and Canadian at 
$18.50 to $19. 

BAR IRON — Business is not active. 
Merchants' bar sells for $1.87£ in car- 
lots and $1.95 in smaller quantities. 
Horseshoe is worth $2.15 to $2.20. 

BLACK SHEETS — A fair trade is 
doing, but it is mostly in small orders. 
Our quotations are as follows: 28 gauge. 
$2.65 ; 26 gauge, $2.60 ; 20 to 24 gauge, 
$2.50, and 8 to 20 gauge, $2.50. 

GALVANIZED IRON — There is not 
much change. Business is dull. We quote: 
No. 28, Queen's Head, $4.40 ; Apollo, 10* 
oz., $4.40 ; Comet, $4.25 with 10c. extra 
in less than case lots. 

INGOT COPPER — Since the drop in 
price last week there has been no change. 
The price remains at 14^c. 

INGOT TIN — There is only a small 
demand. The price for Straits is 27c. 



ANVILS i VISES 



MADE BY 



Henry Wright & Co. 

SECOND TO NONE. 

PRICE MODERATE. 

STOCK IN MONTREAL. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO 



AGENTS 



MONTREAL. 




IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pomps 



Foroe, Lift and Ciitern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
—quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



rHE 8. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 

Manufacturer*, Gait. Canada. 



ADAffl HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 



We offer for prompt shipment 
F>ig Tin, 

L. & F. and STRAITS. 

igot Copper, O.O. 
F^ig Lead. 
Spelter. 
Antimony. 



Nova Scotia Steel Go. 

Limited 

NEW 8LA880W, N.S. 

Manufacturers of 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMBNS KARTIlf 

Open Hearth Steel 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOR THE 
STREET 



.J® 




What 

"M&M 




M TRBQE ,, 

THE M&M LIGHT 



Lamps 
Do. 



Thev give a stronger, whiter, steadier light than the electric 
arc. Operate easily, pafely, satisfactorily. Save money— actual 600 
candle-power light at a cost of one-half cent an hour. Think of 
it ! Write for circulars, etc. GOOD AGENTS WANTED- Exclu- 
sive territory allowed. 

ACOBN BKASS WOBKS, 
Dert. 11. 15-?3 Jefferson Street - CHICAGO, ILL. 



What 




FOR THE 
STORE 



Lamps 
Save. 



Barrett Hardware Co , Joliet. 111., write : "Gasoline and sup- 
plies for "M & M'' Lamps cost ns $15.46 last year, an average of 
60c. a month per lamp. We believe we had as good a light as 
though we had six electric arc lights at a cost of $360." No wonder 
that over 30,000 'M&M" lamps are in use all over the United 
States and Canada. THEY KILL BIG GAS AND ELECTRIC 
LIGHT BILLS. It will pay you to investigate. Write for circu- 
lars. AGENTS WANTED. Dept. 11, 15-23 Jefferson St., Chicago. 



RICHARD JOHNSON, CLAPHAM & MORRIS UMITED - MANCHESTER 



Cable Address— "Metallicus," Manchester. 
C des Used— ABC, AI, Liebers 
and Private Code. 

Manufacturers and 

GALV'D SHEETS 
GALV'D CANADAS 
BLACK SHEET IRON 
BLACK CANADAS 
Range & Furnace SHEETS 

MONTREAL OFFICE: 

Messrs. Copland & Co., 
Imperial Buildings. 




WAREHOUSE LEVER STREET 



and LIVERPOOL, ENG. 

Metal Merchants 

TINPLATES, TERNES 
TINNED SHEETS 
PIG TIN, PIG LEAD 
WIRE NETTING 
GALV'D BARB WIRE 



HALIFAX OFFICE: 

Messrs. Grant, Oxley & Co 
68 Bedford Row. 



PIG LEAD — A fair and steady de- 
mand is reported this week. We quote : 
33.15 to $3.20. 

LEAD PIPE — Business is, as visual, at 
unchanged prices. We quote : Ordinary 
7c., composition waste, at 7£c, with 30 
per cent. off. 

IKON PIPE — A good movement con- 
tinues and prices are firm. We quote: Black 
pipe, i, 83.00 per 100 feet ; f, $2.95 ; 
i, $3.10 ; f, $3.45 ; 1-inch, $5 ; 1£, $7.10 ; 
H, $8.50; 2-inch, $11.35. Galvanized, 4 
$4.40 ; f, $5 ; 1-inch, $7.15 ; H, $10 ; R 
$12 : 2-inch. $15.95. 

TINPLATES -- There is not much 
doing. Cokes sell at $3.75 to $4, and 
charcoal at $4.25 to $4.50. 

CANADA PLATE — Prices remain 
steady, and there is little doing. We 
quote : 52's. 82.(55 to $2.70 ; 60's, $2.75 
to $2.80 ; 75's, $2.80 to $2.85 ; full 
polished, $3.75 and galvanized, $4.25 to 
$4.35. 

STEEL — The firm prices continue, and 
the demand is fair. Our quotations are : 
Sleigh shoe. 82.05; tire, $2.15; bar, $2; 
spring, $2.85 : machinery. $2.85', and toe- 
calk, "$2.60. 

SHEET STEEL — There is no change. 
Quotations are as follows : Nos. Hi 
to 20, $2.50 ; 3-10, $2.50 ; i, 5-10 and |, 
$2.40. 

TOOL STEEL — Black Diamond, 8c. 
and Jcssop's, 13c. 

TERNE PLATES — There is a fair in- 
quiry for terne plates. We quote $7.75 to 
$8 00 

" (Oil. CHAIN — There is a little better 
movement, but still the demand is 



small. We quote as follows : No. 

0, 12£c; No. 5, 10*c; No. 4, 10c; 
No. 3, l)£c.; i-in., 7£c. per lb.; 5-10. 
$4.80 ; 5-10 exact, $5.25 ; g, $4.25 ; 7-10, 
14.05 ; i, $3.S5 ; 9-16, $3.75 ; f , $3.55 ; 

1, $3.50 ; |, $3.45 ; 1-in., $3.45. In car- 
load lots an allowance of 10c. is made. 

SHEET ZINC — There is a small 
movement at 85.75 to $6.25. 

ANTIMONY — The market is unchanged 
and the price is still 10c. 

ZINC SPELTER — The trade is 'quiet 
at 5e. 

SOLDER — We quote : Bar solder, 18c; 
wire solder, 20c. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

After a somewhat qiuiet fortnight, 
owing to the holidays, business in Mont- 
real has started in briskly. All the fac- 
tories seem to be preparing for a heavy 
spring business. Early ordering would be 
a wise policy, as business at present 
points to a general rush in February and 
March, in which the usual slow deliveries 
would occur. Changes this week are 
in>ted in ground white lead and turpen- 
tine. In the former, the reduction has 
been 12£c, which, it is thought, will lead 
to a good demand, as grinders are keep- 
in" these prices firm till May 15. There 
is a strong demand for turpentine in the 
South, and the visible supply not being 
excessive, prices have been advanced 2c. 
In the opinion of a few dealers, a rising 
market may be experienced for some time. 
The situation in linseed oil, which has 
been so erratic of late, is somewhat 
steadier, and no changes in prices have 
been made since our last quotations. 



Paris green is being inquired after freely. 
The country seems to be pretty short in 
stock and Canadian manufacturers have 
now a large quantity ready for shipment. 
We quote : 

WHITE LEAD— Best brands, Govern- 
ment standard, $5.87^ ; No. 1, $5.50 ; No. 
2 |5.12£; No. 3, $4.75; No. 4, $1.37.;, 
all f.o.b. Montreal. Terms, 3 per cent, 
cash or four months. 

DRY WHITE LEAD-$5.25 in casks ; 
kegs, $5.50. 

DRY WHITE ZINC - Pure dry, 64;c. ; 
No. 1, 5£c ; in oil, pure, 7£c. ; No. 1, 
6£c ; No. 2, 5£c. 

PUTTY — We quote : Bulk, in bbls., 
$1.90 per 100 lb. ; bulk, in less quantity, 
$2.05 ; bladders, in bbls., $2.25 ; blad- 
ders, in 100 or 200 lb. kegs or boxes, 
$2.40 ; in tins, $2.55 to $2.65 ; in less 
than 100-lb. lots, $3 f.o.b. Montreal, 
Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph. Maritime Provinces, 10c. high 
er, f.o.b. St. John and Halifax. 

ORANGE MINERAL— Casks, 7c ; 100 
lb. kegs, 7£c ; smaller quantities, 8£c. 

RED LEAD — Genuine red lead in 
casks, $4.50 ; in 100-lb. kegs, $4.75 ; less 
quantities, $5.75 per 100 lb. No. 1 red 
lead, casks, $4.25 ; kegs, $4.50, and 
smaller quantities, $5.50. 

LITHARGE— Ground, casks, 5c ; less, 
5-^c ; flake litharge, casks, $5.25 ; smalls, 
$5.75 per 100 lb. 

LINSEED OIL— Raw, 75c; boiled, 78c 
in 5 to 9 bbls., 1c less. 10 to 20 bbl. 
lots open, net cash, plus 2c for four 
months. Delivered anywhere in Ontario 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 



barrels, 
50 and 



between Montreal and Oshawa at 2c. per 
gal. advance and freight allowed. 

TURPENTINE - Single bbls., 60c; 2 lo 
4 bbls., 59c.; 5 bbls, and over, open 
terms. 

SHELLAC VARNISH - Pure white 
12.35 to $2.45 ; orange, $2.25 to $2 35 

MIX^D PA1NTS-$1.20 to $1.45 per 
gal. 

CASTOR OIL— 8| to 9jc in wholesale 
lots, and £o. additional for small lots. 

SEAL OlL-47^ to 4»e. 

COD OIL-32i to 35c. 

PARIS GREEN - Petroleum 
16fc. per tb.; arsenic kegs, 17c. 
100-tb. drums, ' 17£c; 25 lb. drums, 18c: 
1-lb. packages, 18£c; £-lb. packages, 
20£c; 1-tb. tins, I9£c; £-Ib. tins, 21*0. 
f.o.b. Montreal. Terms : 3 per cent. 30 
days, or four months from date of 
delivery. 

GLASS. 

The movement is a small one, and there 
is no change in prices, which are firm. 
We quote as follows : First break, 50 
feet, $2.10; second, $2.20 for 50 feet; 
first break, 100 feet, $4 ; second break. 
$4.20; third break, $4.70, and fourth 
I. icak, $4.05. 

SCRAP METALS. 

There is a fairly good movement on 
most lines. Prices remain stetady. 
We quote as follows Heavy cop 
per and wire, 13^ to 14c. per 
It). ; light copper, 12 to 12^c; heavy 
brass, 12 to J2^c; heavy yellow, 9^c; 
light brass, 6^c; lead, 2f to 2|c per lb.; 
zinc, 2 to 2£c; iron, No. 1, wrought, $10 
light brass, 6-Jc; lead, 2^ to 2jc per lb.; 
zinc, 2 to 2£c; iron, No. 1, wrought, $10 
to $15 per gross ton f.o.b. Montreal ; 
stove plate, $8 to $9 ; machinery scrap, 
$14 ; light iron, No. 2, $5 a ton ; malle- 
able and steel, $4 ; rags, country. 60 to 
70c per 100 tb.; old rubbers, 7 to 7Jc. 
per lb. 

HIDES. 

Business is somewhat quiet, and prices 
are unchanged. We quote as follows : 
No. I hides, 7^0.; No. 2, 6£c; No. 3, 

5^c. Sheepskins, (>0c. 

MARKET NOTES. 

Turpentine is 2c higher and prices are 
becoming' firmer. 

Then' has been a reduction of I2 ] c in 
ground white lead. 

The new list adopted by The Montreal 
Rolling Mills, Co. and by Peck, Benny >V 
Co., is the same that has been in use by 
The Canada Horse Vail Co. during the 
past year. 



T 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, January io, 1902. 

HARDWARE. 

•HE travellers have again resumed 
their respective routes, and business 
^ — is beginning to recover from its holi- 
day quietude. In volume, business is not 
yet large, but it is fair. The outlook for the 
spring trade is good. Quite a few orders 
for future shipment in such goods as harvest 
tools, spades and shovels, green wire cloth, 
spring binges, ice cream freezers and poul- 
tsy netting are coming to hand. A num- 
ber of orders for general hardware have 
come to hand from the Northwest during 
the past week. Some orders for fence wire 



are being booked. Bolts and rivets con- 
tinue in good demand. Business is fair in 
screws. Very little is being done in nails. 
Horseshoes and horse nails are in moderate 
request. In sporting goods and cutlery, 
there is very little doing. White lead is 
25c. per 100 lb. lower, and pure manila 
rope advanced another j£c. per lb. on the 
9th inst. The various manufacturers' 
associations are holding their regular meet- 
ings in Toronto this week, but up to the 
time of writing, no changes have been 
made in prices. 

Barb Wire — A fair number of orders are 
being placed on import account. Advices 
from the United States report the demand 
there good, with prices rather easy, 
however. We quote, f.o.b. Cleveland, 
$2 .77 'A for less than carlots, and $2.65 for 
carlots. From stock Toronto, $3. 

Galvanized Wire — Some business 
on future account is being done this 
week. We quote as follows : Nos. 
6, 7 and 8, $3.50 to $3.85 per 100 lb., 
according to quantity ; No. 9, 52.85 to 
53.15 ; No. 10, 53.60 to 53.95 ; No. n, 
53-7o to 54.10 ; No. 12, 53 to 53.30 ; 
No. 13, 53. 10 to 53.40 ; No. 14, 54.10 to 
54.50; No. 15, 54.60 to 55 50; No. 16, 
54.85 to 55.35. Nos. 6 to 9 base f.o.b. 
Cleveland are quoted at 52.52^ in less 
than carlots and 12c. less for carlots of 15 
tons. 

Smooth Steel Wire — A few orders for 
spring delivery are reported for oiled and 
annealed. We quote net : Nos. 6 to 8, 52.90; 
9,52.80:10,52.87; 11,52.90; 12,52.95; 

13. «3-is ; 14,53-37; 15. #3-5°; l6 - 

53.65. Delivery points, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London and Montreal, with freights 
equalized on those points. 

Wire Nails — As we go to press the 
wire nailmakers are considering the ques- 
tion of prices, but so far have come to no 
decision. The base price is nominally 52.85 
for less than carlots, and $2.77 }4 for carlots. 
Delivery points, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London, Gananoque and Montreal. 

Cut Nails — No change, trade still being 
dull. The base price is 52 55 per keg, 
with ioc. allowance on carlots. 

Horse Nails— Business is just moderate. 
Discounts are as follows : "C " brand, 
oval head, 50 and 7)4 per cent., and 
on "M" and other brands, 50, 10 and 
5 per cent. Countersunk head 60 per cent. 
All the manufacturers are now understood 
to be selling off the same list. 

Horseshoes — The demand is moderate, 
with prices unchanged. We quote f.o.b. 
Toronto as follows : Iron shoes, No. 2 
and larger, light, medium and heavy, 
53.60 ; snow shoes, $3.85 ; light steel 
shoes, 53.70; featherweight (all sizes), 
54.95; iron shoes, No. 1 and smaller, light, 



We have on hand a large 
stock of steel sheets for 
making 

EMBOSSED 
CEILINGS, 

etc., and are now prepared 
to make prompt shipment 
of anything required in our 
line, and shall be pleased to 
receive your orders which 
shall have our best atten- 
tion. 



The Metallic Roofing Co. 

LIMITED 

Wholesale Manufacturers 
TORONTO, CANADA 



medium and heavy (all sizes), 53.85 ; snow 
shoes, 54 '» light steel shoes, 53.95; feather- 
weight (all sizes), 54-95- 

Screws — Business keeps fairly good. 
The discounts are as follows : Flat head 
bright, 87 }4 and 10 per cent.; round 
head bright, 82^ and 10 per cent. ; flat 
head brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round 
head brass, 75 and 10 per cent.; round 
head bronze, 65 per cent., and flat head 
bronze at 70 per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs— A good demand is 
reported this week for rivets. We quote : 
Iron rivets, 60 and 10 per cent. ; iron burrs, 
55 per cent.; copper rivets and burrs, 25 
and 5 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — An active trade is 
being done this week in bolts, and prices are 
unchanged. We quote as follows: Car- 
riage bolts, common (51 list), 55 and 5 
per cent,; carriage bolts, full square (52.40 
list), 60 and 5 per cent.; carriage bolts, 
Norway iron (53 list), 60 and 5 per cent.; 
machine bolts, all sizes, 55 and 5 per cent.; 
coach screws, 70 per cent. 

Rope — Another advance of %c. in the 
price of pure manila rope took place on 
January 9. We now quote : Pure manila, 
16c. ; British manila, i3J^c; sisal, 12c. 

Cutlery — Very little is being done in 
cutlery. 

Sporting Goods — Trade is quiet and 
featureless, 

Structural Material — For all kinds 
of structural material the demand is good. 

Milk Can Trimmings — These are going 
out quite freely this week, and a number of 
dealers are sending in requests for early 
shipment. Discount is 25 per cent., the 
same as last year. 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Granite and Tinware — The demand 
for both these lines is only fair. 

Cement— The outlook is a little better 
than last week, and a few inquiries have 
been made, but as yet no extensive orders 
have been placed, nor will there be till 
towards Spring. We quote : Canadian Port- 
land, Rathbun's "Star," #2.25 to $2.65; 
"Beaver," $2.10 to $2.50 ; "Ensign," 
$1.90 to $2.30; German, $3.15; English, $3; 
Belgian, $2.501012.75; Canadian hydrau- 
lic, $1.25 to $1.50 per bbl. 
METALS. 

Trade is, on the whole, fairly good. Tin 
is weak and lower, but in other metals 
prices are as a rule firm. 

Pig Iron — The pig iron market continues 
firm, and further advances are reported 
from the United States. For Canadian iron 
we still quote $17.50 to $18 on track 
Toronto for No. 2 foundry. 

Bar Iron — A good, steady demand 
is still to be noted, and prices rule firm. 
Base price $1.95 to $2 05. Extras cut to 
length while rolling : 2 jft. and over, 10c. 
per 100 lb.; 1 ft. and under 2 ft., 15c; 
under 1 ft., 20c. ; over 20 ft. by special 
agreement, according to length and size. 

Steel — Trade is quiet, but prices con- 
tinue firm. We quote: Merchantable cast 
steel, 9 to 15c. per lb.; drill steel, 8 
to 10c. per lb.; "BC" and "Black 
Diamond " tool steel, 10 to nc; Jessop's, 
Morton's and Firth's tool steel, 14c; 
toe calk steel, $2.85 to $3 ; tire steel, $2.30 
to $2.50 ; sleighshoe steel, $2.10 to $2.25; 
reeled machinery steel, $3, hoop steel, 
$3.10. 

Black Sheets — A fairly good business 
is still to be noted. We quote : Common, 
$3.15 for 28 gauge; and dead flat, $2.50 
for 26 gauge. 

Canada Plates — Trade is still good for 
this time of the year. We quote : All 
dull, $3.05 ; half polished, $3.15 ; all 
bright, $3.75. 

Galvanized Sheets — Some fairly good 
sized lots have been turned over during the 
week, and the demand generally is good. 
We quote as follows: "Queen's Head" 
brand at $4.50 in case lots, and $4.65 in 
less quantities. 

Tin — The outside markets are dull and 
lower. The idea as to price locally is $29 
to $30 per 100 lb. 

Tinplates — There is a fairly good 
movement, but stocks are short with some 
jobbers, shipments having been delayed in 
coming forward. The idea for coke plates 
is still $4.25 for I. C. 

Tinned Sheets — Quite a number of 
shipments are going forward, quite a num- 
ber of dealers being anxious to get delivery. 
We quote : 72 x 30, up to 24 gauge, 
7j£c; ditto, up to 26 gauge, 8c. 



Terne Plates — Business is almost nil. 
We quote : I.C., 20 x 28 gauge, at $8 50. 

Copper — The outside copper markets 
are a little firmer, although there does not 
appear to be much business doing. Locally, 
trade conditions are much about the same 
as a week ago. We quote ingot at $16 
per 100 lb. and sheet at $23 to $25 per 
100 lb. 

Brass — Quiet. Discount is 10 per cent, 
on rod and sheet. 

Solder — Business is moderate. We 
quote : Half-and-half, guaranteed, 19 to 
i9#c; do. commercial, 19c; refined, 
\%%c. ; wiping, 18c. 

Lead — At the time of writing lead is a 
little firmer in London but easier in St. 
Louis. Locally, business is fair at the recent 
decline. We quote : $3.50 to $3.75 for 
pig lead and $5 for bar. 

Iron Pipe — Business is just moderate. 
We quote : Black pipe, $5.40 for i-inch. 

Spelter — A moderate demand is being 
experienced. We quote $5.50 to $6 per 
100 lb. 

Zinc Sheet — Trade is fair at $6 to 
$6.25. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

The movement in paints and oils is 
beginning to show signs of improvement 
after the last few weeks of depression. The 
travellers have all gone out to their fields, 
and a more hopeful feeling is experienced 
regarding the coming season's trade. The 
prices of white lead ground in linseed oil 
have been lowered 25c. per 100 lb. by the 
paint grinders' association, and now the 
prices are quoted the same as at Montreal 
and other centres. The prices of raw and 
boiled oil ought to be very firm, as raw 
linseed has advanced on the Chicago 
market. We quote : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $5.87^ ; No. 1, $5.50; No. 2. $5. i2# ; 
No. 3, $4.75 ; No. 4, $4.37 % in pkgs. 
of 25 lb. and upwards ; y x c. per lb. extra 
will be charged for 12^ lb. pkgs. ; genuine 
dry white lead in casks, $5.12^. 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb. 
$S' 12t A'^ ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $5.50; No. 
i, in casks of 560 lb., $4 ; ditto, kegs of 
100 lb., $4.50. 
Litharge — Genuine, 6 to 6^c. 
Orange Mineral — Genuine, 7% to 8c. 
White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $6 to $6.25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Benzine — In barrel lots, i6^c. per gal.; 
less quantities, 25c. per gal. 
Paris White — 90c. to $1 per 100 lb. 
Whiting — 65c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 35c; in less 
than cases, 40c. per lb. 

Liquid Shellac— Pure orange, in bbls., 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
6d. and is. Canisters. 



WELLINGTON 



KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS Or 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Hills, London, England. 

Agent: 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 



COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y. 

Steel Carriage and 

Wagon Jacks, 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BY JOBBERS AT MFRS. PRICES. 



PRIEST'S QLIPPERS 

ffA^Si ^f Large* Variety. 
REA* ' ZZr-^ 's'/l Toilet, H»nd, Electric Power] 

ARE THE BEST. 

; Iigh«« Quality Grooming and 
Sbeep-Shearing Machine!. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

8KNT> FOB OATALOQUB TO 

amarlaaa Skearar *tg. Co., Naikna, I.H..C9A 





Don't Forget the Name. . . 

NEWMANS INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINGS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 
Will close a dooragainst any pressure of wind. Far 
ahead of ordinary door springs pneumatic or other- 
wise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



Oneida Community Goods 

HALTERS, COW TIES, SNAPS, etc., etc., 

in all sizes and styles. May be bad of all 
jobbers throughout Canada. 

Factory— NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. 



Mackenzie Bros. 

HARDWARE 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS, 

Travellers covering Manitoba, J WINNIPEG 
Northwest Territories and 
British Columbia. . 



MAN. 



Correspondence Solicited. 



" 1= u i_ i_ rvi a ivj " 

TROUSER or SKIRT HANGERS. 

TWO ^a^ SIZES 




PULLMAN SASH BALANCE CO., 

ROCHESTER, N.Y., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



27 



$2.25 to $2.35 ; white, $2.35 to #2.45 per 
gal.; in less quantities, 10;. extra. 

Putty —Bladders, in bbls., $2.25; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, #2.40; bulk in bbls., 
$1.90 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 
lb., 5*05 ; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., $2.90. 

Plaster Paris— New Brunswick, $1.90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, 52.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints— Pure, $1.20 to $1.30 per 
gal. 

Castor Oil — English, in cases, 9^ to 
ioc. per lb. and 10 to io^c. for single tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 77c; 
boiled, 80c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 76c; 
boiled, 79c, delivered. To Toronto, 
Hamilton and London, 2c. less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 59c; 2 
to 4 barrels, 58c, delivered. Toronto, 
Hamilton and London ic. less. For less 
quantities than barrels, 5c. per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5 gallon packages, 
50c, and 10 gallon packages, 80c. will be 
charged. 

GLASS. 

Things are quiet in glass. A little 
local retail trade is doing. We quote 
as follows : Under 26 in., $4.25 ; 26 
to 40 in., $4.65; 41 to 50 in., $5.10 ; 51 to 
60 in., $5.35 ; 61 to 70 in., $5.75; 
71 to 80, $6.25 ; 81 to 85, $7 ; 86 to 90, 
$7.75 ; Toronto, Hamilton and London. 
Terms, 4 months, or 3 per cent. 30 days. 
OLD MATERIAL. 

While there is no particular change in the 
copper market, it is conceded that bottom 
prices have now been reached, and that, 
while there may be no immediate rise, there 
will be no further decline. This week 
heavy copper has gone down ic. per lb.; 
new light scrap copper ic, bottoms 2c, 
coil wire ic, heavy red brass ic. and scrap 
rubber ^c. per lb. We quote as follows : 
Agricultural, 60c. per cwt. ; machinery cast, 
60c. ; heavy copper, nc. per lb. ; stove 
cast, 40c. ; No. 1 wrought, 50c. per 
100 lb. ; new light scrap copper, 9c. 
per lb.; bottoms, 8c; coil wire, 12c; 
light brass, 6c; heavy yellow brass 
t»8c ; heavy red brass, g l /iC ; scrap 
lead, 2#c. ; zinc, 2c ; scrap rubber, 
6c ; good country mixed rags, 50 to 
60c; clean dry bones, 40 to 45c. per 
100 lb. 

HIDES. SKINS AND WOOL. 

Trade is quiet. On account of their drop 
in the Chicago market green hides have 
gone down #c per lb. all around. This 
usually occurs every year, as the hides now 
marketed are of poorer quality, having 



KEARNEY & FOOTE BRAND 

FILES AND 

RASPS 




WARRANTED 



Files of the above 
brand are standard, and 
are well known for their ex 
cellence of cut, temper and fin- 
ish, and the K. & F. Horse Rasp is 
one of the leaders in this line, and is in 
demand in all parts of the Dominion. 
These goods are stocked by the following 
wholesale hardware merchants, and may be pro- 
cured from either of them at bottom prices : 



THE JAMES ROBERTSON CO., Winnipeg, Man. 
H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto, Ont. 
THE SEYBOLD k SONS CO., Montreal, Que. 



HOWDEN, STARKE &. CO., Montreal, P.Q. 
T. McAVITY & SONS, St. John, N.B. 
H. H. FULLER & CO., Halifax, N.S. 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 



Manufacturers of 



Set and Cap Screws, Speoial Hilled Work, Engine Studs. 
Etc Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 

INGERSOLL, ONT. 



longer hair and thinner skins. We quote 
prices paid by buyers on arrival : 

Hides — We quote: No. 1, green, 7^c; 
No. 2 green, 6j£c ; No. 1 green, steers, 8c; 
No. 2 green, steers, 7c; cured, 7^ to 
8*c. 

Skins — We quote: No. 1 calfskins, 9c; 
and No. 2, 7c; deacons (dairies) 55 to 60c 
each •/ sheepskins, 65 to 75c; deerskins, 
12 yi to 14c per lb. 

Wool — We quote: Fleece, 13c, and 
unwashed. 7 to 8c per lb. 
SEEDS. 

No further change has occurred, but the 
foreign export demand is rather better. 
We quote : Red clover, J 5 to J 5. 40 ; 
alsike, $6.50 to $8.50, and timothy, 52.25 
to $3 per bush. 

PETROLEUM. 

The movement is steady, with prices firm. 
We quote : Pratt's Astral, i6# to 17c. 
in bulk (barrels, extra) ; American 
water white, 17 to 17 #c. in barrels ; 
Photogene, i6j£ to 17c. ; Sarnia water 
white, 16 to i6#c in barrels; Sarnia prime 
white, 1 Mi to 15c in barrels. 
COAL. 

We see no change in the situation. Cars 
still are scarce. There has been no 
change in prices. We quote at inter- 



national bridges : Grate, $4 75 per 
gross ton ; egg, stove and nut, $5 per gross 
ton ; soft coal, $2.50 to $3.25 in bond, 
according to grade. 

MARKET NOTES. 

Pig tin is quoted lower at $29 to $30 per 
100 lb. 

Pure manila rope is %c. higher, being 
quoted at 16c. per lb. 

The prices for white leads ground in lin- 
seed oil have taken a drop of 25c per 
100 lb. 

The prices of heavy copper have gone 
down ic per lb. ; new light scrap copper, 
ic ; bottoms, 2c ; coil wire, ic. ; heavy 
red brass, IC, and scrap rubber, tfc. 
per lb. 

CAP D'OR COPPER PROPERTIES. 

In Cumberland County, N.S., a New York 
syndicate is working copper properties at 
Cap d'Or. Some of the ore is very rich, 
and the company has already expended 
over $ 100,000 in the work of development, 
employing over 100 men, who will shortly 
be increased to 150. A regular little village 
has sprung up around this mine, where 
many beautiful pockets of almost pure 
copper have been already found. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



NOVA SCOTIA MARKETS. 

Halifax, January 6, 1902. 

THIS is the season of the year, 
above all others, in which the 
hardware trade is tbe dullest, and 
except the ordinary city trade, there is 
little doing except stock taking, and 
straightening up stock for the current 
year's business. 

K. li. Dun ^: Co.'s report for the past 
year is summed up as follows: "Though 
profits generally were not so large as in 
1900, a larger volume of trade was done; 
sales increased considerably, and markets 
showed firmness and steadiness, especially 
in heavy metals." With this report the 
dealers generally agree as a fair state 
luenl 

The uoniii in Sydney of the last two 
years, consequent on the introduction 
and installation of The Dominion Iron 
and Steel L'o.'s works, has been of inter 
est to the whole Province ami Canada 
in general, and more especially to those 
engaged in the hardware trade. Iron, in 
large quantities, has been made for some 
months, but it remained for the closing 
days of 1901 in which to produce the 
lirst steel. 

The following is the message sent over 
(he wires to the directors of the com- 
pany, by Mr. Moxham, the manager, on 
December 30, and whicn produced a Hut 
ter of excitement and comment in iron 
circles, not alone in Canada, but the 
world over : " Poured first heat of steel 
at H o'clock to-night. Everything worked 
well. Steel made by ordinary pig and 
scrap process. Sixty per cent. Bell 
Island pig and 40 per cent, scrap. Qual- 
ity of steel is excellent.'' 



The sieel manufactured is in the form 
of ingots, and it is said that the com 
pauy have already found a .market for 
all they can produce. In about two 
weeks' time the blooming mill will be in 
operation, when the ingots will be con- 
verted into billets. As steel enters so 
largely in the various manufactures in 
all lines, its production insures the sue 
cess of The Dominion Iron and Steel 

Company. 

* * * 

The fust heat of steel produced about 
30 tons of steel. This was from one 
furnace, of which there are 10, each hav- 
ing a capacity of 50 tons per day. The 
company is now making steel regularly 
every day, and soon all the furnaces will 
be in operation. The success of the com- 
pany means much for Nova Scotia; it 
means much for Canada. 

* * # 

During the year 1001 the public ac- 
counts will show that the Dominion Gov- 
ernment has paid the following amounts 
in bounties on iron manufactures : On 
pig iron, $351,259.07 ; puddled bars, $16. 
703.09; steel ingots, $100,157.74. Next 
year will see the amounts largely in 

creased. 

K. C. H. 



TRAVELLERS WANT TO ORGANIZE. 

The advisability of forming a local 
commercial travellers' association at 
Peterboro' was discussed by a well at 
tended meeting last week at the Oriental 
Hotel there. It was decided to send a 



deputation to wait on the president of 
The Toronto Commercial Travellers' 
Association, and urge upon them the im- 
portance of the step contemplated. An 
other is to wait on The Dominion Com- 
mercial Travellers' Association, at Mont- 
real, for the same purpose. 

J. C. Grant, Secretary of The Peter- 
boro' Association, was instructed to 
write the various commercial travellers' 
organizations, that the names of any 
members residing in that town might be 
obtained. He was also requested to write 
the chief officer of The Toronto Travel- 
lers' Association, for as much informa- 
tion as would be required before organiz 
ing a camp in Peterboro'. 



THE COPP BROS. ft OO. AFFAIR. 

The Toronto Globe of the 9th instant, 
says : ' ' Hardware and Metal ' tells a 
remarkable story of the liquidation of 
the firm of Copp Brothers & Co., stove 
manufacturers, Hamilton. When one 
reads an article on a failure or liquida 
lion he expects to find some revelation of 
fraud or recklessness, resulting in heavy 
losses to creditors. In this case the re- 
markable fact is that every creditor has 
bi-en (mid in full, and that in spite of the 
enormous sacrifices made in winding up 
the business a handsome surplus remains. 
We used to hear a great deal about t ln- 
evil of incompetent men in business. The 
evil in this case is the needless forcihg 
out of business of honest and competent 
men, representing a firm which was estab- 
lished 53 years ago. 

" The direct cause of the liquidation, 
it is said, was > the action of the Mer-. 
chants Bank in insisting on the imme- 
diate payment of $37,000. The bank, no 
doubt, had a legal right to enforce its 
claim, and must be presumed to have un- 
derstood its own business ; but the 
result of the liquidation certainly makes 
the case a very strange one. It might be 
supposed that a firm able to make so 
good a showing would have been able to 
raise the money elsewhere. Whatever may 
have been the cause, the result is very 
much to be regretted." 



CANADIAN COAL FOR BOSTON. 

Tin- Dominion Coal Company have sue 
ceeded in securing an order of SO, 000 
tons for the Boston and Maine Railway, 
and a further order for some 15,000 tons 
for the Maine Central. At the presenl 
time in Boston there is delay in the mov- 
ing of coal, causing a scarcity. The duty 
of 07 cents a ton is, however, a barrier 
to Provincial coal companies taking ad- 
vantage of the scarcity. There is no 
foundation for the report that this com 
pany had sold 50,000 tons to a French 
railway. It is said that the company 
hail an offer from Italy to send some 30,- 
000 Urns, but the conditions were such 
that the offer had to be declined. Some 
coal has been sold in Sweden and there 
is hope of further sales. The company 
will send one or two of its experts, with 
a steamer to carry about 7,000 tons to 
that country, to initiate Swedish firemen 
into the secrets of most effectively handl 
ing the coal. To sell coal in Europe at 
this time is not so easy a matter as it 
would have been a year ago. Then prices 
win- stiff and steady, whereas now they 
are easy and uncertain. And yet there is 
hope that a good foreign trade may de- 
velop by degrees. — Mining Record. 



THE LONDON SCALE WORKS 

OEORQE M. FOX 

(Successor to John Fox ) 

Manufacturer of Railroad, tlay and 
Platform Scales. 

91 York Street, LONDON, QNT. 

•4 




Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishingto be representedin Canada. 



L 



Every Description, 
Sha pe and C olors 

ABELS 



Stock Labels forHardware trade 
UEVV& CO., 19 Leader Le., TORONTO 



The Long Distance 



Telephone 



IS THE •/.• 

IDEAL RAPID TRANSIT. 



Long distance equipment increases the 
speed, and cuts down overtime charges. 

The contract department will furnish particulars! 



THE BELL TELEPHONE CO. 
OF CANADA. 

The Grey and Bruce Portland 
Cement Company of Shallow 
Lake, Limited, 

Manufacturers of 
"HERCULES" BRAND OF 

Portland Cement 

Unsurpassed for Sidewalks, Floors, and all 

work requiring the Highest Grade 

of Portland Cement. 

HEAD OFFICE: OWEN SOUND. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



2ft 



THE PARCELL t r r u c p kTc e a? E s. 

Highly Knrlorspcl by 'fovprnnient Inspectors. 




Designed for Farm, Mill, Factory and Warehouse uses. 
Ask your Wholesale Dealer for cuts and prices, or write 

AYLMER IRON WORKS CO., Limited, AYLMER, ONT. 



BRITISH BUSINESS CHANCES. 

Finns desirous of getting into communication 
with British manufacturers or merchants, or who 
wish to buy British goods on the best possible 
terms, or who are willing to become Agents for 
British manufacturers, are invited to send partic- 
ulars of their requirements for 

FREE INSERTION 
in " Commercial Intelligence," to the Editor 
■SELL'S COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE,' 
168 Fleet Street, London, England. 

"Commercial Intelligence" circulates all over 
the United Kingdom amongst the best firms. Firms 
communicating should give reference as to bona 
fides. 

N.B. — A free specimen copy will be sent on re- 
ceipt of a post card. 



R. BAILEY & SON 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

STOVE LININGS '^tt! 

All kiodsof Fire Brick and Fire Clay Work, 

Paving Tile, etc. 

Wholesale Only, - - Write for particulars. 

1220 Yonge Street, TORONTO. 



Will Hold Dp a Shelf! 

That's what a shelf liracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be 

NOTHING BETTER 

NOTHING CHEAPER 

than the .... 

BRADLEY STEEL SHELF BRACKET 

It is well Japanned, Strong and Light. 

The saving in freight is a good profit, aside 
from the lower price at which the goods are sold, 
flf^ Order direct or through your jobber. 

ATLAS MFG. CO., New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 




ONTARIO SILVER CO., 



Limited 



NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

Manufacturer? of F «-ATWARE, CUTLERY and 
manutacturers 01 ELECTRO PLATE. 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 

'7HE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn " 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

Cables— Emlyn Engineering Works, 

' Machinery," Newport. Newport, Mon., ENGLAND. 

PERSONS addressing advertisers 
will kindly mention having 
seen their advertisement in 
Canadian Hardware and Metal 
Merchant. 



iWir^^'fnMfj^ 




% 

i 

1 

1 

1 


tow.: 


1 CryilllliH Suitirj Dill FnisL 


~«~SSS«B3«Br — 


TUT MCHAl.fl COnPANV. 





MURALO 



THE WALL 
FINISH 



The most perfect cold water wall finish in the cold 
water business. Put up in handsome packages, strong 
and well packed. More durable than any other wall finish. 
More beautiful, healthier and a bigger money-maker. The 
Muralo Co. is the wealthiest and largest of its kind in the 
world, and is ready to assist with advertising and to back up 
all its agents and dealers the world over. Write for particulars. 

A. RAMSAY * SON - MONTREAL) 

J. H. ASHDOWN - - WINNIPEG [ Agents 

McLENNAN, MoFEELEY & CO, VANCOUVErJ 



See IVou Don't 
Have to Pull. 
A Child Can Do It. 









NO. 16 



Walker's Self=Pulling: Cork Screws 

Made of Crucible Steel, Nickel Plated, Polished Apple Wood Handles. 

EVERY ONE TESTED AND GUARANTEED. Several imitations on the market, but none as good. 

mm. only by ERIE SPECIALTY CO., Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 



na/e: manufacture the: very best kinds of 

PAINT AND COLOR CANS 
VARNISH AND OIL CANS 
* PAINT PACKAGES 

ROUND AND SQUARE PAINT IRONS 

LYE TINS 

Our goods are guaranteed to be reliable, and to give entire satisfaction. Quotations gladly submitted for any quantity. 

TZBZIE .A-OIMIIE C^IN - "WOEKS 

Office and Factory : Ontario St. and Jeanne D'Arc A. venue. 

Jas B.Campbell. MONTEEAL. William Pratt. 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING and PLUMBING 



BUILDING IN TORONTO. 

For the first week of 1902 the following 
building' permits have been taken out in 
Toronto : Rose Ann Harrison, for a two- 
storey brick dwelling at 777 King street 
west, to cost §1,900 ; E. A. Druinmen, for 
a two-storey and attic brick dwelling at 
331 St. Clarence avenue, for $2,200 ; F. 
Caro, for alterations consisting of a 
stone cellar under his house at 968 
Queen street west, for $450 ; to A. G. 
Strathy, for alterations and new front of 
brick, wood, and glass to his shop at 
309 to 311 College street, for $200 ; Geo. 
Lasher, for two two-storey brick and 
stone stores and dwellings at 262 and 264 
Dundas street, for $2,500 ; Catherine Cor- 
bett, for a two-storey brick dwelling on 
Brock avenue, for $2,500 ; John Waldie, 
for brick alterations and additions to 
dwelling at 75 Park Road, for $4,500 ; 
Toronto City Corporation, for two hay 
barns, one large sheep pen, and addition 
to stable at the cattle market, on Well- 
ington avenue, for $3,750 r ; Toronto City 
Corporation, for hay barns, stable and 
office, all frame, with gravel roofs, at the 
cattle market annex, on Strachan ave., 
for $1,250 : and Marion Eastman, for a 
two-storey brick and roughcast dwelling 
on Woodbine avenue, for $900. 



NEW HOTEL AT NEWCASTLE, N.B. 

In a very short time a fine brick block, 
having a frontage of 103 feet with a 
depth of 70 feet, will be completed on 
N.B. It is faced with freestone and is 
the old Waverley Hotel site, at Newcastle, 
three storeys high, with a basement. The 
building is a very handsome structure 
with its neatly designed galvanized iron 
cornice, which adds much to its appear- 
ance. The building will contain a num- 
ber of offices besides being used as a dry 
goods store, and as the quarters of the 
Bank of Nova Scotia for that town. The 
architect is H. B. McDonald, of Chatham, 
N.B., while the contractors are John Mc- 
Donald & Co., also of Chatham. 



BUILDING IN MONTREAL FOR 1901. 

Montreal, during the year 1901, has 
been prosperous in the way of building 
operations, the revenue from the permits 
giving to the city alone the sum of 
$2,141.75. The total value of the new 
buildings erected during the past year 
is estimated at $2,568,372, and the re- 
pairs and alterations at $332,361, bring- 
ing the total up to $2,900,733. The total 
revenue for the Montreal Building Inspec- 
tor's Department, for the past year, 
amounted to $6,526.42, including water 
rates, for which $2,991.71 was obtained. 



IMPORTANT ARBITRATION CASE 

By a document made two years ago 
between The Rathbun Co., of Deseronto, 
and The Standard Chemical Co., of To- 
ronto, the former agreed to deliver a cer- 
tain quantity of wood to the chemical 
company, by whom it was to be convert- 
ed into charcoal. This charcoal was to 
be shipped to Deseronto, for use in the 
iron works there, The Standard Chemical 
Co. being entitled to the use of any 
gases or by-products obtained in the pro- 



cess of manufacture. This agreement is 
yet to remain in force six years, but a 
dispute recently occurred, and now the 
matter is left to arbitration before Judge 
Macdougall, Christopher Robinson, K.C . 
and S. Lazier, local master at Belleville. 
The amount involved is said to be large. 



BUILDING IN GALT. 

There have been 37 new houses erected 
at Gait during the year 1901, at a cost 
of $61,900, while alterations and repairs 
to buildings reached $31,135. Only $4,000 
was spent on business blocks, but over 
$48,000 was expended for manufacturing- 
establishments. There were $12,000 worth 
of unclassified building operations, the 
total of which was over $157,710. 



BUILDING OPERATIONS IN SIX 
TOWNS. 

Below is given a list showing the value 
of the building operations in the six 
towns of Gait. Woodstock, Stratford. 
Waterloo, Wingham, and Listowel, all 
neighborong rivals. Gait leads with 
$157,510, while Listowel comes last with 
$37,420 : 

Gait $157,510 

Woodstock 150,000 

Stratford 100,000 

Waterloo 90,000 

Wingham 75,000 

Listowel 37,420 



BUILDING NOTES 

The parish of Charlesbourg, P.E.T., has 
decided to build a new church. 

Dennis Kelly is going to build a brick 
cottage, to cost $700, on King William 
street, Hamilton. Ont. 

Peter Innes is building a new residence 
on his farm, at Coldbrook, Wolfville, 
Nova Scotia. 

A new Roman Catholic church is to be 
built in the Little Farm district. Hull, 
Que. Tenders are now being received. 



W. E. Tracey, of W. E. Tracey & Co.. 
plumbers, Winnipeg, is dead. 



C.P.R. LOWER RATES TO THE WEST 

The Canadian Pacific Railway Company 
has issued a circular reducing its freight 
rates from the east to Manitoba and the 
Northwest points for the year 1902. Bv 
comparing the following the nature of 
these reductions can be seen : 

Toronto to Fort W: 
first class, $1.35 ; secon 
90c: fourth. 65c: fifth. 
New rate, first class, $ 
third, 66c; fourth, 47c: 
34c. 

Toronto to Winnipeg, 
class. $1.81 ; second. $1. 
Fourth. 97c: fifth, 82c; 
late, first class. $1.78 
third, $1.21 ; fourth, 
sixth, 73c. 

There are also corresponding reductions 
to Northwestern points. Under the 
Crow's Nest Pass agreement tariffs, the 
commodity rates have also been lowered. 



illiam, 


old 


rate. 


id. $1.15 ; 


third. 


57c; 


sixtr 


i. 48c 


1 ; second, 


82c : 


fifth, 


40c; 


sixth, 


, old 


rate. 


first 


.55 : third. 


$1.24 : 


sixth 


. 74c 


New 


; second. 


$1 .52 : 


95c; 


fifth, 


80c: 



MARITIME PROVINCE BUSINcSS 
MEN. 

I had a talk the other day with W. 
H. Seyler, who for over five months has 
been travelling through Quebec, New 
Brunswick, and Nova Scotia, for The F. 
F. Dallcy Co., of Hamilton. 

It was Mr. Seyler's first visit to the 
Maritime Provinces, and. he was naturally 
busy forming his impressions as well as 
selling goods, and he appears to have 
succeeded well in both respects. " It is 
pleasant," he said, " to do business with 
the merchants in the Maritime Provinces. 
They are conservative in their way of 
doing business, but they are most friend- 
ly and sociable, and I received every 
courtesy. Most of them complain, how- 
ever, that the balance of trade between 
the Maritime Provinces and Western Can- 
ada is largely in favor of the latter. 

" One thing I regretted to learn and 
that was that there appears to be a 
house here and there in Ontario that 
thinks it can use the Maritime Provinces 
as a dumping ground for cheap and in- 
ferior goods. The result has been to 
bring a discredit upon western goods and 
to make it extremely difficult to introduce 
new goods there." 

Mr. Seyler said that Sydney was a 
revelation to him on account of the ex- 
tent of the steel and iron works and the 
magnificence of the harbor. " Business," 
he said, " is rather overdone, too many 
merchants having opened up there. This, 
of course, will remedy itself in time. 

" Wherever I went I saw ' Hardware 
and Metal.' This was a source of 
gratification to me, for it kept me well 
in touch with trade conditions in the 
west during my five months' absence." 

The business men of the Province of 
Quebec, Mr. Seyler speaks most high I v 
of, and particularly their quickness in 
coming to a decision and their general 
courtesy. 



A GOOD MOVEMENT. 

In the Maritime Provinces of Nova 
Scotia and New Brunswick tourists' asso- 
ciations have been working effectively for 
a number of years. The towns and cities 
have been beautified, and thousands of 
tourists have annually come from the 
New England States, Boston, and New 
York, and other cities farther south. The 
residents of these Provinces have reaped 
a golden harvest, while everybody has 
been benefited by the increased steamship 
service, the enlargement of the hotels and 
other public improvements rendered ne- 
cessary to accommodate these visitor 

Now, in Victoria, B.C., a number of 
leading citizens have met together, 
formed themselves into a tourist asso- 
ciation, adopted a constitution and have 
laid out plans whereby they hope to 
greatly beautify the town, and by ex- 
tensive advertising through the news- 
papers, guide books and circulars, at- 
tract from all points tourists during the 
summer. Comment in many other cen- 
tres of population and trade has been 
excited and people are largely watching 
to see what the results will be. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



31 



WHITE 
LEAD 

Let us book you for White Lead. You might as well 
be booked against any advance in price. 

RAMSAYS LEAD: 

UNICORN PURE .... $5.37^ 

RUSSIAN PURE .... 5.375* 

DECORATORS PURE - - - 5-STA 

EXTERIOR "RAMSAYS" - - 5.50 

THISTLE 5.50 

DECORATORS NO. I - - - 5 50 

CRESCENT STAR .... 5.125* 

DECORATORS SPECIAL - - 5 I2K 

ALBION 4 75 

LONDON ---.._ 4.371* 

We can book you at these prices now, for shipment up to 15th May next. 
F.O.B. Montreal, Toronto, Ottawa, Hamilton, London, Windsor, Ont., St. 
John, N.B., and Halifax, or freights equalized on these points. Send your 
specification and say when it is to be shipped. 

If you have " RAMSAYS EXTERiOR" you have the leader in the 
lead market. More economical, better to wear and whiter than pure. 



A. RAMSAY & SON 

MONTREAL 



Est'd 1842 



PAINT MAKERS 



BURMAN & SONS' clippers 



Established 1871. 



for Horsemen 



BIRMINGHAM, ENG. '.:bX' 




NO. 297. 



NO. 3 POWER CLIPPER, "with^'Wrist: Joint.' 

(The Czar of Russia. 
As supplied to -J The King of Denmark. 
(Earl Roberts, Etc., Etc. 





THE "LEOPOLD" TOILET. 



THE "WARWICK" 

CLIPPER. 

Cuts over thraa teeth. 

As supplied to 

His Majesty's 
War Department. 



SEND FOR PRICE LIST AND TERMS. 

To be obtained from all the principal Jobbers throughout 
the Dominion. 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from, and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject." 

CANADIAN PRESS CUPPING BUREAU, 

232 McGill Street. MONTREAL, QUE. 
Telephone Main 1255. 
10 Front St. East, Toronto. Telephone 2701 




You may be looking for 
a Good 



Pipe Hanger. 



Ask us about 

t he"Grabier.' 



We send you booklet illustrating 
the different kinds. 



The James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co. 



TORONTO. 



Limited. 




Canadian Representative: ALEXANDER GIBB, 13 St. John St.. MONTREAL. 
75 YEARS. ESTABLISHED 1825. 75 YEARS. 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 



NEW YORK OFFICB. 90 Chamber! St. 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. {51^^.^^! 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COM 
PROMISES. 

NGARANT. general merchant and 
mill owner, Caplin River, Que., 
« has compromised at 10c. on the 
dollar. 

A. Desmarais, genera] merchant. Marie 
\ die. Que. has compromised. 

W. E. Douper, general merchant, Wood- 
ham. Out., is offering to compromise. 

M. Ormstein & Co., general merchants, 
St. Pdlycarpe, <jue. , have compromised. 

J. L. Aubert, general merchant, St. 
Eloi, Que., has assigned to V. E. Paradis. 

A winding-up order has been applied 
for re The Brampton Gas Co., Brampton. 
Out, 

The creditors of Gurney & Co., general 
merchants, Acton, Ont., held a meeting 
on January 3. 

.1. .1. Fluetot's interest in mining pro- 
perties at Kaslo, B.C., has been seized 
by the sheriff. 

Elliot & Borlands, general merchants, 
Steinbach Station, Man., have assigned 
to C. H. Newton. 

The creditors of C. B. B'Entrement. 
general merchant. Middle East Pubnico, 
N S . held a meeting on January 6. 

E. F. Cowan, general merchant. Novar, 
Out., has assigned to F. H. Lamb. Ham 
ilton. His creditors met on January 7. 

The Gardner, Rice, McLeod Co., of 
Ontario, Limited, departmental store. 
Rat Portage, Ont., is asking an exten- 
sion. 

Charles Tremblay, general merchant. 
St. Boniface de Shawenegan. Que., has 
assigned, and V. E. Paradis is the pro- 
guardian. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DIS- 
SOLVED. 

Churchill & McKay, general merchants, 
Elburne, B.C.. have dissolved. 

J. H. Morris & Co., general merchants, 
Edmonton. N.W.T., have dissolved. 

J. T. McDonald & Co., general mer 
chants, Calgary, N.W.T., have dissolved. 

Asher & Leeson. general jobbers. To 
ronto. Arnprior. Gait, Napanee, Owen 
Sound. Picton, and Port Hope, Ont.. are 
about to dissolve. Harry Leeson retir- 
ing. 

Lessen & Bauer, lumber 
tural implement merchants. 
N.W.T.. have dissolved. 

Lamplough & McNaughton, commission 
hardware merchants, Montreal, have dis- 
solved, and a new partnership has been 
registered. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

Chester Thompson, general merchant, 
Selkirk West, Man., is giving up business 
there. 

The stock of J. P. Ross, general mer 
chant. Exeter. Ont., was sold by auction 
on January 9. 

M. P. PloufFe, general merchant. Lady- 
smith and Shawville. Que., is selling off 
his stock at Ladysmith. 

The assignee of Alex. Chisholm, gen 
eral merchant. Nova Scotia, is advertis- 
ing for tenders for the stock. 

G. Guimond & Co., general merchants. 
Ste. Angele. Riniouski Co., Que., has 
sold his stock a1 Ofirjc. on the dollar. 

The assets of J. C. Chouinard, general 



and agricul- 
Westaskiwin. 



general merchant, 
is succeeded bv 



il 



merchant, St. Charles, Bellechasse, Que., 
were advertised to be sold on January S. 

T. A. Kennedy is advertising his sash 
and door factory at Owen Sound, Ont., 
for sale. 

The assets of The Diamond Machine and 
Screw Co., of Toronto, Limited, are to 
he sold by tender. 

The assets of George Daglish, sr., 
manufacturer of matches, Hull, Que., are 
to be sold by auction on January 17. 

CHANGES. 

Joseph Boyd, general merchant, Horn 
by, Ont., is giving up business. 

Arthur Snazel, painter, Stratford, 
Ont., is removing to Goderich. 

The Columbus Building Association, 
Quebec, has applied for a charter. 

The assets of Geo. S. Kimber, painter, 
Montreal, are to be sold by tender. 

Rutler & Fitzpatriek, general mer- 
chants, Birtle, Man., are giving up busi- 
ness. 

\\ . •). Wilcox & Co., Limited, Virden, 
Man., general merchants, are applying for 
a charter. 

The Chicago Copper and Smelting Co., 
Limited, Greenwood, B.C., has been in- 
corporated. 

The Cochshutt Blow Co., Limited, 
Roland, Man., have sold out to Ghaytor 
& McDonald. 

W. S. Rodgers & Son, hardware mer 
chants, Guelph, Out., have sold out to 

Will. .1. Seeds. 

M. J. McKen/ie. 
Dodger's Cove, B.C. 
Horris Walters. 

R. H. Benson & Co. 
chants, Indian Head, N.W.T., have- sold 
out to J. J. Mills. 

The assets of Wm. Smith, general mer- 
chant, Point Gatineau, Que, have been 
sold to A. J. Smith. 

FIRES. 

F. J. Ramsay's general store, at Dunn- 
\ die. Out., was damaged by fire. 

Mann & Co.. general merchants. 
Petrolea, Ont., suffered loss by fire. In- 
sured. 

The general store of T. A. Newman & 
Bros., Portage la Prairie. Man., has been 
burned. 

The Moiden Manufacturing Co., office 
files, etc.. Gananoque, Ont.. ha\e been 
burned out ; insured. 

Alexander Sauriol. general merchant 
and cattle buyer, Montebello, Que., has 
been burned out. The loss is partially 
covered by insurance. . 

DEATHS. 

.1. E. Westcott & Co., hardware and 
furniture merchants, West Lome, Ont.. 
have sold out to B. Partridge. 

The Ottawa Showcase Co.. who have 
curried on their business on the corner 
of Florence and Bay streets, Ottawa, 
have made an assignment to William A. 
Cole. 

For some time a number of Winnipeg 
and United States capitalists have been 
taking into their serious consideration the 
scheme of transmission of electric power 
lo Winnipeg from an outside point. Now. 
preparations are under way to- establish 
a plant to furnish that city with motive 
power at half the present cost. This was 
announced at Winnipeg by F. W. Thomp- 
son, at the travellers' banquet. 



PAINTERS 
PERFECT 
WHITE 
LEAD 



Manufactured by the 
Latest and most 
Approved Method, 
Securing Whiteness, 
Permanence, and the 
Greatest Covering 
Power. 

This Lead is a new and scientific com- 
bination of materials which are in them- 
selves perfect pigments, ground in pure 
refined Linseed Oil. It will be found on 
trial to be the whitest lead ever intro- 
duced, besides which it has great cover- 
ing power, works well under the brush, 
and shows up tints sharp and clear. In 
thinning, it takes more Oil than any 
other Lead, and will, therefore, cover 
more surface. It will also wear better 
either on inside or outside work than any 
paint ever offered before. 

THE 

CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY 

LIMITED 

Sole Manufacturers 

MONTREAL. 



Order early — 
We are already booking a large 
number of orders for Painters 
Perfect. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 



head orr/c£. 

TORONTO 



NEWMARKET. LONDON 

MONTREAL. W NNIREB. 




Ibronto. 



DICTATED BY 



To the Trade: — 



January 11, 1902. 



With the object of placing oar businesses on a more permanent footing 
and not subject to the interruptions which are liable to occur in an 
ordinary partnership or company, we have consolidated into "UNITED 
FACTORIES, Limited," which will enable us at the same time to greatly ex- 
tend our manufacturing and marketing facilities. 

The policy of the Company will be to supply the trade, and through 
it the consumers of Canada, with a better article than has been possible in 
the past, and at no increase in cost, and having ample capital will be in 
a position to buy its raw materials for cash to the very best possible 
advantage, and, through carrying large and complete stocks of finished 
goods, be able to serve you with the greatest promptness. 

As the personnel of the management will not be changed in any way, we 
are not writing as though the pleasant connections, which have existed iivl 
the past, were to be severed; in fact, the well-known brands of Boeckh's 
Standard Brushes and Brooms, Bryan's London Brushes, and Cane's Newmarket 
Woodenware, will continue to be our leading standard lines, and with the 
same push and energy that has characterized these businesses in the past we 
look to an increased and continued connection with your house in the future. 

All accounts due to Boeckh Bros. & Company, Toronto; Thos. Bryan, 
London, and The Wm. Cane & Sons Manfg. Co., Limited, Newmarket, are to be 
paid direct to them, and they will settle all accounts due by them respec- 
tively, as the new Company does not assume any book debts or liabilities. 

Our Catalogue for 1902 is now under way and will be distributed at 
an early date, and our travellers will have the pleasure of calling on you 
very shortly with complete sets of samples, and as our prices have been 
,very carefully revised and a large number of new lines added, we would ask 
you to kindly withhold your orders until they have the opportunity of 
seeing you and quoting prices. 

Yours very truly, 



Signed, 



Boeckh Bros. & Company. 
Thos. Bryan. 

The Wm. Cane & Sons Manfg. Co., Limited. 
. UNITED FACTORIES, LIMITED. 



34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



W*»*VVM/ 



THE ADVERTISING ARENA, 

Hints and Ideas for Business Men. 



'. V\VVMt«1-VWWVWWWWWWVWWWVW\ - 



<< 



Mail Orders. 

A GOOD paying u ail order business 
is appreciated most by the fellow 
who had to work hardest to estab- 
lish it. You never saw a summer snap that 
was satisfactory after the thermometer had 
tumbled 20 degrees. 

The mail order man's ad. is his fortune. 

Little conscience or no conscience at all 
has no place in the mail order business. 

There are but two kinds of ads. The 
one takes money out of your till ; the other 
puts money in. 

Don't get discouraged in your advertis- 
ing. Success comes in a way ard at a 
time we little dream of. 

Don't write a misleading ad. The 
fellow who buys a chestnut horse is not 
going to be satisfied with a horse chestnut. 

The good reputation of a mail order 
man is worth more to him than a degree of 
Doctor of Divinity from a State university. 

The line between failure and success is 
so closely drawn that mail order men fre- 
quently do not know which side they are 
on. 

If you want to succeed in the mail order 
business, scheme ! scheme ! all the time. 
Out-scheme the other fellow is the only safe 
way. 

If some mail order men would spend as 
much time and exercise, as much care in 
writing their ads. as they did in writing 
their first love letter, the failures in the 
business would be reduced one half. — Jabs. 

The Time to Advertise. 

When the grain has all been gathered, 

When the harvest is all through, 

When the husbandman and family 

Have not a thing to do 

But sit around the fire 

And read and talk about 

The many things they have to buy 

That can't be done without ; 

Oh, that's the time of all the year 

A man should advertise — 

When the frost is on the pumpkin, 

And the pumpkin's in the pies. 

— Jabs. 

The Most Important Advertising. 

Somebody has said that trade journal 
advertising as a class is the most impotent 
of all advertising. 

Somebody struck it pretty nearly right. 

This sad state of affairs cannot generally 
be laid at the door of the trade paper pub- 



lisher. This scion of the shears and pen is 
generally anxious for his clients to furnish 
good copy. 

It wasn't a hundred years ago that pub- 
lishers deprecated generally the frequent 
changes of ads. They have had their eyes 
opened for quite a spell now. They realize 
that an advertisement must be fresh and 
newsy, like the rest of the journal. Tbey 
have come to learn that the advertiser who 
sticks to them is the advertiser whose returns 
are satisfactory. They have sense enough 
to delve behind the whys of things and 
realize that the advertiser who gets returns 
is the advertiser who advertises. 

And the advertiser who advertises well is 
the advertiser who changes his ads. every 
issue, unless (and it is a rare instance) he 
has evolved some peculiarly bright and 
particularly strong drawing card. 

Even then it will lose a good share of its 
effectiveness after being run twice. 

Besides this, its moral effect on the bulk 
of readers is bad. 

For instance : There are large classes of 
people who take trade journals, and if they 
take them they look through them. It 
would be a rarity to find a dealer who looks 
through the editorial and news columns of 
his trade journal who does not look through 
the advertising pages. 

He learns that Peter Jones & Co.'s ads. 
are always attractive and entertaining, and, 
as he turn over his pages every week or 
every month, he stops at Peter Jones & Co.'s 
say-so. 

Should he find this week the same story 
that he read last week and the week before, 
it is a shock to him and a disappointment, 
and he is very apt to lose faith in Peter 
Jones & Co.'s advertisement — or at least 
lose interest. 

Besides, he naturally gets the notion into 
his head that Peter Jones & Co. are going 
to tell the same story over and over indefi- 
nitely. This is all the more true of the 
man who has not made a particular note of 
Peter Jones & Co.'s advertising, but who 
has read it because it caught his eye and 
appealed to his reason, but who, as stated 
before, has never made any particular note 
of Peter Jones & Co.'s advertising. 

One or two experiences like this will keep 
him away from these ads. 

This is not only true of the reading mat- 



ter, but even more so of the designs used 
for display. 

This part of the work is first seen of all. 
That is its object. 

The reader who notices your advertise- 
ment on account of its display design this 
week is, of course, impressed with it, else 
he would not have noticed it. 

Next week, if he runs up against the same 
thing, he imagines it is the same all the 
way through, reading and everything, and 
he has no particular longing to review it. 

There is nothing like keeping advertising 
green. It can be made just as newsy as 
the news column. It can be made more 
newsy for the pure and simple reason that 
it strikes the dealer right close to his heart 
— his own business. 

It means dollars and cents to him. It 
means just exactly what he is in business 
to get. 

If you tell a dealer that you can help him 
and furnish him a better line of goods for 
less money, or in which there is more profit 
for him, and if you make him believe it, 
you will interest him. 

He can be made to believe it if he is 
kept after persistently enough and given 
good hard nuts of wisdom to ponder on, 
That can never be done by general state- 
ments and outlandish claims and high- 
sounding words and such doddering rot 
which the trade papers are about 90 per 
cent, full of, and which is the fault, first, 
last and all the time of the advertisers 
themselves. 

A man who has accumulated enough 
worldly wisdom to accumulate enough coin 
of the realm to surround himself with a 
stock of goods is a man generally who likes 
common sense. 

He isn't very sentimental or poetical. He 
is hard business. There isn't a great deal 
of difference between a farmer and a 
country merchant. One is usually the 
outcome of the other. One is horny-handed 
and the other is horny brained. Such a 
dealer is not affected to any alarming extent 
by bare, bald statements. What strikes 
him is a pointed argument — pointed at 
both ends. 

The sooner manufacturers and jobbers 
and wholesalers realize this and will quit 
soaring to heaven the minute they get a 
pencil in their clutches to write out their 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



35 



\^7"E have 
the nic- 
est set of Hose 
samples ever 
shown to the 
Canadian & 
trade. Don't 
fail to see 
them. 



HOSE 

GARDEN 

STEAM 

SUCTION 

ETC. 

Send for samples and quotations. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



YK/'E make 
Hose of 
all kinds for all 
purposes. Our 
equipment is 
the most mod- 
ern and our 
goods are per 
fection. 



THE DURHAM RUBBER CO., limited 

Bowmanville, Ont. 



I 



THE LIGHTING BUSINESS OF CANADA 

We are after the lighting business of Canada. We have 
a liberal share of it already, but we are always open for 
more. We want 1902 to be a 
record maker. We have the best 
lights and our terms and prices are 
right. 

OUR LEADERS 

The Cosmopolitan Gas Lamps and 
Mantles — Up - to - Date American 
lights, brilliant and durable. 

We can sell these goods at lowest 
mannfaotnrers' prices in Chioago. with 
duty added. This is a remarkably low 
price . 

The Rochester Lamp — A leader 
always when oil is used. Central 
draft, 80 to 400 candle power. 

FULL STOCK OF THESE GOODS 
ALWAYS ON HAND. 




Write us for particulars. 



THE ROCHESTER LAMP CO. OF CANADA 

24 Front St. West, TORONTO. 



Pittsburg Steel Wall Tie. 

Manufactured by THE McDOWELL MAN'FG CO., 
PITTSBURG, PA. 




Patented Feb. 28, 1899 Aug. 21, 1900. 

For Bonding Face Brick, Terra Cotta, Hollow Walls, Etc, 



For Sale By 



THE LUXFER PRISM CO., Limited, 

98 and 100 King West. 

AIKENHEAD HARDWARE CO., Limited, 

6 Adelaide East, TORONTO, ONT. 



3G 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



advertisements, the sooner trade paper 
advertising will increase its effulgence 
several candle-powers for good. 

Which means that it will increase the 
advertiser's wherewithal several tinkling 
dollars. 

It is almost enough to give one goose 
pimples to run through the pages of the 
trade papers and see the good, costly, 
liberal spaces which are filled with mostly 
just about nothingness. 

Would it not be more to the point and a 
better investment for the advertiser who has 
not the time or the inclination to prepare 
proper copy to put a little money into this 
part of the work alongside of the money he 
puts into the space itself ? 

Good copy and good space are insepar- 
able for good. Divided, the whole thing 
falls. As a usual thing, good copy costs 
less than space. Generally It costs very 
much less. 

But where a $100 space is not worth $1 if 
it lacks good copy, an additional outlay of 
from $10 to $25 to procure good copy will 
increase the worth of the space not only to 
what it actually cost, but more, and make it 
a gilt-edge paying investment. 

Where is the philosophy of doing other- 
wise, unless the advertiser has a combination 
of the two — good space and good talk ?- - 
Current Advertising. 

How to Judiciously Distribute. 

An enormous amount of money is annu- 
ally wasted through the injudicious distribu- 
tion of advertising matter. This is true in 
many lines of publicity, from the unpre- 
tentious and annoying handbill of the 
country grocer to the elegantly-printed and 
expensive booklet or catalogue of the manu- 
facturer and the manufacturer's agent. In 
many cases this waste is brought about 
through carelessness — in more cases it is a 
direct result of ignorance. 

To begin at the bottom. The handbill, 
or "dodger," as it is more familiarly 
known, is practically a dead loss to the 
advertiser. From a business point of view 
there is absolutely nothing to it. People 
don't have time to read this kind of stuff, 
and even if" they did there is nothing 
about a black and white piece of common 
paper to catch the eye, and granting that 
even if the attention were attracted there is 
ordinarily nothing in the character of the 
reading matter calculated to interest the 
reader. The handbill is a dead failure — 
that's flat. 

Now, to leave the retail man and his 
ideas. 

The expensively - designed and hand- 
somely - executed folder and booklet so 
much in vogue at present is frequently 



distributed in a reckless and unprofitable 
manner. There are firms to-day who put a 
whole lot of money in this class of work 
without having any fixed or definite plan as 
to the distribution of the same. It would 
appear that, upon the delivery of this 
booklet or folder in question by the printer, 
all interest in the placing thereof ceases. 

Lists are an unknown quantity to the 
careless advertiser, or even if such lists are 
used they are worked over indiscriminately 
without regard as to whether this person or 
that person will be in any way interested in 
the goods exploited. It is too often a case 
of " get 'em off as quickly as possible and 
have done with it." 

When it comes to a matter of dollars and 
cents this carelessness or ignorance is bound 
to cost somebody dear. Just supposing, for 
instance, that a firm sends out 20,000 
booklets costing 5c. each. Of this number, 
say, 5,000 are wasted by injudicious 
distribution. It's simply a case of $250 
gone to the everlasting bow-wows, not 
counting postage. 

Now, don't think this is painting the 
matter in colors too strong. Cases such as 
the above do exist, as the writer will affirm 
with positive knowledge to back him up. 

Books, booklets, folders and other adver- 
tising novelties can and will prove an 
impetus to business if distributed with a 
proper amount of care and consideration ; 
otherwise, this publicity scheme will be as 
futile as the endeavors of a man who tries 
to empty a tub of water through the use of 
a coarse mesh coal screen. 

There is just as much virtue in an 
intelligently- made up list as there is in the 
quality of the advertising matter sent out. 
An advertisement sent to one promising 
customer is worth 20 received by the waste- 
basket, becausenot-in-my-line type. — Ad. 
Sense. 

Lacking Nerve. 

Many new advertisers are lacking in 
nerve, says a contemporary : They won't 
keep at it long enough. (All the better for 
the bulldog fellow who hangs on.) The 
public is a big thing. It is hard to stir up. 
It moves slowly sometimes, wants to get 
acquainted first. Likes to deal with well- 
known people. The only way to get 
acquainted and become well known is to 
keep.on advertising. The first investment 
may not pay at once, but, like the founda- 
tion of a house, it is necessary even if it is 
underground. When additional storeys 
appear the house is a landmark, and not 
until then. — Agricultural Advertising. 

The Hard=to-Get Customer. 

Some advertisers stop short of the reader 
who is hard to convince, aiming their ads. 



and follow-up literature at the susceptible 
souls who are open to conviction, says 
Printers' Ink : But the reader who is 
hardest to transform into a customer is 
usually best worth going afcer. Not only 
will he make the staunchest customer,. once 
he has been brought to book, but he will 
carry weight with his neighbors. He is 
almost invariably an arbiter of opinions in 
his community, and what he thinks or says 
is of more importance than what is said or 
thought by the fickle. 

How to Do It. 

Bright ideas in advertising or in other 
lines do not come merely as " inspirations," 
remarks an exchange. They come with 
hard work more often ; with application and 
continued application. The man who keeps 
at advertising sends out the best ads. always, 
not the occasional writer who picks up tablet 
and pencil, announcing mentally to himself: 
" Now I'll write a regular stunner." 

As you look over the field who are the 
men distinguished by brilliant advertise- 
ments ? They are the firms who work at it 
daily — whose names and goods hold the 
public eye every hour of the day. You can 
name them at once. 

Keep at it. That's the motto for steady 
as well as brilliant work. 

Signs and Sayings for Advertisers. 

A much talked-of store. 

Our patrons wear smiles. 

Values that are revelations. 

Our goods are this year's vintage. 

Nothing worth having is not here. 

Each day here is "bargain day." 

Our low prices bring you back. 

Every shelf teems with bargains. 

Perfect service promptly rendered. 

We expand values and condense prices. 

Telephone us for what you forget. 

We don't promise the earth for a nickel. 

Our method of selling invites you back. 

We are here to think of your interests. 

Your coming merely to look pleases us. 

Cross the street first ; then come here. 

Our clerks are here to assist, not to insist. 

You don't wait here — you're waited upon. 

What you buy thoughtfully we buy back. 

The goodness of our goods goes without 
saying. 

Incomparable values at unmatchabl 
figures. 

"Spoils from every clime" are congre- 
gated here. 

Our clerks serve us well by serving you 
well. 

It pleases us to say that we are here to 
please. 

We couldn't afford to give you a bad 
bargain. 

To see our goods is a "liberal educa- 
tion " in trade. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



37 



li 



MIDLAND 



JJ 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Prices to Sales Agents 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

or to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 



"The Peerless" 



is the best Bolster Spring ever 
produced. A fine line for the 
hardware trade, write ih For Price-.. 




James Warnock & Co, 



Gait, Ont 



CUKKEflT JWAHKET QUOTATIONS. 



January 10, 1902. 
These prices arc tor such finalities aud 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for largerquantitiesand 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Kditor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list as the desir 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots, 10} lb. 29 CO 30 00 

Tinplates. 

Charcoal Plates — Bright 

M.L.S., equal to Bradley. F<rbo\ 

I.C., usual sizes $6 75 

I.X., " 8 25 

I.X.X., " 9 75 

Famous— 

I.C 6 75 

I.X 8 25 

I.X.X 9 75 

Raven & Vulture Grades— 

I.C, usual sizes • 5 00 

I.X., " 6 00 

t.X.X " 7 00 

I. XXX," 8 03 

D.C., 12'/ 2 xl7 4 50 

D.X 5 25 

D.X.X G 00 

Coke Plates— Bright 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C. .usual sizes 4 25 

I.C, special sizes, base 4 60 

20x28 9 00 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.C, 20x28, 112 sheets 8 50 

I. X. , Terne Tin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Pla 

Cookley Grade— Per lb. 
X X.,14x56,50sheetbxs) 

" 14x60, " > .... 06% 
•' 14x65. " > 
Tinned Sheets 

7 „'x30 up to 24 gauge 07'/ 2 

" 26 " 08 

Iron and Steel. 

Common Bar, per 100 lbs.... 195 2 05 

Refined " " 2 45 

Horse Shoe Iron 2 40 

Hoop steel, 1% to 3 in. base, 3 10 

Sleigh Shoe Steel " base .... 2 10 

Tire Steel.. ... 2 30 2 50 

Reeled Machinery .... 3 00 

Toe Calk Steel 2 85 3 00 

T Firth & Cos tool steel.per lb 12'/i 13 

.Tessop's tool Steel 14 

Morton's tool steel C 12% 13 

Black Diamond and "B.C." 

o tool steel 10 11 

Qchas Leonard's tool steel.... 08 09 

Drill Steel, per lb C8 10 

Boiler Tnbei. 

IVi-inoh 012'/* 

o ** U U 

2% •■ '■',.. 15 

j A " 016 

3i/„ •■ ■" ;;: o 20 

4 •• ::::::::::.:....... 025 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

■4inoh 250 260 

3-16 msh 2 60 2 70 

% inoh and thioki r 2 50 2 60 

Black Sheets. 

Com. D.FI. 

18 gauge : 2 85 3 00 

02 gauge 2 85 3 CO 

22to24 " 2 95 3 25 

26 " 3 05 3 50 

28 " 3 15 .... 



Camilla Plates. 

All dull, 52 sheets 3 05 

Half polished 3 15 

AH bright 3 75 

Per 1C0 Feet. 
Black pipe- Iron Pipe. 

u, " 4 65 

■4 inch 3 40 

&. •' 345 

V? " 370 

3 •• 3 85 

I 4 " 5 40 

1'4 " ^ 7J 

1V4 " 9 20 

a " 12 50 

2'/, " 2400 

3 ■« 28 t0 

3'A " 36 00 

4 " 4300 

4'. '• 5C 00 

5" '• 57 CO 

6 " 7300 

alvanized pipe — 

V„ inch 5 I 5 

5/ " 5 50 

i •• ::::::::::::::: 795 

1% " 10 80 

W. " 1295 

a •• ...... 17 35 

5 11 c. off to preferred bujers. 

Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 
G C. Comet. Amer. Head. 

16 gauge 

18 to 24 gauge 4 05 3 75 .... 4 (5 

26 " 4 55 4 U0 .... 4 25 

28 " 4 50 4 25 .... 4 50 

Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 

28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 

Chain. 

Proof Coil, 3-16 in., per 1001b 

% " 7 85 8 10 

5-16 " " 4 95 5 25 

% " " 4 £5 4 60 

" 7-16 " " * 15 4 40 

i/, " " 4 00 4 25 

9-16 " " 3 90 4 15 

" % " " 3 80 4 05 

" % " " 3 85 4 10 

Halter, kenneland post chains, 40 to 40 and 

5 p.o. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie-out chains 65 p.c. 

Stallfixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, dis- 
count 35 p c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

Copper. 

Ingot Per 100 lb. 

English B?S, ton lots 16 00 

Lake Superior 

Bars. 
Cutlengthsroiind,y 2 to%in- 23 f0 25 (0 
11 round and square 

1 to 2 inches.... 23 Co 25 00 
Sheet. 
Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., 14x48 and 14x60 24 00 24 E0 

Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., irregular sizes •" -" »™ 

Tinned coppersheets ^vu 

Planished ........ ■••• 32 °° 

Braziers (In sheets.) 

4x6ft. 25 to 30 lbs. ea.. per lb 0.25 

" 35to45 " ■••• 24 

" 50-lb. and above, .... u " 

Boilerand T.K.Pitts 

Plain Tinned, per lb 28 

Spun.perlb u 3 * 

Copper Ware. 
Discount, 50 per cent. 

Brass. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge 10 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 23 

Tubing, base, per t « *»/-i 



Zinc Spelter 

Foreign, perlb I 5Vi 06 

Domestio H 

Zinc Sheet. 

5 -ewt casks 6(0 6 25 

Partcasks 06 0(6',, 

Lead. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb .. 3 50 3 7' 

Bar, 1 lb ■••■ U U5 

Sheets, 2% lbs. eq. ft., by .... 06«4 

Sheets,3to 6 lbs., " .... C6 

Note.— Cut sheets % cent per lb. extra. 
Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, lis! s 
at 7c. per lb. and 30 p.c. dis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Note. — Cut lengths, netprice, waste pipe 
J-ft. lengths lists at 7V 2 cents. 
Shot. 

Common, $6. 50 per 100 lb. ; chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb. ; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 17'/ 2 p.c. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 per cent, cash, freights equalized. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 

Discount, 60 and 10 percent, on medium and 
extra heavy, and 60 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Perlb. Perlb. 

Bar half-and-half, guarant'd .... ley. 

Bar half-and-half, commer'l 19 

Refined 18% 

Wiping 18 

Antimony. 

Cookson's, per lb 10Vi 11 

White Lead. Per 1001b. 

Ture 5 87V4 

No. 1 5 50 

No.2 5 12>/ 2 

No.3 4 75 

No.4 4 37 Vi 

Munro's Select Flake White 6 37V 2 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 6 12% 

Brandrams B B. Genuine 8 25 

" No. 1 7 50 

Above prices a- e for 25 lb. and upwards. 
Red Lead. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $4 75 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 00 

No. 1, 5601b. casks, per cwt 4 25 

No. 1, 1001b. kegs, perewt 4 50 

White Zinc. 

Extra Red Seal 06 08 

No. 1 05'/ 2 t7 

No. 2 05 06 

Dry 'White Lead. 

Pure, casks r. 5 25 

Pure, kegs 5 50 

No. l.casks SCO 

No. 1, kegs a 15 

Prepared Paints. 
In '4. Yt and 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 125 

Second qualities,per gallon 1 10 

Barn (inbbls.) 60 91 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 140 

Canada Paint Co's Pure 125 

Toronto Lead & Color Co'b Pure 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 20 
Colore in Oil. 
25 lb. tins. Standard Quality. 

Venetian Red, per lb 04', C6 

Chrome Yellow 12 14 

Golden Ochre 08 10 

French " 06 

MarineBlack 09 

ChromeGreen 10 

Freneh Imperial Greer n 12 

Sign WriUrs' Black 16 

Burnt Umber Oj] 

" Sienna 11 

Raw Umber " \\ 

" Sienna B 11 



Colors, Dry. 

Common Ochre bbls 150 130 

Yellow Ochre J.F.L.S.), bbls ... 2 uu 

Yellow Ochre | La Belle) 115 125 

Brussels Ochre 2 00 

Venetian Red (best), bbl .... 175 2 00 

English Oxides, per cwt 3 0U 3 25 

American Oxides, bbls 1 25 2 00 

Canadian Oxides, 1 bis 125 1 7"i 

Super MagnetioOxides,93p.o. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" Umber, " " 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Black, pure 09 

Chrome Yellows, pure 18 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb. 19 10 

Golden Ocbre . 04 05 

Ultramarine Blue in 28-lb.. 

boxes, per lb 06 18 

Fire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb 1 0U 

Genuine Eng. Litharge, per lb .... 07 

Mortar Color, per 100 lb 125 150 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45 lb. 18 10 

Whiting, bbl 55 60 

English Vermillion in 3l'-lb. bags. 95 

Paris Green. per lb. 

Petroleum Casks 16 3 4 

Arsenic Kegs 17 

50-lb. am lui'-lb. drums ny. 

25 lb. drums 18 

lib packages 18V4 

y 2 -lb. do 5V 

lib. tins lay. 

y 2 -ib do 2iy 2 

P O B. Montreal. Terms— 3 p. c. oft" 30 
days, or4 uios. from date of de'ivery. 
Blue Stone. 

Casks, for spraying, per lb 07 

100-lb. lots, do. per lb 98 

Pntty. 

Bulk in bbls 1 90 

Bulk in less quantity 2 05 

Bladders in bbls 2 25 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose 2 40 

Bladders in 25-lb. tins 2 35 

Bladders in 12y,-lb. tins 2 65 

Bladders in bu'k or tins less than 1001b2 90 
Varnishes. 
In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. net. 

Carriage, No. 1 150 160 

Pale Durable body 4 10 4 25 

rubbing 2 85 3 00 

Gold Size, Japan 2 85 3 00 

No. 1 Brown Japan 85 

Elastic Oak 1 .">") 

Furniture, extra 1^5 

No. 1 85 

Hard Oil Finish 165 175 

Light Oil Finish 140 160 

Demar 1 70 1 80 

Shellac, white 2 3> 2 45 

" orange 2 25 2 35 

Turpentine Brown Japan,. 1 25 

" Black Japan... 85 90 

" No. 1.. 70 7) 

Elastilite Varnish 1 gal. can, each, $3.00. 

Oranatine Flooi Finish per gal, $2.75. 

Maple Leaf Coach Enamels ; Size 1, $1 23 

Size 2, 70c. ; Size 3, 4Uc. each. 

Castor OH. 

East India, incases, per lb.. 19V, 10 

" small lots 1U 10'/ 2 

Cod Oll.Ktc. 

CodOilpergal 50 55 

PureOlive 1 20 

" Neatsfoot 90 

Glne. 

Common 08 l / 2 08 

French Medal 14 14'/, 

Cabinet sheet 12 

White, extra 18 

Gelatine 22 30 

Strip 18 

Coopers 19 

Huttner 



38 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



STEEL, PEECH & TOZER, \m 



Phoenix Special Steel Works. The Ickles, near Sheffield, England. 

Manufacturers of 



m 



Axles and Forgings of all descriptions, Billets and Spring 
Steel, Tyre, Sleigh Shoe and Machinery Steel. 



Sole Agents for Canada. 



JAMES HUTTON & CO., 



MONTREAL 



HARDWARE. 

Ammunition. 

Cartridges. 
B B Caps Dom. 50 and 5 per cent 
Rim Fire Pistol, dis. 40 p. o., Amer. 
Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5 p. o. 
Cantral Fire Pistol and Rifle, lOp.o. Amer. 
Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes Dom. 

30 per cent. 
Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 per cent. 
Central Fire, Military and Sporting, A.mer, 
add 5 p.e. to list. B. B. Caps, discpunt 40 
per cent. Amer. 
Loaded and empty Shells, Trap and 
" Dominion " grades, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 p.c. advance on list. 
Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 
Primers, Dom., 30 per cent. ; American, $1.60. 
Wads per lb. 

Best thick white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bags •■•:• 1 0" 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-lb. bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 
Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of500each, 8gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 

each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 1C gauges 70 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 110 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 
Disoount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over lu% 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 0914 

Brook's, •■•• 11% 

Angers. 
Gilmour's, discount 65 and5 p.o. offlist. 

Axes. 
Chopping A.xes 

Single bit, per doz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 1100 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 
Broad Axes, 25 percent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boy's Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, Per gross 5 75 6 00 

Best quality...... -••• — ■•"• 13 u0 15 u0 

Batb Tubs. 

7in0 6 00 

Copper, discount 15 p.c. off revised list 
Baths. 
Standard Enameled. 

5%-inch rolled rim, 1 |^ ua . 1 . ity 21 00 

Anti-Friction Metal. 

"Tandem" A Perlb. 27 

** B u ^i 

" 1111)4 

Ma?nolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 

Frictionless metal, per lb 23 

srRA.CCSE SMELTING WORKS. 

Aluminum, genuine 41 

Dynamo '.V"'.'." i2 

Mum?num;99p.o!'puVe' : 'Syracus'e''.. 45 

Phosphorine antifriction metal 1$ 

Bells. 
Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per oent. 



Cow. 
American make, discount 66% per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro' , discount 45 per oent. 
Farm. 

American, each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, perdoz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksm i ths', disoount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 60 percent. 
Standard , 60 and 10 per cen t. 
No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60 10 and 10 p.c. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 p c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen. , net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, perdoz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, pergross 2 25 5 20 

Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 12 

Bolts and Nuts. Percent. 

Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list) — 55 and 5 

" " full square (.$2.40 list) 60 and 5 

" " Norway iron ($3 list) . 60 and 5 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 55 and 5 

Plough Bolts 55and5 

Blank Bolts 60 

Bolt Ends 60 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 70 

Coach Sorews, cone point 70 

Nuts, square, all sizes. 3%c per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes 4c. per lb. off. 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c. 

Nuts, in 50 lb. lots '4c. per lb extra in less 
than 50 lb lots, %c. extra. 

Boot Calks . 

Small and medium, ball, per M — 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Briglit Wire Goods. 

Discount 62% per cent. 

Broilers . 

Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dis., 65 to 67% percent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent. 

Henis, No. 8, " 6 00 

Henis, No.9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers' Cleavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 1100 

American, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Tarred felt, per 100 lb 1 70 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, not under 4i lb. 

per rol 1 85 

Realy roofing, 3-plv, n.t under 65 lb. 

perroll 1 10 

Carpet fait, per ton 45 00 

Dry sheathing, per rol', 400 sq ft 35 

Tar sheathing, " " " 45 

Dry fibre " 55 

Tarred fibre, " " " 65 

O.K. &I.X.L., " " " 70 

Resin-sized, " " " 41 

Oiled sheatih:g, " 600 " 110 

" 400 " 70 

R 'of coating, in barrels, per gal 17 

' " small packages 25 

Refi " ed tar, per barrel 4 50 

Coal tar, " 4 i0 

Coal tar, less than ba'rels. rer gal. . . 15 

Roofing pith, per 100 lb 85 

Bull Rings. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 id. 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass net revised ist 



Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 60 per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
FaBt Joint, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cont. 
Loose Pin, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per o nt. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

C arpe t Stretchers . 

Amerioan.perdoz 100 150 

Bullard's, per doz 6 50 .... 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% percent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

No8. 31 and 32, per gross * 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 25 2 75 

English " 3 00 3 15 

Belgian " 2 50 .2 75 

Canadian hydraulic 125 150 

Chalk. 
Carpenters Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per cwt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon, per gross 14 18 

Chisels. 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Warnock's, dis. 70 percent. 
P. S. & W. Extra 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 

Churns. 
Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8— 
No. 1, $8.50— .Vo. 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00— 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames — 20c. each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, £6 
p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 54 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days. 
Clips. 
Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets Net. 

Plain York or Ontario Syphon Jet. $9 60 
Emb. York or Ontario Syphon Jet. 10 20 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Elgin orTeu. Syphon Washout 6 00 
Emb. Elgitor Teu. Syphon Washout 6 60 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonio, plain 9 60 
" " " " emb. 10 20 

Plain Richelieu 4 00 

Emb. Richelieu 4 25 

Connections 1 25 

Low Down Oot. Sy. Jet, plain 1170 

" " ' emb'd 12 30 

Closet connection 1 25 

BasinsP.O., 14in 70 

" oval, 17 x 14 in 150 

" " 19xl5in... 2 25 

Compasses, Dividers, Etc. 
American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 

Cradles, Grain . 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per cent. 
Crosscut Saw Handles. 

8. & D.,No. 3, per pair 17% 

" " 5, " 22% 

" 6, " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.c. ) 2 00 

Coil, perdoz 88 160 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 
Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per cent. 
Drills. 
Hand and Breast. 
Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 
DRILL BITS. 
Morse, dis., 37% to 40 per cent. 
Standard dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

Faucets. 
Common, cork-lined, dis. 35 per cent. 

ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) per doz. 

5 and 6-inch, common 1 20 

7-inoh 1 35 

Polished, 15o. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 45 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 



FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES AND RASPS. 
Great Western.. 7ft and 10 per cent. 



10 
10 
10 
ill 
10 
10 
10 



Arcade 70 

Kearney & Foot 70 

Die ston's 70 

American 70 

J. Barton Smith 7'> 

McClellan 70 

Eagle 70 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 6), 10 and 5 

Royal 80 

Globe 70 to 75 

Black Diamond, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 
.Towitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 
Nicholson File Co s "Simplicity" file handle, 
per gross, R5c. to $1.50. 

GLASS— Window— Box Price. 





Star 


D. Di 


amend 


Size United 


Per 


Per 


Per 


Per 


Inches. 


50 ft. 


100 ft 


50 ft. 


100 ft. 


Under 26 


2 20 


4 25 




6 25 


26 to 40 


2 40 


4 65 




6 75 


41 to 50 




5 10 




7 50 


51 to 60 




5 35 




8 50 


61 to 70 




5 75 




9 70 


71 to 80.....'. 




6 2> 




11 00 


81 to 85 




7 00 




12 55 


86 to 90 




7 75 




15 00 


91 to 95 








17 50 


96 to 100 








20 50 


101 to 105 








24 00 


1C6 to 110 








27 50 



2 40 



9 00 
14 00 

4 00 

5 20 
2 45 



dis. 



1 20 



25 



2 00 
1 50 



GAUGES 
Marking, Mortise, Etc 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, each. . . 1 65 
HALTERS. 

Rope, % per gross 

" % " 

" %to% 

Leather, 1 in., perdoz 3 87% 

" l%in., " 5 15 

Web, —perdoz 187 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis. 5 to 10 per cent. Can. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic, per doz 110 

Sledge. 

Canadian, per lb 07% 08X 

Ball Pean. 
English and Can., per lb.... 22 
HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz. net 150 

Store door, per doz 1 00 

Fork. 
C. 4 B. , dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. ist. 
Saw. 

American, perdoz 1 00 

Plane. 
American, per gross 3 15 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 40 percent. 

Cross-Cut Saws. 

Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns, 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered — 

No. 11, 5-ft.run 

No. 11%, 10-f t.run 

No. 12, 10-f t.run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 2100 

Lane's O.N. T. track, per foot. .... 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
Discount, 70 per cent. 

HATCHETS. 
Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cent. 



1 25 



3 75 






8 40 
10 80 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



39 



USE PHOSPHORINE ANTI-FRICTION METAL 



JJt is the new dis- 
ftry. Ask for 
particulars. 

It is the only 
Anti-Friction 
Metal known to be 
chemically pure. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and 811k Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nickle, etc., always In stock. 



CANADIAN WORKS, MONTREAL, P.Q. 
AMERICAN " SYRACUSE, NY. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent 
Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb.... 06% 
" " 5-in., " .... 06Vi 

" " 6-in., " .... 06 

" " 8-in., " .... 05% 

" " 10-in., " .... 05% 

Light T and strap, dis. 65 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

6 to 10 in., per 100 lbs 4 25 

12 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 25 

Per gro. pairs. 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 
Oarden, Mortar, etc., dis. 50 and lOp.o. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Disoount 45 and 5 per cent. 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 1 00 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can dis 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, discount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per cent. 

HORSE NAILS. 
"C'brand 50 and 7%p.o.off new list 1 Oval- 
"M" brand 50, 10 and 5 per cent. J head 
Countersunk . 60 peroent. 

HORSESHOES 

P.O.B. Montreal. 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 
Light, medium, and heavy... 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 60 3 85 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

F.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Ouelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 p c. off list, June 1899 
ICE PICKS. 

Star per doz 3 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.c. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lb 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.o. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Can., dis., 45 p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, Japanned and N. P. , per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz — 6 00 9 00 
Shutter, porcelain, F. & L. 

screw, per gross 130 4 00 

White door knobs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
LAMP WICKS. 
VtHscount, 60 per cent. 
■• LANTERNS. 

Cold BlaBt, per doz 7 00 

No. 3 "Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 00 

No. 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined, per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

Allglass 120 130 

8 LINES. 

Fish.pergross 105 2 50 

Chalk " 190 7 40 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 
Russel ft Erwin, per doz.... 3 00 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 



Padlock 

English and Am. perdoz 50 6 00 

Scandinavian, " .... 100 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 20 to 25 p.c 

MACHINE SCREWS. Iron and Brass. 
Flat head discount 25 p.c 
Round Head discount 20 p.o. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' perdoz 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory, per doz 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulking each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian, perdoz 5 50 6 50 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 
Discount, 25 percent. 

NAILS. 
Quotations are : Cut. Wire. 

2dand3d $3 55 $3 85 

3d 3 20 3 52 

4and5d 2 95 3 35 

6and7d 2 85 3 20 

8and9d 2 70 3 00 

10 and 1 2d 2 65 2 95 

16and20d 2 60 2 90 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 55 2 85 

Wire nails in carlots are $2.77% 

Galvanizing 2c. per lb. net extra. 

Steel Cut Nails 10c extra. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 70 and 10 p.c. 

Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 

Flour barrel nails, dis. 25 percent 

NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 185 3 50 

NAIL SETS 
Square, round, and octagon 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 CO 

POULTRY NETTING. 
2-in. Mesh, 19 w.g., dis. 6) p.c. 
2-in. Mtsh, 18 w.g. and heav er, 50 and 10 p.o. 
OAKUM. Per 100 lb. 

Navy 6 00 

U. S.Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Water White (U.S.) 16% 

Prime White (U.S.) 15% 

Water White (Can.) 15 

Prime White (Can.) 14 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oil 
can, with pump, 5 gel., 

per doz 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 125 3 50 

BrasB, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable , dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dufferin pattern pails, dis. 45 p.c. 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 percent. 
Galvanized washtubs discount 45 percent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 10 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, dip. 40 p.c. 
B, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pais, dis. 40 p.c. 
Creamer cans, dis. 40 p.c. 
PICKS. 

Perdoz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 
Porcelain head, per gross — 175 3 00 
Brass head " ... 40 1 00 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 
PLANES. 
Wood ,benoh, Canadian dis. 40 per cent. 

American dis. 50. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American 7% 
to 40 per oent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English, perdoz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 
Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

Button's imitation, per doz.. 5 00 9 00 
German, per doz 60 2 60 



PLUMBERS' BRASS GOODS. 
Standard Compression work, die. 60 p.c. 
"J.M.T." Cushion work, dis. 50 p.o. 
Fuller work, dis. 65 p.c. 
6 doz. lots an! over of the above, extra dis. 

10 p c. 
Rough Stops and Stops and Wa hers, dis. 
10 p c. With, in lots of 2 doz. and over, 
an extra dis. of 10 p.c. 
"J.M.T.'' Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 

dis 55 p.c. 
Standard Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 

dis. 60 p.c. 
"J.M.T." Radiator Valves, dis. 55 p c. 
Standard " ' dis., 60 p.c. 

Patent Quick opening Valves, dis. 65 p.c. 

and 10 p.c 
No. 1 compression bath cock, net . . 2 00 

No. 4 " " " 2 00 

No. 7, Fuller's 2 20 

No 4%, " 2 35 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

oock, hot and cold, per doz. . 15 00 
Patent Compression Cushion, bath 

cock, No. 2208 2 25 

POWDER. 
Ve'ot Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 

lOOlb.orless 85 

1,0001b. or more 80 

Net 30 days. 
PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount 22 l /j per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, perdoz 55 100 

Axle 22 33 

Screw 27 100 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 180 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 140 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 100 185 

Conductor's ' 9 00 15 00 

Tinners', solid. per set 00 72 

•' hollow pei inch 00 1 00 

RANGE BOILERS. Net. 

Galvanized, 3 > gallons $ 5 75 

Dominion, 35 w 6 75 

40 " 7 75 

Ronald's Galvanized 30 gallons 6 50 

35 " .... 7 50 
40 " .... 8 50 

Copper, 35 gallons 25 00 

" 35 " 29 00 

" 40 " 33 00 

RAKES. 
Wood, 10 per oent. 

RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Elliot's * 00 18 00 

Geo. Butler* Co.'B 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

King Cutter 12 50 50 00 

Wade & Butcher's... 3 60 10 00 

Theile & Quack's 7 00 12 00 

REGISTERS. 

Discount 40peicent 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 
Iron RivetB, black and tinned, discount 60 

and 10 per cent. 
Iron Burrs, liscount55per cent. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. oartons, %c. 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets & Burrs, 35 and 5 p.c. dis. 

and cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets 
%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
RIVET SETS 
Canadian dis. 35 to 37% percent. 
ROPE ETC. 

Sisal )2 

Pure Manilla 16 

"British" Manilla 13% 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 16 

" 5-32 inch 21 

%inch 22% 

Russia Deep Sea 15'/ 2 

Jute S 

Lath Yarn lO'/l 



RULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p,c. 

SAD IRONS. per set. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished 65 

" No. 50, nickle-plated 75 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% pe cent. 
B k A. sand, 40 and 5 per cent. 
Emery, 40 per cent. 
Garnet(Rurton's), 5 to 10 p.c. advance onlist. 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. . . 9 50 

SAWS. 
Hand Disston's, dis. 12% p.o. 
S. & D., 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's , per ft ... . 35 55 
S. & D., dis. 35 p.o. on Nos. 2 and3. 

Hack, complete, each 75 2 75 

' rame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 2 25 2 50 

Solid, " 1 75 2 00 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 23 30 

SAW SETS. 
"Lincoln'an 1 Whiting, per doz... 4 75 
Hand Sets, No. 1 Woodyatt (Morrill) 4 25 
X-cut sets, No. 3 Woodyatt (Merrill 9 50 

SCALES. 
Standard, 45 p.c. 
Champion, 55 p.c. 
Spring Balance*. 10 p.o. 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 
" Dominion, 55 p.o. 

" Richelieu, 55 p.c. 

Watren s new Standard, 45 p.c. 
" " Champion 65 p.c. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's per doz 65 100 

SCREWS 
Wood, F. H., bright and steel, 87% and lOp.c 
Wood R. H., " dis. 82% and 10 p.c. 

" F. H., brass dis. 80 and 10 p.o. 
Wood, R. H., " dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
" F.H., bronze, dis. 75 p.o. 
R.H. " 70 p.o. 

Drive Screws, 87V? and 10 percent. 

Bench , wood, per doz 3 25 4 00 

iron. ■' 4 25 5 75 

Set, Case hardened, 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, 45 per cent. 

SCYTHES. 
Per doz, net 9 0" 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 

Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS. 
Bailey Cutlery Co., full nickeled, dis. 60 p.c 
Seymour's, dis. 50 and 10 p.o. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 percent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.o. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1150 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, 1% lb., per lb 37 

21b. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, perdoz 2 40 2 55 

" Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 60. 10 and 5 p.c. 
Try and bevel, diB. 50 to 52% p.c. 
STAMPED WARE. 
Plain, dis. ,75 and 12% p.c. off revisedlist 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 50 4 00 

Plain 3 25 3 75 

Coopers', discount 45 percent. 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 



40 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PITTSBURGH, 

U. S. A. 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF" 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

CHAIN 

Proof Coil, B.B., B.B.B., Crane, Dredge Chain, Trace Chains, Cow Ties, etc. 

ALEXANDER GIBB, „„..„ *„„-..„,♦,,•,•„.. A. C. LESLIE & CO., 
Mnntmai ' -Canadian Representatives- MontreaL 



OF ALL KINDS. 



Montreal. 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 



For other Provinces. 



STOCKS AND DIES. 

American dis. 25 p.o. 

STONE. Per lb. 

Washita 28 60 

HindoBtan OB 07 

Blip 09 09 

Labrador 13 

Axe 15 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas 00 1 50 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe. per gross 3 50 5 00 

Qrind.2in,40 to 200 lb. per ton .... 25 00 

under 40 lb. " .... 28 00 

Grind, under 2 in. thick " . .._. 29 00 

STOVE PIPES. 

5 and 6 inch Per 100 lengths V 00 

7 inch " " .... 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 
No. 4— 3 dozen in case, net cash .... #4 80 
No. 6— 3 dozen in case, " .... 8 40 

TACKS BRADS, ETC. 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80 & 12'/ 2 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned 85 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 & 15 

" " tinned 80 & 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Out lacks, blued, in dozens only ..80 

" V t weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned — 

In bulk 80& 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85, 12% 4 12'/j 

" brush, blued & tinned, bulk. .70 
" gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 & 12'/ 2 

Zino tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 52% 

Trunk nails, black 65 ana 5 



Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 4 ) 

Lining tacka, in papers 10 

Lining tacks, in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" H in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin capped trunk nails 25 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tacka, papers 90 and 10 

bulk 40 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin, per doz 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather.... 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

" steel, each 80 8 00 

THERMOMETERS. 
Tin caso and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.o. 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, dis. 25 p.o. 
Game, H. & N,, P. S. & W., 65 p.o. 
G arae, steel, 72%, 75 p.c. 

TROWELS. 
Disaton a discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 18'/j 

4-piy 23% 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, " Q 27 35 

VISES. 

Wright's 13% 

Brooks 12\) 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

" No 2 5 50 

Saw ViBO 4 50 9 00 



ENAMELLED WARE 
White, Princess, Turquoise, Blueand White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.o. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 
and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 
Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per oent. off the 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and 10 per oent. net oaBh 30 
days, (n.li. factory. 
Smooth Steel Wire, is quoted at the 
following net selling prices: 

No. 6 to 8 gauge $2 90 

" 9 " 2 80 

" 10 " 2 87 

" 11 " 2 90 

" 12 " 2 95 

" 13 " 3 15 

" 14 " 3 37 

" 15 " 3 50 

*' 16 " 3 65 

Other sizes of plain wire outside of Nos. 9, 
10, 11, 12 and 13, and other varieties of 
plain wire remain at $2.80 base with 
extras as before. The prices for Nob. 9, 
to 13 include the charge of 10c. 
for oiling. Extras net per 100 lb.: 
Coppered wire, 60c— tinned wire, $2— 
oiling, 10c— special hay-bailing wire, 30c 
—spring wire, $1— best steel wire, 75c— 
bright soft drawn, 15c— in 50 and 100-lb. 
bundles net, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles net 
15c— packed in casks or cases, 15c— 
bagging or papering, 10c 
Fine Steel Wire, dis. 17% per cent. 
List of extras : In 100-lb. lots : No. 
17, $5-No.l8, $5.50— No. 19, 86 -No. 20, 
?6.65-No. 21, «7-No. 22, 87.30— No. 23, 
7.65 -No. 24, $8-No. 25, $9-No. 26 
89.50-No.27, 810-No. 28,811 No. 29. 
812— No. 30, 813— No. 31,814— No. 32 $1E. 
No. 33, 816— No. 34, 817. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nob. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31 
84— Noa. 32-34, 86. Coppered, 5c— oil 



ing, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles,15c— in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
in %-lb. hanks, 75c— in %-lb. hanks, 81— 
packed in casks orcases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c. 
Galvanized Wire, perlOOlb.— Nos. 6,7,8, $3 50 
to $3 85— No. 9, 82.85 to $3.15— No. 10 
$3.60 to $3.95— No. 11, $3.70 to $4.10- No 
12, $3 to $3.30— No. 13, 83.10 to 83.4U— 
No. 14, 84.10 to $4.50-No. 15, 84.60 to 
85.05— No. 16. $4.85 to $5.35. Bafe aizes, 
Nos. 6 to 9 $2.52% f.o.b. Cleveland. 
Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand. No. 17, 
$4.65; No. 18, $2.90; No. 19, $2.60. Hol- 
low 6 s' rand, No. 17, $ 1.30; No. 18. $2 70 
No. 19, •52.35; No 20, $2.30, f.o.b. Hamil 
ton, Toronto, Montreal. 

WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 3 00 

Gtalvanized, plain twist 3 0' 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.77% 
in less than carlots, and $2.65 in carlots 
WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Soreen, per 100 sq. ft., net. . 1 25 
WASTE COTTON. per lb. 

Colored 6 

White 8 

WRENCHES. 
Acme, 35 to 37% per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe's Genuine, dia. 20 to 25 p.c 

Towera' Engineer, each 2 00 7 00 

" S., per doz 5 80 6 00 

G. k K. 'a Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell'a Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket , per doz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian.. " ... 14 00 

Royal American., " .... 24 00 

Sampson " — 24 00 

Terma 4 months, or 3 p.c. 30 daye. 
WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 
Canadian make, discount, 40 per cent. 



ADVERTISING inWESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency. 

WINNIPEG CANADA. 



Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by all Wholesale Dealers 



DIAMOND STOVE PIPE DAMPER AND CLIP. 




rj, s. Patent June 25th, 1895. 
Canadian Pat. Dec. 13th, 1894. 

Sold by Jobbers of - - - 

HARDWARE 
TINWARE 
and STOVES, 

for furnace pipe, to support 
the sheet steel blade 



/ 



A 




Manufactured by 



THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
A. R. WOODYATT & CO., Guelph, Ontario. 



! 



CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
^ E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY 

Montreal. 

Watch our ad. in next issue, or write to us for 
particulars on our patented 

Automatic Door Strip and Weather Strip 

Specially adapted for cold climates and takes 
the place of the inner window. 

HELMS & HELMS, 148 50 wiiiow st., 

PHILADELPHIA. 



G^Wz^ 






& 



After Stock-Taking 
A New Set of Books. 

And see that your stationer given 
you . books made of "Burmese Liner. 
itedger" — a paper of excellent writing 
surface — hard and durable — good erasable 
face — distinctively adapted for blank books. 



1 



CANADA PAPER CO , Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL 




*6uil.0 fO~0AY <H€ri, 

U/ifH A figfr-1 anp 
artpve &*s£.'"' 

•DO YOl/? 

Advertisement- 
«*• in the *r» 

To^orJ-ro 

u/tfl bring you* 
tertdersfrem tht 
fast contractors 



"BAILEY" BRAND CUTLERY 



SURPASSES ALL OTHER MAXES 



WRITE FOR 
CATALOGUE. 




FULLY WARRANTED. 
Shears, Scissors, Razors, and Butcher Knives, made by 

BAILEY CUTLEEY CO. 

BRANTFORD, ONT. Limited 



CHAS. F. CLARK, President. 



JARED CHITTENDEN Treasurer. 
.ESTABLISHED 1840... 



*sr» 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices : Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results mayjustify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized 
world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited . 

OFFICES IN CANADA 

HALIFAX, N.S. HAMILTON, ONT. LONDON, ONT. 

OTTAWA. ONT. QUEBEC, QUE. ST. JOHN. N.B. 

VANCOUVER, B.C. VICTORIA, B.C. WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C. IRVING, Gen, Man, Western Canada, Toronto, JOHN A. FULTON, Gen. Man. Eastern Canada, Montreal. 




<# Australasian ^ 
Hardware and Machinery, 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
a"n"d Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 



post free to any part of the world. 

PUBLISHING OFFICES: 

Melbourne, 

Sydney, 
AMERICAN OFFICES: 

New York, 

BRITISH OFFICES: 

London, - 



Fink's Buildings. 

Post Office Chambers. 

Park Row Building. 

42 Cannon St.. E.C. 



Specimen Copies on application. 



THE TIME TO INSURE IS 



NOW 



While you are WELL, STRONG and INSURABLE. 



THE 



Confederation 
Life 

ASSOCIATION, issues policies on all approved plans 
of insurance, and is a prosperous and progressive 
Canadian Company. 

PROTECTION FOR YOUR FAMILY. 
PROFITABLE INVESTMENT FOR YOURSELF. 

Pamphlets and full information sent on application. 

Hon. Sir W. P. Howland, K.C.M.G., C.B., 

PRESIDENT. 

W. H. Beatty, Esq., W. D. Matthews, Esq,, 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

W. C. MACDONALD, J. K. MACDONALD, 



HEAD OFFICE, 



MANAGING DIRECTOR. 

TORONTO. 



:! 

l! 


!» 

il 

:: 

1 1 

if 



Gat. 1MB 




Inc. IMS 



Black Diamond File Works 

6. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve ,*>*>^^^ v Medals 




ij 

1 1 Awarded 

By JURORS at 
f International Expositions 

Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 

-* ^ *•- 




1902 




HOSE. '902 



We manufacture the most popular and 
selling lines of Garden Hose in Canada. Our "Mal- 
tese Cross" brand we confidently recommend as 
the finest Garden Hose on the market. 

We have other grades not quite so expensive, 
but good reliable brands, viz. : "Lion" (the popular 
medium-priced hose), "King" 'Sun" and "Leader." 

Our "Kinkproof" (wire wound) hose is wired 
by a special process controlled solely by ourselves, 
and is so constructed that it may be cut at any 
wind of the wire without loosening or uncoiling, 
the wire being self-gripping throughout each 
length. 



The Gutta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Co. 



OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms- 
45-47-49 West Front St. 



Factories- 



I 15-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



TORONTO, 



CANADA. 



BRITISH MANUFACTURED 

CASTOR OIL 



" II. O. M. CO." Brand. 

Cold Drawn Pharmaceutical, 
First Pressure, 
Second Pressure. 



From stock and to import. In barrels, 
and cases — 2 tins each. Special prices for 
import orders. 



B.& S.H.THOMPSON & CO 

28 St. Sulpice St., MONTREAL, 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Houseline 
Hambrollne 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Sealine 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlln 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



'RED THREAD" Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 

■ ■ Limited 

Western Ontario Representative— 

wm. b. stewart, MONTREAL, QUE. 

Tel 94. 27 Front St. Wast, TORONTO. 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal. Heating. Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JANUARY 18, 1902 



NO. 3. 




\ TRADE: J^ MARK q$ 



\ CUTLERY 



fr 



FOR SALE BV LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES. 



Lysaght's Brands 



"Queen's Head" — Best quality, best galvanizing. 
"Fleur de Lis" — Best quality, ordinary galvanizing. 
"Redcllffe" — Corrugating quality. 
"Orb" — Highest grade Corrugated Iron. 

Each the leader in its grade. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LE8LIE & CO., MONTREAL, 
BRISTOL, ENG. Managers Canadian Branch. 



<*><?! f3Q 

RETURNED 
!AN 21 1902 



Radiatoroloqy. 




That's our specialty— Radiatorology. 
It's a science — How to build a radiator that's 
easy to handle for the contractor and is a comfort- 
giver and a saver of money for the home-builder. 



^ "Safford 



99 



is all this. It's no new thing, but is recom- 
mended by a world of people who have used it, 
Write to us for a catalogue or other information, 



THE DOMINION RADIATOR CO., Limited 

Head Office, Dufferin Street 

TORONTO, CAN 



*<&&* FINE ^*^^ 



English Cutlery 



CARVERS IN CASES 
DESSERT SETS 
FISH EATERS 
CAKE KISIVES 
BREAD FORKS, Etc. 



4 # 






BRASS KETTLES 
CHAFING DISHES 
HOT-WA TER PL A TES 
BRASS INK STANDS 
PAPERWEIGHTS, Etc. 



< i : 



RIOE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



Cor. King and Victoria Streets. 



INI 



£ 3 









CPUCIBLiES 



^ 



Nos. 1 8 to 60 in stock. 



WRITE FOR PRICES. 



Samuel. Sons & Benjamin, London and Liverpool, Eng. 

M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants. 



27 Wellington St. West, 



TORONTO, ONT. 



W INllffllfIfV«MlflVVVW««««««l*«ll*a**«>*lilllllfVW«nfflVflffffVIVIIfftfffflVflVflVffVfflfflilfffnflnffVIHfifWifVff9ff||ff|f|f||i v 



3 

I 

3 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




^ Australasian *£ 
Hardware and Machinery, 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
and Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 

post free to any part of the world. 



PUBLISHING OFFICES : 

Melbourne, 
Sydney, 

AMERICAN OFFICES: 

New York, 

BRITISH OFFICES: 

London, - 



Fink's Buildings. 
- Post Office Chambers. 

Park Row Building. 



- 42 Cannon St., E.C. 
Specimen Copies on application. 



CR.Co. Star 




RED RUBBER PACKING 

FOR HIGH-GRADE WORK 



Good Packing Good Price 



Good Profits 



Good Advertising Matter 



Send for samples, prices and advertising matter. 



The Canadian Rubber Co. 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 



"YANKEE" 
RATCHET SCREW DRIVER 
-NSI5 .. 




Our "YANKEE" Tool Book 
tells all about them. Mailed 



free on application. 



No. 15. " Yankee Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 




aniiMiiime, 



No. 30 "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




No. 41. "Yankee" Automatic Drill," Eight Drill Points in Handle. 




Manufacturers also of 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chlppers. 
Fluting Machines, 

Hand Fluters. 



No. 50. "Yankee " Reciprocating Drill, for Iron, Steel, Brass, Wood, etc. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 




NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 



No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 

Screw Driver. 



Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



L 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ESTABLISHED 1750 




TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS 
ROPERIE 



LEITH 



j 1 

STEAMER 
CLOTH 



^3? AND -».! 
ffi SAIL CLOTH % 
WCOMPANYff 
% lEITH^ 

/750 



&*#**», 



Cordage 



MANILA ROPE 

SISAL ROPE 

NEW ZEALAND ROPE 

RUSSIAN ROPE 

JUTE ROPE 

FISHING LINES 

NETTING TWINES 

PARCEL TWINES 

SPUNYARNS& PACKINCS 

BAILING ROPES & CORDS 




EVERY rl nN i 

DE sCR ' OF 

& Canvas 




1750 



SAILCLOTH 

STEAMER CLOTHS 

AWNINCS 

TENT CLOTHS 

DUCK S 

PRESSING CLOTHS 

TARPAU LINGS 

CHEMICAL WATERPROOF 

SEAMING TWINES 

ROPING TWINES 



BUYERS OWN SAMPLES MATCHED AT LOWEST TRADE TERMS 



1 

edinburch 
! Waterproof, 

I "<^ 
# AND %\ 

WSA1L CLOTH %i 
i^COMPANYS 
t- LEITH g 
/I50 



ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO OUR CANADIAN OFFICE AND STORES, 

THE EDINBURGH ROPERIE & SAILCLOTH COY, Limited, 9 St. Peter Street, MONTREAL. 




No. 178. 
.25 gross; 70c. doz. 



KEYS 



The most complete stock carried 
in Canada. 

-Send for Trade Catalogue. 



If interested in Bicycle or Automobile material or Sporting Goods, 
drop us a postal and we will mail you our latest catalogue. 

JOHN MILLEN & SONS 

MONTREAL, CANADA 



Branch: 132 Bay Street, 



Toronto, Ont. 



ONTARIO 

NUTWORK 

PARIS 

ONT. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Sou a re and Hexagon. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
fishing to be represented in Canada. 



.11 . 


nff 




IS 3S SH 


Page Metal Ornamental Fence. SThat^s 

; ornameiital. very showy and surprisingly cheap. It is just what 
is wanted for door yards, division fences in town lots, grave 

PfntdTn^reta^at^nll 20 CtS - PER RUNN,NG F00T - 

.Just think of it. Let us send you full particulars. We also 
make farm fence, poultry netting, nails and staples. 

The Page Wire Fence Co., Limited, Walkerville, Ont. 8 


1 
















3 m 





















WE ARE NOT IN THE TRUST. 



Quality of our goods guaranteed and our discounts very- 



liberal. 



A trial order solicited. Write for discounts. 



s. 



99 Niagara St., TORONTO FILE CO. 

CANADIAN GOODS FOR CANADIANS. 



s. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 

<uJU ® 

UN V «02 



37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. 

Pruning Shears. 

(AMERICAN AND GERMAN) 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE 




No. 1636. 8-in. Flat Steel Spring, Black. 




No. 7191. 8^-in. Flat Steel Spring, Bow Handles. 




No. 0. 9-in. Cast Steel Blades, Japanned Handles, 
Spiral Brass Spring. 



TREE PRUNERS. 



No. 12. 8K-in. Cast Steel Blades, Japanned Handles, 
Flat Spiral Steel Spring. 



DEHORNERS. 




No. 35. Cast Steel Blades ; Length, 26-in. 
" 38. " " " 41-in. 




" Keystone." 36 in. Handles 



LONG HANDLE TREE PRUNERS. 




6, 8, 10, 12 feet long. 

H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto. 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY 



For Prices and Description see our No. |2 Catalogue. 

Graham Wire and Cut Nails are the Best. 

Factory: Dufferin Street, Toronto. 



OUR PRICES 

ARE RIGHT 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 

Manufacturers of the celebrated 



HRS&C 

BARB and PLAIN 





Canadian Office : 
6 ST. SACRAMENT ST., MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 



WRIGHT'S 

Insect 
Sprayers 

PLAIN TIN, 
LACQUERED, 
ALL BRASS. 

••BEST ON EARTH." 



Manufactured by 

E. T.WRIGHT SCO. 

HAMILTON, ONT and 
MONTREAL, QUE. 
J. li. Hanson, Agent, Montreal. 



KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32, Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 





Samples sent free on application. 

HORSE NAILS -" C." Brand Horse- Nails 

Canada Horse Nail Co. 
"BRASSITE" GOOD8 — Ounn Castor Co 

Limited, Birmingham, Eng. 






THE INDEPENDENT CORDAGE CO., Limited, 

TORONTO. 

Highest Award Pan-American Exposition 



MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 



manIla ROPE, Lath Yarn ' Shingle Yarn, Hide Cord, BINDER TWINE 

MANILA ^^^^^^^ . ^ _ _ _ 

^^^™ Pulp Cord, Clothes Lines. ^^^^^ mmmmmm ^^ 

Transmission Rope a specialty. 

I - ___ 

"There are different degrees of goodness — Good, 

Better, 
and the Best is none too good." Best, 

You won't find this quotation in Proverbs, but it is just as true. 

nil I HIM^Q "English Steel" Scythes, 
UlLLUIl O Saw Tools, Axes, etc. 

R. Dlt-L-OIM, OSHAWA, ONT. 

H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON-EJECTING. 



12 and 16 Gauges. 
Steel and Twist Barrels. 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
"Take 
Down" 
Gun Made. 




HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 

Also makers of H. & R. Revolvers, 
Catalog on request. Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 



f 



ALL STI 
TOOI 



ARE 



STEVENS 

- AR 

STANDARD FOR QUALITY. I 

Your stock is not complete without a full line of our Rifles, Shotguns, Pistols, Tools 

and Victor Bioycles. 

Handled by the Leading Jobbers. 

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p ° 2( 7 OX Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. 

A popular line of goods at popular prices charac- 
terizes our product. We only supply the best, and 
that at right prices . 

London Fence Machines, Steel Gates, 
Wire Stretchers, Wire Reels, Pliers, 
Diggers, 

and all kinds of 
FENCE WIRE. 




SECURE 

THE BEST. 




THE LONDON FENCE MACHINE CO, 



LONDON, 
CANADA. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



LUMBERMEN'S 



THE LARGEST 

STOCK 

THE BEST 

VARIETY. 



TOOLS. 



MAIL 
ORDERS 

SEND THEM TO 
US. WE MAKE 
THE PRICES TO 
YOUR LIKING. 







LOW PRICES. 

QUICK 
SHIPMENTS. 








PEAYIES, CANT HOOKS, 

PIKE POLES, SWAMP HOOKS, 

CANT HOOKS AND PIKE POLE PARTS, 

CANT DOG HANDLES, SKIDDING TONGS, 

CLEVISES, HEEL PLATES, CHAIN LINKS, ETC., ETC. 




LEWIS BROS. & CO. 



MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Our. 



MPERUL QXFOR 



Represents the very highest development attained in 
range construction. 

Its patented improved features give it precedence over 
all others — and the improvements need only to be seen to be 
appreciated. 

ITS FRONT DRAW-OUT GRATE 
DIFFUSIVE FLUE CONSTRUCTION 
OVEN THERMOMETER 
DRAW-OUT OVEN RACK 

and handsome appearance are " talking points " that 
sell it everywhere. They are leading favorites all over 
Canada. 

Are you handling them ? 

If not, write for our catalogue and price list, and 
send Spring orders now to be ready for early business. 



THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO,, Limited 




TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER 

THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL 



The Robin Hood 
Powder Company 

If you want the best Trap or Game load in 
the world, buy "Robin Hood Smokeless," 
in "Robin Hood " Shells. It is quick, safe, 
and reliable. Try it for pattern and pene- 
tration from forty to seventy yards against 
any powder on the market. We make the 
powder, we make the shells, and we load 
them. Write for our booklet, " Powder 
Facts." 

The Robin Hood Powder 
Company —> 

SWANTON, VT. 

There are twelve 
Axes that sell well 
in every dozen of 

DUNDAS 
AXES 

Wait for travel- 
lers with samples 
before placing your |Hg 
orders. 

Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont. 

W. L. HaMimand, Jr., Montreal, Agent. 




IMPROVED STEEL WIRE TRACE CHAINS. 

Every chain guaranteed. Most profitable and satisfactory chain to handle. 




Improved Quality for 1902. 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., 



LIMITED 



HAMILTON, ONT., AND MONTREAL, QUE. 



There is a great money-maker in the wall finish business, introduced 
not very many years, but now outstripping the output of all others 
put together. It is shipped to all parts of the world under the appro- 




priate name of 



MURALO 

because it has been introduced and advertised by the MURALO 
CO., peers in the art of advertising and in the making of a wall 
coating to mix with cold water only. Better, more economical, 
healthier and more beautiful than any wall finish known. Do you 
want to hear about it ? 



A. RAMSAY * SON 
J. H. ASHDOWN 
McLENNAN, MoFEELY & 



CO., 



MONTREAL 

■ WINNIPEG- Agents 
Vancouver; 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



AMERICAN SCYTHES. 



Hubbard & Blake's 
and Isaiah Blood's 



Celebrated Scythes 



PRICES NO HIGHER THAN CANADIAN-QUALITY BETTER. 



If you want them and your Jobber has not got them write to us. 



Thos. C. Collins & Sons 

301 St. James St. 

MONTREAL 

SALES AGENTS FOR CANADA. 



American Axe & Tool Co, 

253 BROADWAY, 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 



ESTABLISHED 1843. 






INCORPORATED 1893. 



t* Gurney-Tilden Co M «- 



IMITED 



Hamilton 9 



Toronto, 



Montreal, 



AGENCIES :— SAINT JOHN, N. B., VANCOUVER, B. C. 




MANUFACTURERS 
OF 



LOCKS and BUILDERS' HARDWARE 



OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION. 



Horizontal Rim Knob 
Latches, 

Horizontal Rim Night 
Latches, 

Horizontal Rim Tubular 
Night Latches, 

Horizontal Cylinder Rim 
Night Latches, 

Horizontal Rim Knob 
Locks, 



Upright Rim Knob Locks 

(Plain and Ornamental), 

Horizontal Rim Knob 
Locks, 

Horizontal Rim Dead 
Locks, 

Upright Rim Store Door 
Dead Locks, 



Upright Cylinder Rim 
Dead Locks, 

Mortise Knob Latches, 

Mortise Night Latches, 

Mortise Dead Locks, 

Mortise Store Door Lock, 



and with many styles of Door Sets, the newest designs in Bronze and 
Brass Knobs and Escutcheons 





Catalogues, Prices and Discount Sheets ^ ?g E H i s \iL ANY 



DEALER 



8 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOR THE 
STREET 



.<SM 




What 

"M&M 



THE M&M LIGm " 



FOR THE 
STORE 



Lamps 
Do. 



They give a strODger, whiter, steadier light than the electric 
arc. Operate easily, safely, satisfactorily. Save money— actual 600 
candle-power light at a cost of one-half rent an hour. Think of 
it ! Write for circulars, etc. GOOD AGENTS WANTED- Exclu- 
sive territory allowed. 

ACORN BRASS WORKS, 
Der.t. 8, 15-23 Jefferson Street CHICAGO, ILL. 



What 




Barrett Hardware Co , Joliet 111 , write : "Gasoline and sup- 
plies for "M & M" Lamps cost us $15.46 last year, an average of 
60c. a month per lamp. We believe we had as good a light as 
though we had six electric arc lights at a cost of $36J." No wonder 
that over 30.000 'M&M" I amps are in use all over the United 
States and Canada. THEY KILL Bin GAS AND ELECTRIC 
LIGHT BILLS. It will pay you to investigate. Write for circu- 
lars. AGENTS WANTED. Dept. 11, 15-23 Jefferson St., Chicago. 



See lYou Don't 
Have to Pull. 
A Child Can Do It. 




I SELF PULLER 








Walker's Self = Pulling Cork Screws 

Made of Crucible Steel, Nickel Plated, Polished Apple Wood Handles. 
EVERY ONE TESTED AND GUARANTEED. Several imitations on the market, but none as good. 

Mfrd. only by ERIE SPECIALTY CO., Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 




KEMPS Broad Hoop 

Roll Rim Milk Can Bottoms 

possess all the points which go to make perfection in Can Bottoms. 
They have been used by a criticizing public for three seasons, and 
their popularity is evidence of the satisfaction which they gave. 
The Roll Rim has no sharp turns which break the grain of the 
metal and lessen its wearing qualities. It has a broad wearing 
surface and will not damage floors. They do not cost more than an 
inferior Bottom. The IRON-CLAD TRIMMINGS are made the 
same as the broad hoop, and differ from them only in having a 
narrower and thicker hoop which does not require the 
Roll Rim. and, therefore, can be sold cheaper. For 
durability and finish our trimmings are unequalled. 

Manufactured by 

KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., 

TORONTO, CANADA. 






VOL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JANUARY 18, 1902. 



NO. 3. 



Montreal - 
Toronto 
London, Eng. 
Manchester, Eng. 
Winnipeg 



President ': 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal . 

The MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P. E. 
Island and Newfoundland, 

OFFICES, 

- 232 McGill Street. 
Telephone 1255. 

10 Front Street East. 

Telephone 2701. 

100 Fleet Street, E.C. 

W. H, Miln. 

- 18 St. Ann Street. 
H S. Ashburner. 

Western Canada Block. 
J.J. Roberts. 

Vancouver, B.C. - - Flack Block. 

J. A. Macdonald. 
Si, |cihx, N.B. - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 
NEW YORK - Room 442 New York Life Bldg. 

Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - Vis. 
Published every Saturday. 

,. ., ... [Adscript, London. 

Cable Address j Adscri ^ t ; Canada 



• WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT IN THIS PAPER 



STEEL RAIL MAKING IN CANADA. 

THE Department of Railways at Ottawa 
has been informed by Mr. F. H. 
Clergue that his company, the 
Algoma Steel Company, Sault Ste. Marie, 
Ont., will begin the making of steel rails 
next month. The capacity of the mill is 

1,000 rails a day and the materials neces- 
1 
sary for the production of 50,000 tons are 

said to be now in stock. The Algoma 
Company will not at present produce its 
own pig iron, but will obtain the greater 
part of its supplies from the Midland fur- 
nace in which Mr. Clergue is also financially 
interested. 

Mills to re roll old iron rails were started 



a number cf years ago in Toronto and 
Hamilton, but these went out of existence 
with the advent of steel rails, so that when 
the mill at Sault Ste. Marie begins opera- 
tions next month it will have the honor of 
being the first to make rails in Canada, 
either iron or steel. 

It will be remembered that in the House 
of Commons in April last the Minister of 
Railways, Hon. Mr. Blair, announced that 
his Department had placed an order with 
Mr. Clergue's company at Sault Ste. Marie 
for 25,000 tons at $32.60 per ton ex wharf 
Montreal or Levis, delivery to be made 
from June to September, 1901. A like 
quantity was to be taken during each of the 
following four years, the price to be the 
same as that ruling in the British market. 
It will be noticed that the period when the 
first 25,000 tons were to be delivered has 
elapsed and with it the price which the 
Government was to have paid for the same. 
We therefore presume that for whatever 
rails Mr. Clergue's company may supply 
the Government during the next four years 
the price paid will be that rate ruling in the 
British market. The price now ruling in 
Great Britain is 10 to 15s. a ton lower than 
a year ago. 

A press despatch from Ottawa, under 
date of January 15, says that the Govern- 
ment has made a contract with an English 
firm for the supply of 15,000 tons of steel 
rails for use on the Intercolonial, presum- 
ably on account of the inability of The 
Algoma Steel Co. to begin to fill its con- 
tract as originally intended. It is, however, 
gratifying to know that next month will see 
the mill in actual operation. 

The Dominion Iron and Steel Co., 
Sydney, began the making of steel ingots 



three weeks ago, and soon we may also 
expect to see that company turning out 
both plates and steel rails. 



HON. MR. FIELDING'S "SCOOP." 

THERE was nothing particularly clever 
about Hon. Mr. Fielding's action in 
inviting Marconi to visit Canada when 
the Anglo American Company undertook 
to force him out of Newfoundland. He, 
however, did a wise thing. And, after all, 
what is most essential in public men as in 
business men is wisdom, not cleverness. 

His action has certainly pleased the man 
who has given utility to wireless telegraphy 
and made the establishment of one or more 
stations in Canada all the more probable. 

Mr. William Smith, secretary of the Post 
Office Department, who has recently 
returned from Newfoundland, says that 
Marconi was greatly perturbed when he 
was served with the now-famous notice by 
The Anglo American Cable Co., and that 
Mr. Fielding's invitation to visit Canada 
was a great relief to him. 

Besides being a direct benefit to Marconi, 
the invitation of Mr. Fielding was indirectly 
at least a benefit to Canada itself, coupling 
as it did this country with the name of 
the great inventor, whose recent wonderful 
results in wireless telegraphy have astonished 
the world. 

Canada is benefitting from Mr. Fielding's 
action because he did the right thing at the 
right moment. Like a trained newspaper- 
man that he is, he saw there was a good 
thing in it for Canada. And by acting 
quick he got, to use a newspaper term, a 
"scoop" on his esteemed contemporary, 
the United States. He is to be congratu- 
lated. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



LOWER PRICES ON WIRE AND NAILS. 



SINCE we went to press last week a 
number of marked changes have 
taken place in prices. Not for a 
long time within the same period have so 
many taken place. 

Hardware and Metal last week said 
that the nail manufacturers had for three 
days been wrestling with the subject of 
prices, but that up to the hour of going to 
press no final result had been reached. 
Shortly after we went to press, however, it 
was decided to reduce prices 30c. per keg 
on less than car lots and 25c. per keg on 
car lots. The difference between car lots 
and less quantities is now therefore only 5c. 
per keg instead of 10c. as formerly. 

The decline is scarcely due to the con- 
dition of the iron and steel market, which is 
strong now and has been for some months. 
Two or three weeks ago, owing to compe- 
tition and a quiet market, prices declined $2 
to $3 per ton in the United States, but since 
then the market over there has assumed a 
steadier tone. In fact, at a meeting held 
only on Tuesday last, January 14, prices 
were slightly advanced. In its report of 
the meeting, The Iron Trade Review of 
January 16 said: "At a meeting of 
representatives of the independent wire 
interests of the country and the American 
Steel and Wire Co., held here Tuesday, 
January 14, a new price list was established 
and an agreement reached to hold prices 
on a basis similar to the plate, bar and 
structural steel agreements. The meeting 
was in session all day, and, upon its con- 
clusion, it was announced that prices had 
been established on a basis about equal to 
the ruling market. Wire nails, which have 
been selling on a basis of 52.05 to $2. 10 
per keg in carload lots, were fixed at $2.05 
per keg to large jobbers, J2.10 per keg to 
carload buyers and $2.20 on less than car- 
load lots." 

Trade has been quiet during the past few 
weeks, but the direct cause of the decline 
in the price of wire nails is the keen cutting 
inaugurated by two or three houses. Some 
of these reduced their figures to as low as 
$2. 50 per keg. And, although the price 
has again been made uniform, the feelings 
of some of those in the trade towards each 
other has not yet been materially softened, 
particularly as quite a quantity of nails 



were sold during the few days that the 
cutting was at its keenest. 

The discount on miscellaneous wire nails 
has been fixed at 75 per cent. 

Cut nails, in sympathy with wire nails, 
are 20c. lower on less than car lots, and 
I7^c. lower on car lots, making the quota- 
tions $2 35 and $2.27^ respectively. 

Smooth steel wire is lower, and oiled and 
annealed is no longer quoted at net figures. 
Particulars of this will be found in our 
prices current. The base price of smooth 
steel wire is now $2.60 per 100 lb. Oiling is 
10c. ; coppering, 60c, and tinning, $2 ad- 
vance. No change has been made in the 
list of fine steel wire, but the discount is 
now 22j£ per cent, instead of ij]4 per 
cent. 

Other changes in prices are as follows : 
Pressed spikes, discount 25 per cent., was 
22^ per cent. Staples, bright, $2.90 ; 
galvanized, $3.25, was $3.25 and S3. 50 
respectively. Lead pipe, discount 35 per 
cent., was 30 per cent. Shot, 22^ per 
cent., was 17^ per cent. 



HON. SYDNEY FISHER'S MISTAKE 

IN an address at Leskard, Or.t., on 
January 9, Hon. Sydney Fisher, 
Minister of Agriculture, said there 
was no Customs duty in Canada over 35 
per cent. 

Mr. Fisher is what a good many of his 
predecessors in his particular portfolio were 
not, namely, a practical farmer. And he 
has, on the whole, administered his Depart- 
ment with acceptance. But because Mr. 
Fisher is an efficient Minister, it does not 
follow that mistakes which he may make 
should go uncorrected. Indeed, the very 
fact that such can be said of him gives his 
utterances all the more weight, and makes 
it all the more necessary that they should 
be rectified when they are wrong. 

In declaring that there was no duty over 
35 percent., Hon. Mr. Fisher was wrong. 
We cannot believe that he intentionally 
said what was not true ; but as some of the 
articles on which the duty exceeds 35 per 
cent, appertain more to his Department 
than to any other in the Government, it is 
difficult to understand his digression from 
the facts. 

On canned vegetables, for example, the 
duty is much larger than 35 per cent. The 
duty is a specific one of i^c. per lb., and 
means, based on to-day's prices, a rate of 
at least 50 to 60 per cent. On jams and 



jellies the duty runs from 45 to 50 per cent, 
at the smallest calculation. Then, there is 
granulated sugar, the duty on which, 
according to the price at which importa- 
tions are being made this week in Toronto, 
approximates closely to 50 per cent; 

Then, there are some lines in thf hard- 
ware trade, such as ammunition, hinges, 
etc., on which the duty collected is a great 
deal in excess of 35 per cent, of the cost of 
the goods. 

It is not with any desire to be captious 
that we draw attention to the incorrectness 
of Mr. Fisher's remarks regarding the duty, 
but there is altogether too much recklessness 
on the part of public speakers in both poli- 
tical parties, and independent journals are 
only performing their duty when they 
expose them. 



AN INCOMPETENT BODY. 

EVERY movement Toronto makes to 
improve its municipal machinery 
appears to be abortive. When, some 
eight or nine years ago, the number of the 
wards was reduced it was hoped that the 
influence of the ward heeler would be 
weakened and that the quality of the alder- 
men would be improved. But it is only 
necessary to compare the members of the 
council of to-day with the council of ten 
years ago to prove how fallacious that effort 
has been. 

Then came the Board of Control, into 
which was to be gathered the aldermanic 
cream. But here again the expectations of 
the municipal reformers have not been 
realized. And the composition of the 
Board for 1902 furnishes the most concrete 
example of this that we have had since 
that particular piece of municipal machinery 
was created. 

To the business men of Toronto who 
concern the mselves in the affairs of the 
"Queen City,'' the Board of Control for 
1902 in a travesty on municipal government 
even as we have it to-day. And it is no 
wonder. Not one among the four is a strong 
man. And yet the power which, under the 
Act of the Legislature the members thereof 
exercise, is great. 

It is to be hoped that the glaring incom- 
petency that is concentrated in this year's 
Board of Control, and, not only in the Board- 
of Control, but in the chairmanships of the 
different standing committees of the Council, 
will awaken the business men of Toronto to 
a sense of their duty. It is a well-known 
fact that they do not now do their duty. 

The predominating influence in the muni- 
cipal politics of Toronto is the ward heeler. 
The business man is nowhere. And it is 
only because he, by his apathy, permits it. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



TRADE IN COUNTRIES OTHER THAN OUR OWN. 



TRADE OUTLOOK IN SHEFFIELD. 

THKRE is much searching of hearts 
among steel manufacturers as to 
the prospects of the new year, a 
pomt on which all seem to be in the 
dark. On account of the absence of work 
to commence with the outlook is regard 
ed as decidedly gloomy, although some 
an of opinion that the South-African 
market will shortly furnish some busi- 
ness, and all agree that the complete 
reopening of that market would give a 
valuable stimulus to trade all round and 
restore general confidence. The result of 
our inquiries points to slackness for a 
considerable time in the demand for steel 
for railway, marine, and engineering pur- 
poses, nor are there any indications of 
early improvement in the crucible-steel 
department, the depression in which has 
already lasted for two years. The bar 
iron department is likely to be less strong 
than was the case in the past year, for 
manufacturers are not hopeful of reduc- 
in the cost of raw material i\m\ 
fuel— Ironmonger, January 4. 

PLUMBERS' BRASS GOODS LOWER. 

The sharp decline in copper will, it is 
expected, cause the announcement of 
t prices on plumbers' brass goods 
after the meeting of the executive com- 
mittee of The Brass Goods Manufactur- 
• i- Association, scheduled for the 14th 
inst. A revision of prices based on 13- 

• mi copper is thought likely. The de- 
mand for brass goods, as is natural 
under the circumstances, has fallen to 
a very small volume. Buyers are not tak- 
ing anything in this line beyond what 
their immediate needs dictate. 

PRICES OF STOVES STIFFENING IN THE 
UNITED STATES. 

Recently we gave notice that an ad- 
vance of 5 per cent, in the price of 
stoves had been made in the west. This 
action stimulated the stove manufactr.r 
ers of eastern Pennsylvania to profit by 
the example set, for at a recent meeting 
an advance of 5 per cent, in the price of 
stoves, to take effect on January 1, was 
made by them. So far, no evidence has 
reached us of a similar course being pur- 
sued by the up-State manufacturers of 
New York, who have held meetings fre- 
quently at the Waldorf-Astoria in New 
York City, nor has the apathy which 
seems to have seized the body of manu- 
facturers which has hitherto met at the 
\-t.-r House been shaken off to the ex- 
tent of making an effort to adjust then- 
prices in accordance with the recent in 
creases in the cost of materials. 

Notwithstanding that the year 1901 
has been considered a good year in many 
other lines of trade, some stove manufac- 
turers are emphatically of the opinion 
that the profit derived from the manu- 
facture of stoves that have been sold in 
New York has been by no means satis- 
factory. It is also noted that the dis- 
tribution of stoves in New York City and 
vicinity has practically gone from the 
old-time stove dealer to the department 
store, the furniture dealer and the in- 
stallment house, some houses stating 
without hesitation that 75 per cent, of 
the names of buyers in New York City on 
their ledgers are of this class. The sales- 
men have also begun to remark that 
there is a scarcity of stove dealers in 
New York City. Whether the contention 



is true that New York is the dump 
ground for the surplus stove stocks from 
all sections of the country at whatever 
price can be- secured, or whether the new 
distributors are more shrewd in their buy- 
ing than the ohl-time stove dealers, is a 
problem the solution of which is often 
discussed. 

TRADE OUTLOOK IN WOLVERHAMPTON. 

Next month will prove a crucial time. 
In a few branches the future is well as- 
sured, but for the most part houses that 
start the year with enough employment 
for their hands and plants are anxiously 
awaiting the receipt of new contracts to 
replace those which are running out. The 
exceptional activity in the wagon-build- 
ing yards accounts for a considerable out- 
put of iron and steel, and this is likely 
to prove a useful standby throughout the 
The outlook as regards bridge- 
work ami other constructional material is 
also hopeful, though orders have not 
been placed so freely of late as during 
the autumn. It is recognized that United 
States and German competition will have 
to be reckoned with, but leading makers 
in this district do not fear for the result 
if they are allowed to meet their rivals 
on equal terms.— Ironmonger, January 4. 

PIG IRON IN GREAT BRITAIN. 

The pig-iron market has been dull dur- 
ing the week, and with the influence of 
the holidays still abroad, business has 
been of a comparatively unimportant 
character. In Glasgow the warrant mar- 
ket has recovered, to some extent, from 
the collapse which ensued on the an- 
nouncement of the failure of a London 
firm, but quotations are still quite 6s. 
below the level prevailing before the sen- 
sational drop referred to. It is con- 
sidered probable that business in Scorch 
warrants will show an expansion at the 
reduction, and that more activity will 
result in the market. One outcome of 
the new level of prices will, no doubt, be 
a check in the exportation of iron ironi 
Cleveland to Scotland, the difference in 
the price of Cleveland and Scotch war- 
rants having been appreciably (narrowed. 
The former have not been much affected by 
the change North of the Tweed, and re- 
main in the neighborhood of 4?»S. 
Hematites are in a rather better position 
than ordinary pig. In Barrow warrants 
are down, but makers are still asking 5b 
to 60s. for mixed numbers. The follow- 
ing is a statement of the stocks of pig 
iron in public stores :— 
Public stores stocks, in tons : Wednesday. 

Connal's at Glasgow 58, 4°° 

Connal's at Middlesbrough 139. 000 

' Connal's at Middlesbrough, hematite .... 3°° 

West Coast hematite 15,000 

N.E.R. Stores. Middlesbrough 1 400 

Since the beginning of the year the 
stock of Cleveland iron in store has been 
increased bv over 80,000 tons, while in 
Scotland and Cumberland there have been 
reductions of 12.S50 and 7.600 tons, re- 
spectively'.— Iron and Coal Trades' Re- 
view, January 3. 

NEW YORK METAL MARKET. 

TIN.— The cables from London today 
showed a further rise, of £1 10b. in tin. 
and the New York market responded 
with an advance of about 25 pom;--. 
Still there was very little business done 
here and trading in London was light, 
the upward movement in values there 



being due apparently to speculative man- 
ipulation It is intimated that the do 
tion of the metal abroad is not 
as might appeal- on the surface The 
Chinese merchants in the Kast h 
buying and piling up stocks : hence the 
lieln shipments in December. Much, it is 
claimed, flepends upon what they do with 
their holdings. If, as is feared, they 
throw them on the market, when they dis- 
cover the actual condition of the metal 
trades in Europe and the United States, 
which has grown out of the copper war, 
a heavy slump in prices may result. 
Hence in London, as here, there is little 
disposition to buy, particularly for 
future delivery. The New York market 
closed firm but quiet at 23.35c. bid and 
23.50c. asked for spot. January was 
quoted at 23.25 @ 23.50c. ; February at 
23 @ 23.30c, and March at 22.75 ® 
23.30c. The Singapore quotation was 5s. 
higher, being £103 c.i.f. London. The 
Manitou, from London, is here with 150 
tons, making the total arrivals since 
January, 1,970 tons. 

COPPER. — The lower prices have not 
appreciably stimulated consuming de- 
mand, business being still on the hand- 
to-mouth order. The market is unsettled 
with an easy tone, and while official quo- 
tations are ll£c. for Lake Superior ingot, 
11-Jc. for electrolytic and lie. for casting, 
it is reported that sales of Lake copper 
have been made at lie. The London mar- 
ket continues to decline and closed weak 
to-day at 2s. 6d. below last night's 
figures on spot and 5s. lower on futures. 
Spot was more active there than for 
several days, the reported transactions 
aggregating 400 tons. 

PIG LEAD.— The only feature of inter- 
est in this metal was the further decline 
of 2s. 6d. in the price of soft Spanish in 
London. Here the market was dull, with 
prices somewhat nominal on the basis of 
4c. for lots of 50 tons or more. The 
St. Louis market was quiet at 3.87^ @ 
3.90c. 

SPELTER— Trade continues on a 
rather small scale and the tone of the 
market is easier, spot and January being 
now quoted at 4.35c, while February de- 
livery is offered at 4.30c St. Louis was 
dull at 4.15c. No further change occurred 
in London. 

REGULDS ANTIMONY.— Prices are un- 
changed under a moderate demand at 
lO^c for Cookson's, 8Jc, for Hallett's 
and 1\ to 8c. for other brands. 

IRON AND STEEL.— There is little 
inquiry for pig iron for delivery beyond 
the next six months, and in fact, not 
much disposition to buy even nearer 
futures. Spot iron is wanted, though 
not so much as previously, but the rear- 
city of available supplies keeps business 
within narrow limits. Advices from 
Philadelphia state that those who really 
need iron and cannot get deliveries on 
their contracts with the furnaces buy 
wherever they can on the best terms 
obtainable : but even this does not ab- 
sorb any important tonnage. The lower 
prices named on steel are diverting at- 
tention from bar iron, for which it is 
being substituted. Sheets are reported to 
be dull and lower prices, it is though! 
in some quarters, may result from the 
continued lack of important demand and 

sharp outside competition. There is a 
good business in plates, however, and a 
considerable demand for structural 
shapes. 

TLNPLATE.— The market is still with 
out features of interest, trade being dull 
and buyers showing a disposition to hold 
off awaiting developments. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE SHERWIN-WILLIAMS PAINT 
AT CLEVELAND. 

THE growth of The Sherwin-Williams 
Co., the paint and varnish mak- 
ers, is an example of business pro- 
gress that is full of encouragement to all 
manufacturers who believe in the success 
of good-quality merchandise. 

For some 30 years they have held 
strictly to the principle of making and 
selling only the best goods, and in the 
face of cries for " cheap" paints, and of 
" cheap " competition they have built ouo 
of the largest and most substantial busi- 
nesses in the world. 

From a single one-storey building in 
1870 their business has grown to require 
four large plants in Cleveland, Chicago, 
Montreal and Newark, with officos and 
warehouses in 11 cities. They have '.'5 
travelling representatives on the road, 
covering the entire world. 

Within the last live years their sales 
have trippled, and there seems to be no 
let up to the splendid growth they are 
enjoying. The accompanying illustration 



ors in classics and political economy at 
Harvard, and later took a degree at Ber- 
lin. He speaks and writes French and 
German, and if you employ him I am 
sure his learning will make his services 
extremely valuable to you." 

In New York : " The bearer, Mr. Brown 
is the young fellow who took hold of 
Street & Company's Chicago branch 
when it was so run down, a few years 
ago, and built it up to a hundred thous- 
and a year. He also made a great hit as 
Jackson & Company's representative in 
London. He's a hustler, all right, and 
you'll make no mistake if you take him 
on." 

In Philadelphia : " Sir : Allow me the 
honor to introduce Mr. Rittenhouse Penn. 
His grandfather on his mother's side was 
a colonel in the Revolution, and on his 
father's side he is connected with t'wo of 
the most exclusive families in our city. 
He is related by marriage with the Phila- 
delphia lady who married Count Taug- 
enichts, and his family has always lived 
on Spruce street. If you should see fit 
to employ him, I feel certain that his 



general manager, while the first president 
is H. S. Holt, President of The Montreal 
Light, Heat and Power Co. The follow- 
ing are the board of directors : A. A. 
Allan, Toronto ; Archibald Campbell, ex- 
M.P., Toronto Junction ; Randolph Mac 
donald, contractor, Toronto ; Senator 
Peter McLaren, of Perth ; Senator D. Mc- 
Millan, of Alexandria ; John Pugsl,py, of 
Fugsley, Dingman & Co., Toronto ; Sir 
Melbourne Tait, acting Chief Justice of 
the Superior Court, Montreal ; Henry R. 
Wilson, of Wilson & Stephens, bankers. 
New York City. 

All these are well-known men, the gen- 
eral manager, D. M. Stewart, having had 
many years banking experience both in 
Canada and the United States. He was 
connected with the Bank of Commerce 
for a number of years, afterwards filling 
the post of inspector for the Royal Bank 
of Canada, in Montreal. Henry R. Wilson, 
the New York director, is a promin- 
ent banker of that great commercial cen- 
tre. In addition to him the bank will 
have there an advisory committee com 
posed of W. M. C. Lane, President of The 
Standard Trust Co., New York ; and 







Plant No. I of The Sherwin- Williams Co., Paint and Varnish Makers, at Cleveland. 

In addition to this large plant the Company has three others at Chicago, Montreal and Newark, N. J., with warehouses 
"^d offices in New York, Boston, Toronto, San Francisco, Kans ; City, Los Angeles and Minneapolis. 



shows The Sherwin-Williams Plant No. 1, 
at Cleveland. This illustration is not ex- 
aggerated in the slightest ; on the con- 
trary, it does not show the box and 
printing ana" advertising departments, 
which occupy separate buildings a short 
distance from the main plant. When it is 
considered that this illustration shows 
but one of four plants, and that the com- 
pany also controls warehouses and offices 
of its own in 10 cities, outside of Cleve- 
land, one can gather some idea of the 
extent of The Sherwin-Williams Co.'s 
business. 

Visitors to Cleveland are invited to 
call and inspect The Sherwin-Williams 
Co.'s plant and premises. 



SOME TYPES OF LETTERS OF 
INTRODUCTION. 

A gentleman who has been in a posi- 
tion to employ large numbers of educated 
young men in Boston, New York and 
Philadelphia, says he has become accus- 
tomed to three distinct types of the let- 
ter of introduction. 

In Boston : " Permit me to introduce 
Mr. Jones, who oraduated in highest hon- 



desirable social connections would render 
him of great value to you." — Atlantic 
Monthly. 

A PROPOSED NEW BANK. 

AT the last session of the Dominion 
Parliament a charter was obtain- 
ed for the establishment of a new 
bank in Canada, to be known as the 
Sovereign Bank. The scheme is backed up 
by a number of Canadian capitalists, who 
are supported by a number of prominent 
linancial men of the United States, in- 
cluding J. P. Morgan & Co., besides a 
number of others closely connected with 
The Standard Trust Co., of New York. 
The authorized capital of this institution 
is placed at $2,000,000, of which 81,000,- 
000 has already been subscribed. An 
issue of 20,000 shares, each of a par 
value of $i00, is being floated on the 
market at a premium of 25 per cent., 
which will enable the bank to commence 
business with a reserve fund of $250,000. 
The headquarters of the bank will be in 
Toronto ; the executive .offices in Mont- 
real. 

Duncan ]\1 , Stewart has been appointed 



Pane D. Cravath, of Guthrie, Cravath 
&i Henderson. This is following the cus- 
tom of other leading Canadian banks, 
who all have agencies in New York, as 
they usually have to keep a portion of 
their funds invested there. 

The foreign bankers and correspondents 
are : J. P. Morgan & Co., New York ; 
The Standard Trust Co., New York ; J. 
S. Morgan & Co., London, Eng.; and 
Morgan, Harjes & Co., Paris, France. 

The branches of the Sovereign Bank 
in Toronto and Montreal will be opened 
immediately. The site of the Toronto offi- 
ces and the date of opening, it is expect- 
ed, will be announced in a few days. 



The stock of J. C. Chouinard, general 
merchant, St. Charles, Bellechasse, Que., 
has been sold at 45 cents on the dollar. 

In conjunction with the mill of The 
Canada Wood Specialty Co., Orillia. 
Ont., there is beino- built a new veneer 
factory. Ill x 86 feet, a very substantial 
and roomy structure. It is now being 
fitted up with machinery taken from the 
old factory, and will be ready for work 
in about a week. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COM- 
PROMISES. 

A WINDING-UP order has been 
granted re The Brampton Gas 
Company, and E. R. C. Clark- 
son lias been appointed interim liqui- 
dator. 

Neil J. Gillis, general merchant, Glace 
Bay, N.S., has assigned. 

J. N. A. Carriere, general merchant. 
St. Philippe, Que., has assigned. 

J. T. Fradette, general merchant, St. 
Prime, Que., has assigned to V. E. 
Paradis. 

D. W. McClure, general merchant, Fort 
William, Ont., has assigned to Charles 
W. Jar- vis. 

L. J. Palmer, general merchant, Con- 
way Station, P.E.I., has assigned to 
Carvel 1 Bros. 

L. H. Cormier, general merchant. 
Mount Carmel, N.B., offers to compro- 
mise at 40c. on the dollar, secured. 

•J. A. Duval, hardware merchant, Mont- 
real, has assigned, and a meeting of his 
creditors was held on January 16. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND 
DISSOLVED. 

Scott & Gray, builders, MacLeod, N. 
W. T., have dissolved. 

Poisson & Co., blacksmiths, Chartier- 
viile. Que., have dissolved. 

The Vulcan Iron Works, Maisonneuve, 
Que., have dissolved and reregistered. 

Cunningham & Anderson, electricians, 
Greenwood, B.C., have dissolved. 

Jones & Anderson, general merchants. 
Wyoming, Ont., have dissolved, Willard 
. I ones continuing. 

H. C. Barnaby & Sons, general mer- 
chants, Bridgewater, N.S., have admitted 
H. S. Barnaby as partner. 

Hilliard & McKinley, builders and 
planing mill, London, Ont.. have dis 
solved. Thos. Hilliard continues. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

Heron & Youngs, general merchants, 
Embro, Out., have sold out. 

J. E. Pedlow, general merchant, Vienna, 
Ont., is advertising his business for sale. 

James H. Jackson, blacksmith, Keady, 
Ont., is advertising his business for sale. 

S. J. Reynolds, blacksmith, Stroud. 
Ont., is advertising his business for sale. 

The Manitoba Steam Laundry, Bran- 
don. Man., are advertising their business 
for sale. 

The assets of J. L. Aubert, general 
merchant, St. Eloi, Que., are to be sold 
on January 17. 

B. F. Reid, general merchant, Ayhvin. 
Que., is to have his assets sold by ten- 
der on January 17. 

The stock of H. Levasseur, general mer- 
chant, Fannystelle, Man., was advertised 
For sale by auction on January 14. 

CHANGES. 

Myrand & Cie., machinists. Descham- 
bault, Que., have registered. 

John Cober, carriagemaker, Ethel, 
Ont., is removing to Brussels. 

E. V. Demers & Co., foundrymen, 
Maisonneuve, Que., have registered. 

The Dominion Subway Co., Limited, 
Montreal, has obtained a charter. 

The T. W. Hand Fireworks Co., Hamil- 
ton. Ont.. has obtained a charter. 



Wise Preparation 



for the painting season that will soon be here, 
means a good stock of 

The Sherwin-Williams paint 

We are planning for the biggest year we have ever 
known. We believe there will be more painting done this 
year than ever before, and we mean to get our share of the 
business. We have prepared for a big season. 

If you join with us you can get the lion's share of the 
trade in your locality. We'll give you the methods and 
advertising to get it and the paint to hold it after you 
once get it. 

There's money for you in our paint agency proposition. 
If you want to investigate send for our "B-13 Booklet," 
free, but full of valuable information for wide-awake paint 
dealers. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 




CHICAGO. 
NEW YORK, 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND. 
NEWARK, BOSTON. SAN FRANCISCO. 

MONTREAL, T0R0N10, KANSAS CITY- 




Capsey & Bockers, general merchants. 
Frelighsburg, Que., have registered. 

The J. H. Ashdown Hardware Co., 
Limited, Winnipeg. have obtained a 

charter. 

The New Richmond Lumber Co., New 

Richmond. Que. has applied for a 
'barter. 

The Colonial Portland Cement Co., 
Limited, Wiarton, Ont., has obtained a 
charter. 

MacColl's Electrical Works, electrical 
supplies, etc., Ottawa, have retired from 
business: 

J. 0. Clement has registered for The 
Addressograph Co., addressing machines, 
Montreal. 

Manson Bros., general merchants, 
Wolseley, N.W.T., have sold out to I 
Curtis & Co. 

The New Ontario Builders' and ( ' n 
tractors' Supply Co., Limited, Sault Ste. 
Marie, Ont., has obtained a charter. 

The Moody, Matthew & Sons Co., 
manufacturers of agricultural imple- 
ments. Terrebonne, Que., have applied for 
a charter. 

FIRES. 

The mill of The Cleveland Sarnia Saw- 
mills Co., Limited, Sarnia, Ont... was 
slightly damaged by fire. 

The premises of Rhodes, Curry & Co., 
Limited, builders, etc., Amherst, N.S., 
were damaged by fire : insured. 

The stock of Magnan Freres. hardware 
merchants, Montreal, was partially dam 



aged by lire and water. There was some 
insurance on the stock. 

DEATHS. 

R. R. Dobell, of Dobell, Beckett & Co., 
wholesale lumber merchants. Quebec, 
Que., is dead. 



MINOR CHORDS. 

Do not "blow" about your business to 
customers. They might conclude that you 
are doing too much. 

Do net ask two prices. Your customer 
might think that the other fellow gets the 
lowest. 

Do not keep a clerk down. Your com- 
petitor might lift him up. 

Do not fail to keep your engagement with 
the travelling salesman. His time is money. 

Do not expect returns from your first 
advertisement the same day. It takes time 
for seeds to take root. 

Do not say a word in your advertisement 
that you will have to "eat." Indigestion 
is troublesome. 

Do not try to be funny in your advertise- 
ment. There's a wide divergence of 
opinion as to what constiutes fun, and the 
joke may be on you. — The Keystone. 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



INQUIRIES ABOUT CANADIAN 
GOODS. 

THE folio wing, were among the recent 
inquiries relating to Canadian trade 
received at the Canadian Govern- 
ment Office in London : 

i. Inquiry has been made for the name of a 
first-class firm of engineers and ironfounders in 
Canada who would undertake to make a patent 
grinding machine, and to represent an English 
house supplying machine tools. 

2. An important firm of soap manufacturers 
wish to enter into communication with a Canadian 
firm who would be prepared to buy their goods 
and with whom they would be ready to enter into 
an exclusive arrangement. They would prefer to 
correspond with a reliable firm having travellers 
calling upon druggists and others interested in 
high-class toilet soaps and perfumery. 

3. The same firm would also like to correspond 
with a Canadian business house in a position to 
handle household soap. 

4. A Rotterdam firm is asking for the names 
of firms in the Dominion dealing in ores of various 
kinds. 

5. A correspondent in the west of England asks 
to be furnished with particulars of the export 
timber trade of the Province of British Columbia 
with a view to opening up business relations. 



Inquiries received at the Canadian section 
of the Imperial Institute : 

6. A manufacturers' agent who is established 
both in London and Canada seeks a few additional 
agencies of Canadian manufacturers wishing to 
develop trade in the United Kingdom ; Canadian 
references furnished. 

7. A manufacturer of gelatines, glues, greases, 
etc., asks to be placed in touch with a first-class 
Canadian house prepared to handle same. 

[ The names and addresses of the 

firms making the above inquiries can be 

obtained on application to the Editor of 

Hardware and Metal ] 



THE CAR SHORTAGE. 

THIS fall and winter the shortage of 
grain cars to carry the stores >>i 
grain has been keenly felt by all 
the towns and shipping points of Mani 
loba. Excepting at competing points, 
such as Brandon, Hartney and Portage 
la Prairie, the crop has not been handled 
at all satisfactorily. But it is said that 
the C P. R. has supplied plenty of cars 
and motive power at points on the C. 
P. R. line system in the United States. 
To protest against this state of affairs 
the citizens of the town of Griswold, 
Man., anil the surrounding country, held 
an indignation meeting and resolutions 
were unanimously passed and copies oi 
these were ordered to be sent to the offi- 
cials of the C. P. R. and the Dominion 
Government. 

In these the above facts are stated and 
it is pointed out that cars are now being 
supplied, contrary to the Railway Act, to 
Oak Lake, to ship out flour equal to 
1 ,300 barrels a day. 

It is said that if cars were supplied 
there would be an average delivery of 
2,000 bushels of grain a day till spring. 

Attention is also called to the shortage 
in coal, one dealer only receiving two 
carloads since November, although he had 
contracted for one carload a week to be 
shipped from the mines. 

It is also stated that there has been no 
grain cars at Griswold elevator since 
December 14, but every day trains com 
posed of empties are passing west. 



A COOD AIM 

In manufacturing SINGLE GUNS it is a GOOD AIM to make the GOOD 
BETTER, and with that end always in view, to keep everlastingly at it. 

It is an Aim which is responsible for the universally recognized excellence of . 

Iver Johnson Single Guns. 




Semi-Hammerless. Trigger Action. Automatic Ejector or 
12 and 16 Gauge. 30 and 32 Inch Barrel. Non-Ejector. 

Send for Gun Literature. 

IVER JOHNSONS ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 

■ FITCHBURG, MASS. 



New York OHIce— 

99 Chambers Street 



WE ARE THE LARGEST MAKERS OF- 



COILED SPRING WIRE 

in Canada, our output being equal to the combined output of all other 
Canadian makers. Hence we can promise better service at no higher 
prices. You are safe in placing your orders with us. 



THE FROST WIRE FENCE CO., Limited, 



WELLAND, ONT. 



WHAT IS HE SAYING ? 




The young man is one of those up-to-date clerks. The lady has come to enquire 

about CHURCH'S COLD WATER ALABASTINE as a re- 

suit of seeing some newspaper advertising that is being done by The Alabastine 
Co., Limited, Paris, Ont. 

These enquiries come early in the Spring, about house-cleaning time, and the 
dealer who reaps the benefit is the one who has a complete and well-assorted stock. 
HOW IS YOURS? The Trade supplied by Wholesale Hardware and 

Paint Dealers. Also by The Alabastine Co., Limited, Paris, Ont. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



A Good Reputation 

A Good Past 

A Good Present 

A Good Future 

Hardware and Metal 

Montreal and Toronto 

And all over Canada 

Once a week 

Carries Lots of Advertising 

Because 

It pays Advertisers 



Hardware and Metal 
Montreal and Toronto 



BUTLER'S 



FAMOUS 



Sheffield Cutlery 



Fish and Dessert Knives ; Spoons and Forks ; 
Cabinets and Cases of Cutlery and Plate. 



<4 r»UTI FR" ^ as re ? lstered as a 



Trade Mark, A.D. 1768. 



Sole Makers of the celebrated 

"KEEN" Razors, "CAVENDISH" 

brand of Table Knives and Carvers. 



HIGHEST AWARDS. 



SPECIAL MENTION. 



—Full Line of Samples and stock at— 

George Butler & Ccs 

kSS^N>M: 62 HOLBORN VIADUCT, E.C. 

(Over Snow Hill Station.} 
MANUFACTORY : 

Trinity Works, SHEFFIELD, ENG. 



THE BATTY STOVE & HARDWARE CO 

(SUCCESSORS TO THE COPP BROS. CO., TORONTO) 
Wholesale Dealers in 

STOVES, RANGES, FURNACES, REGISTERS, MANTELS, GRATES, TILES, Etc. 

279 QUEEN ST. WEST, TORONTO. 



Handling the " NEW HOME RANGE" in 3 sizes, 6 holes, square 
high shelf, or with reservoir. 

The business will be conducted in the future by Mr. W. BATTY, 
Manager of the old firm. 

Specialty made of Stove Hardware. 



THE BATTY STOVE & HARDWARE CO, 



Will Hold Op a Sbelf! 

That's what a shelf bracket.is for. 
For this purpose there can be 

NOTHING BETTER 
NOTHING CHEAPER 

^BRADLEY STEEL SHELF BRACKET 

from the lower price at which the goods are soia. 
BO- Order director through your jobber. 
ATLAS MFO. CO.. H«w Haven. Conn.. U.S.A. 




TRADE 




MARK 



JVobles Sf Ho arc. 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 

Which can be obtained direct from the works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada. 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



APPLYING FOR INCORPORATION. 

A NUMBER of leading capitalists are 
being incorporated with a capital 
of $1,000,000 to conduct the old 
John Abell business in Toronto on a large 
scale. For nearly 50 years John Abell has 
been making machinery and shipping it 
from his fine and well equipped factory on 
Queen St., Toronto. The only need for the 
complete success of this business in the past 
was the want of money. But now the 
necessary funds to work the plant are 
forthcoming. 

Within a short time, part of the new 
organization's issue will be offered to the 
public. The English method of under- 
writing stock has been followed. The 
board of directors is to be an unusually 
strong one. Among the applicants for the 
Government charter to the new organization 
are : Hon. S. C. Wood, vice-president of 
The Toronto General Trusts Co.; Robert 
Kilgour, president of The Carter Crume 
Co.; Clarkson Jones, president of The 
Wilkinson Piough Co. ; W. R. Brock, 
president of The Canadian General Electric 
Co.; H. P. D wight, vice president of The 
Canadian General Electric Co.; W. D. 
Matthews, director of the Canadian Pacific 
Railway; Samuel Barker, M.P., Hamilton, 
and E. L. Goold, manufacturer, Brantford. 

At the present time Canadian manufac- 
turers cannot supply the demand coming 
from Manitoba and the Northwest for 
portable engines and threshing machinery, 
so the United States manufacturers are able 
to ship their goods in against a duty of 25 
per cent. They are now supplying three- 
quarters of the demand for this class of 
machinery, but, owing to the rapidly- 
increasing grain - growing area of this 
country, there is an opportunity open for 
the development of such a manufacturing in- 
dustry in Canada. 



RECEIPTS FOR REMITTANCES. 

Iron Age : The following communica- 
tion from a hardware house in New Hamp- 
shire mentions some objections to the 
practice of discontinuing sending receipts 
for remittances, as the matter is seen from 
our correspondent's standpoint : 

" We have noticed articles in The Iron 
Age on the subject of manufacturers and 
jobbers not sending receipts for remittances 
in payment of invoices, looking upon the 
indorsed check sent as receipt enough. 
How does that work when payments are 
made with bank drafts, which, of course, 
go back to the bank ? There is great effort 
made now to have all payments in that 
manner, many refusing to take private 
checks. 

"It seems to us that it is very much 



better to have a receipt. We pay, as is 
universal now, by sending statement on 
remittance blank with items, often two or 
three, and deducting cash discount and any 
overcharges or shortages. That blank we 
want back receipted, as we often want to 
look back for some reason to the statement. 
If the merchant has no receipt and the 
cashier's check is in the bank he is badly 
off. 

" We also want to know at the time 
whether parties have received the remit- 
tance and not have to wait to find out until 
perhaps two months or so afterward, when 
they send statement with notice of draft or 
a request for payment. The proposed way 
would work to the advantage of large 
manufacturers or jobbers to save expense, 
but we don't think their customers would 
like it. We should not." 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY BUILDING IN 
ONTARIO. 

TWELVE electric railway companies 
are applying for charters at the present 
session of the Ontario Legislature. 
They project the construction of not less 
than 1,046 miles of railway to be added 
to our present system. If all these lines 
are built there will be a continuous line 
from Cornwall to Windsor, excepting a 
short break from Glencoe to Tecumseh, and 
from London to Owen Sound, skirting the 
shores of Lake Huron. Many of these 
lines will open up territory not now con- 
veniently tapped by railways. 

The companies applying for incorpora- 
tion, and the routes and approximate mileage 
of their lines are shown in the table below : 

Ontario Electric Company — Miles. 

Cornwall to Toronto 266 

Ottawa to Brockville 55 

Total 321 

Hamilton Suburban Railway — 

Hamilton to Waterloo 35 

Gait to Guelph 15 

Hamilton to Guelph 26 

Total 76 

St. Thomas Street Railway Co. — 

St. Thomas to Port Stanley 8 

St. Thomas to Aylmer 11 

St. Thomas to London 14 

Total 33 

Aylmer, St. Thomas & London Electric Railway — 

Aylmer to London, via St. Thomas 25 

St. Thomas to Port Stanley 8 

Total 33 

London Railway Co. — 

London to Glencoe 30 

Delaware to Strathioy 8 

London to Ingersoll 16 

Thamesford to Brantford 40 

Brantford to Hamilton 20 

Total 114 

Sandwich, Windsor & Amherstburg Railway — 

Amherstburg to Harrow 11 

Pelette Road to Tecumseh 5 

Total 16 

Morrisburg Electric Railway — 

Morrisburg to Winchester 16 

Branch to Chesterville and Morewood 13 

Total V7777~;.: 29 



Petrolea Rapid Railway Co. — 

Sarnia to Courtright 

Corunna to Petrolea 

Petrolea to Dresden 

Dawn Centre to Florence 

Florence to Thamesville 

Branch to Brigden 

Petrolea, through Enniskillen Tp 



Total 

Goderich radial lines — 
Goderich to Dungannon . . 

Carlow to Auburn 

Auburn to Blyth 

Blyth to Walton 

Walton to Seaforth , 

Seaforth to Clinton 

Clinton to Goderich 

Blyth to Wingham 

Walton to Brussels 

Brussels to Wroxeter 

Bayfield road to Bayfield. . . 

Bayfield to Parkhill 

Parkhill to London 

Dunlop to Kincardine 

Kincardine to Tiverton 

Tiverton to Port Elgin 

Port Elgin to Southampton. 
Southampton to Wiarton. . . 
Wiarton to Owen Sound . . 
Kincardine to Walkerton . . . 



12 
15 
16 
8 
6 
6 



68 

10 
5 
6 
7 

12 

8 

12 

13 

7 

10 

9 

28 

24 

30 

8 

16 

5 

20 
16 
24 



Total 270 

Hamilton Radial Electric Railway Co. — 

Mimico to Toronto 6 

Rapid Electric Railway Co. — 

Hamilton to Port Dover 40 

Toronto & Hamilton Electric Railway — 

Toronto to Hamilton 40 



THE TAX ON MACHINERY. 

At a meeting of the Montreal Executive of 
the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, 
held on January 9, the machinery tax was 
taken up, and a committee was appointed 
to interview the assessors concerning its 
enforcement in a uniform way. A resolution 
was passed as follows : 

That the various candidates for municipal honors 
be requested to define their position in the matter 
of abrogating the machinery tax, which, in the 
opinion of this association, is detrimental to the 
interests not only of the manufacturers, but of 
Montreal as a manufacturing city, inasmuch as it is 
driving important industries from the city and 
building up suburban districts at Montreal's 
expense. 

Joseph Adelard Duval, hardware mer- 
chant, 1313 St. Catherine street, Montreal, 
has made an assignment at the instance of 
Henri La Belle. His principal creditors 
are The Sherwin-Williams Co., $446; 
Caverhill, Learmont & Co., $429 ; Seybold, 
Son & Co, $223, and Henri Li Belle, $228. 

WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 
WIRE^ 

Prompt Shipment. 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



1 TRADE BETWEEN CANADA AND THE WEST INDIES. 1 

i I 

3 Some Things That Are Being Done to Encourage It. 



A CHAT WITH MR. PICKFORD. 

1HAD a brief chat with Mr. Charles 
Pickford, of Pickford & Black, be- 
fore he left Toronto for Halifax en 
route to the British West Indies. As the 
readers of " The Canadian Grocer " arc 
well aware, Mr. Pickford has spent about 
five months in Western Ontario, with he, id 
quarters in Toronto, working up business 
on British West-Indian account. In reply 
to an inquiry of mine as to the result of 
his elTorts, he said : 

ONTARIO PEOPLE WAKING UP. 

" The people of Ontario are waking up 
to the importance of the West-Indian 
trade, but the car-shortage has been play- 
ing the mischief with us. 1 have in my 
mind at the moment one man who is 
shipping flour to the West Indies by way 
of New York simply because he cannot 
get ears to ship it by way of Halifax. 

" The people here seem anxious to know 
what is going on and the possibilities of 
trade with the West Indies. Some of 
them, however, tell me that they have 
got so much business on hand for the 
home market that they cannot attend to 
foreign business. One manufacturer to 
whom I, in the autumn of 1900, gave the 
names of some West-Indian firms, has be- 
gun to work tip an extensive business, 
but he has been compelled to send a good 
deal by way of New York on account of 
being unable to get cars enough to ship 
by way of a Canadian port. This par- 
ticular shipper has been sending split 
peas, bran, oats, and flour." 

" Do you think the outlook for trade 
between Western Canada and the West 
Indies is improving ? 

A SHORTAGE OF CARS. 

" Yes ; 1 am certain it is," declared 
Mr. Pickford, with some emphasis. "Had 
it not been for this car-shortage I am 
sure we would have had a big business 
out of Ontario during the last few 
months. There is one thing, however, 1 
fear, and that is that we Canadians are 
rather slow in reaching out after this 
West-Indian trade. What I mean is we 
are 

NOT KEEN ENOUGH AFTER NEW 
BUSINESS. 

Many of us are too easily satisfied with 
home business and not energetic enough 
in reaching out after foreign trade. I am 
in hope that the trip of the representa- 
tives of The Canadian Manufacturers' 
Association to the West Indies will be 
productive of good results. We will ar- 
range to see that they get into touch 
with good houses in the West Indies." 

CLASS OF CANADIAN GOODS WANTED. 

" In what, lines do you think it is likelv 
we can most expand our export trade 
with the West Indies?" 
• " There is no reason why the boot and 
sh..< men should not walk in there and 
get a good business. Then there are can- 



ned goods, biscuits, ready-made clothing 
— a good deal of which is now coming 
from the Old Country. There are also con- 
densed milk, butter, cheese, agricultural 
implements, carriages, harness. In fact, 
a market can be found in the West Indies 
for nearly everything we manufacture. 
Samples of the agricultural implements 
used in the West Indies are on exhibit in 
the Toronto Board of Trade building. 
They will show Canadian manufacturers 
what are wanted in that line." 

EXPORT TRADE OF WEST INDIES TO 
CANADA. 

" What about the export trade from 
the West Indies to Canada ? " 

" It is growing. Our steamers are 
bringing more merchandise from the West 
Indies to Canada than ever before. The 
Bendict brought 3,000 tons of Demerara 
sugar and the Oruro 1,000 tons quite 
recently." 

" Your steamers, how often is it they 
run to the West Indies ? " 

" A steamer leaves St. John and Hali- 
fax fortnightly for Bermuda, St. Lucia. 
Barbados, Trinidad and Demerara. Every 
month a steamer leaves St. John and 
Halifax for St. Kitt's, Antigua, Mont- 
serrat, Dominica, St. Vincent, Grenada, 
Tobago, Bermuda, St. Lucia, Barbados, 
Trinidad and Demerara. On the 15th of 
each month a steamer also leaves Hali- 
fax for Kingston, Jamaica, calling at 
Bermuda and Turk's Island, both going 
and coming." 

AN ENTHUSIAST. 

Aside altogether from his position of 
representative of Pickford & Black, Mr. 
Charles Pickford is an enthusiast in re- 
gard to trade between Canada and the 
West Indies, and during his stay in West- 
ern Ontario preached its advantages and 
possibilities wherever occasion offered. 
During the next five or six months he 
will reside in the West Indies, and he was 
due to leave for there on the 13th inst. 
Before leaving Toronto he told me he 
would be only too glad to try and sup- 
ply information regarding West -Indian 
trade matters to anyone seeking it. Dur- 
ing his residence in the West Indies his 
headquarters will be in Barbados, and 
any communication addressed to him in 
care of Da Costa & Co.. Barbados, will 
reach him. 

OMAR. 

JAMAICA SERVICE VIA ST. JOHN.N.B. 

A MEETING of the Board of Trade, 
St. John. N.B., was held on the 
10th inst., chiefly to consider 
West-Indian trade matters. 

Mr. Robert Munro, Montreal, President 
of The Canadian Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion, who leaves for the West Indies on 
the 27th inst., was present. He was 
pleased to learn of the proposed Jamaican 
service and referred at length to the 
situation in the West Indies. The trans- 
portation companies were not solely to 
blame for the lack of development of this 



trade. Canadian manufacturers and mer- 
chants 

MUST SELL THEIR OWN G^ODS 

in the West-Indian market and not de- 
pend upon the transportation companies 
to sell for them. Something must lie 
done for the West-Indian sugar trade and 
the Canadian merchants should press [or 
preferential trade under the fiscal ar- 
rangements of all British dependencies. 
Canada was leading the way for this and 
should suggest that she receive similar 
treatment on the part of other colonies. 
He told of the object of his approach iie 
visit to the West Indies and urged that 
a representative of maritime manufactur- 
ers shotdd accompany him. If so, he 
thought the chance of success of the mis- 
sion would be considerably increased. 

D. W. Marsh, of Toronto, was next 
called upon to tell the meeting some- 
thing of the plans of The Canada- 
Jamaica Steamship Co., for the service 
between St. John and Jamaica. He said 
he did not expect to have to address a 
meeting so soon. 

HIS MISSION 

was to find out what goods New Bruns- 
wick could send to Jamaica and what 
amount of trade could be worked up. He 
assured the meeting that the company 
would do all in its power to develop 
business between Canada and Jamaica. 
Though the original plan was to run 
only between Canada and Jamaica, and 
this would be carried out — yet, if the 
trade warranted it, arrangements would 
be made at Jamaica to connect with 
other islands. 

THE JAMAICAN TRADE 

was a most important one and courted 
development. He paid some attention to 
the position Jamaica occupies among the 
other islands. It was the most import- 
and of all the British islands. It does 
ten times as much business as the other 
islands, is of much greater area than any 
of them, and the proportion of whites in 
its population is much larger. He had 
paid much attention to Western Canada 
and could say that the feeling there is 
that a large business could be worked 
up. 

Speaking of the articles Canada could 
supply to Jamaica, he mentioned that 
there was a large demand for flour, oats, 
and potatoes. The flour would come from 
the west, but the oats and potatoes 
would be principally supplied by the 
Maritime Provinces. Jamaica imports 
annually 

600,000 BARRELS OF FLOUR 

and of this vast quantity only a few 
thousands barrels are sent by Canada. 
'fhe supply is not steady, and conse- 
quently there is great opportunity for a 
profitable trade. The Canadian millers 
have recently been put in communication 
with Jamaica, and he expected more Can- 
adian flour would, in the future, find its 
way there. 

Fish, he characterized as one of the 
largest of Jamaican imports, and he be- 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



lieved Canadian fish could he delivered at 
Jamaica very profitably if transported 
quickly on a steamer making no interme- 
diate stops. The vessels between St. 
John and Jamaica would have to pass 
through heated waters, and if the vessel 
was forced to stop while in these waters 
the resulting depreciation in value of the 
cargo would be considerable, as the heat 
would obtain access to the cargo, and 
the vessels' ventilating apparatus would 
be of practically no value, unless she 
were in motion. 

The Canada-Jamaica Steamship Co. 
would devote much effort to the importa- 
tion of fruit, including bananas, oranges, 
cocoanuts, etc., and would make a fea- 
ture of the ports on the south shore of 
the islands. This shore embraced a large 
fruit-growing country, and hitherto the 
steamship facilities for getting out this 
fruit were not of the best. If the proper 
facilities could be found here, the com- 
pany would bring in some fruit. 

CANADIAN GOODS JAMAICA WOULD TAKE. 

W. E. L. Marsh, also of Toronto, de- 
voted his attention first to the class of 
products Jamaica would take from the 
Dominion, and in this connection men- 
tioned framed boards and lumber, whi' h 
would find a ready sale there. High-class 
butter, nicely put up, was also in large 
demand, but it would require good trans- 
portation facilities to develop a trade, 
as no large stock of butter could be laid 
in. Owing to the heat, it was necessary 
to place the butter on the market b\ 
every steamer. Cheese of good quality 
and a superior class of meats would also 
find a market. The island imported large 
quantities of condensed milk, most of 
which was at present furnished by Den- 
mark or Michigan, but he thought a good 
Canadian article could supplant them. 
The inward cargo would include bananas, 
oranges, limes and pineapples, and a 
good trade should be developed as time 
goes on. 

W. S. Fisher asked what the length of 
passage would be, how many days would 
be consumed on the voyage, and what 
the steamers' facilities woidd be for per- 
ishable products ? 

THE BOATS. 

In reply, D. W. Marsh said the Ask, 
which would be the first boat, would 
have a speed of 10 knots, and would make 
the trip from St. John to Jamaica in 
7£ days. The boats were thoroughly 
equipped for carrying fruit. The Ask 
could be obtained only until March, when 
it will be under charter to The United 
Fruit Co. The fruit company's steamers 
were used only for carrying bananas 
from Jamaica to the United States, and 
took no cargo back to the islands. 

The Banta was a new steamer and the 
conditions under which she was chartered 
specified that she should have good facil- 
ities for carrying perishable articles in 
good condition. If the dairy product or 
meat trade develops, a cold-storage equip- 
ment will be provided. The facilities 
needed here include possibly a heated 
warehouse, and the steamship company 
relied on the assistance of the St. John 
merchants to make the business a suc- 
cess. On their part, the steamship com- 
pany would agree to make the service 
meet the demands. 

W. Frank Hatheway asked what facili- 
ties the boats possessed for passenger 
traffic ? 

NOT PASSENGER BOATS. 

Air Marsh replied that the company 



would not make a feature of passenger 
service at present. The capacity of the 
boats was limited to four or six passen- 
gers. 

E. A. Goodwin asked for information 
as to the freight rates on oranges, pine- 
apples and other fruits. 

Mr. Marsh replied that the company 
would secure the fruit on the island and 
lay it down in St. John on the same 
plan as pursued by other fruit companies. 
The cost would, of course, depend on the 
trade. While the steamer had regular 
ports of call, yet the timetable permitted 
her to call at any port on the island. 
The company now has arrangements with 
the C.P.R. to give through bills of lading 
to all places on that line, and doubtless 
similar arrangements could be made with 
the I.C.R. 

Geo. Robertson referred to the manner 
in which The Elder-Dempster Steamship 
Co. was developing the fruit trade in 
Great Britain. He felt there was business 
in the proposed line, and would be de- 
lighted if a profitable trade could be 
worked up without a subsidy. 

Col. Tucker, M.P., assured the company 
they would have his best efforts for for- 
warding any scheme for the development 
of Canadian trade. 

Mayor Daniel, in a brief speech, wel 
corned Messrs. Marsh and Munro to St. 
John. 

Superintendent Osborne, of the O.P.R., 
referred to the success of the winter-port 
business as a good criterion from which 
to judge the outlook for West-Indian 
trade. It showed St. John merchants 
had enterprise and they would doubtless 
provide large cargoes for the new line. 

F. L. Potts, J. N. Sutherland, Colonel 
Tucker, John Sealy and others also 
spoke on the future of the line. 

CANADIAN PAINT IN THE WEST 
INDIES. 

OUR readers will remember that 
some two months and a half 
ago we mentioned in The Mer- 
chant that Mr. W. S. Fallis, of The Sher- 
win-Williams Co., paint and varnish 
makers, had sailed on a voyage of trade 
discovery to the British West-Indian 
Islands. Mr. Fallis has, for two years, 
had charge of The Sherwin-Williams' in- 
terests throughout the Maritime Pro- 
vinces, and his selection as an ambassa- 
dor of the firm in the colonies to the 
south, was a fitting tribute to the suc- 
cess which has crowned his efforts since 
enlisting in the services of the company. 
He sailed from Halifax by the Erna, of 
The Pickford & Black line, on September 
23, and calling at Bermuda, St. Lucia, 
Barbados and Trinidad, arrived in Demo- 
rara on October 7. At Demerara he re- 
mained three days and was successful in 
opening accounts with several of the 
most prominent importers. He found the 
opportunity for trade by no means dis- 
couraging despite the fact that the peo- 
ple have been for centuries handling 
English paints almost exclusively. Pre- 
pared paints have been practically an 
unknown quantity in all of the West- 
Indian markets up to the present time, 
but Mr. Fallis expressed the opinion that 
the same measures which have been taken 
by his company to introduce The Sher- 
win-Williams paints throughout Canada, 
would eventually secure satisfactory re- 
sults in the various markets visited. He 
opened accounts at Demerara, Trinidad. 
Barbados and St. Lucia and reports the 



outlook for future business most promis- 
ing. Trinidad, to his mind, is the market 
which seems to indicate the greatest pos- 
sibilities, as the natural resources of the 
Island are rich and varied. While there, 
he appointed as agent, T. Geddes Grant, 
a former Nova Scotian, who is doing all 
that he can to encourage more tradt with 
Canada. Mr. Fallis expressed himself as 
surprised that a more general effort has 
not been made by Canadian manufactur- 
ers to capture West-Indian trade. At all 
the ports visited he saw thousands of 
packages of freight being landed from 
New York, the bulk of it similar in char- 
acter to what is produced in Canada. He 
found the people very hospitable and dis- 
posed to listen to what he had to say. 
but New York has such a hold that it 
will require a strong and continuous effort 
on the part of Canadian exporters to 
break it. Mr. Fallis named a number of 
Canadian-manufactured articles which he 
felt sure could be marketed in the West 
Indies at a considerable profit. He thinks 
that, with the present steamship connec- 
tion from Canada, our people are losing 
a great opportunity if they do not go out 
and see what the trade possibilities are. 
— The Maritime Merchant. 



TO VISIT THE WEST INDIES. 

A change has been made in the person- 
nel of the representatives of The Can- 
adian Manufacturers' Association, who 
leave on the 27th inst. for the West 
Indies. Mr. Robert Munro, the President, 
will go, as originally intended, but Mr. 
E. M. Wilcox, Assistant Secretary, havint 
resigned to take a position with The 
Robert Simpson Co., will have to give 
place to another, and the choice has 
fallen on Mr. J. F. N. Stewart. The de- 
putation will visit Bermuda, St. Kitt's, 
Antigua, Montserrat, Dominica, St. 
Lucia, Barbados, St. Vincent, Grenada, 
Tobago, Trinidad, and Demerara, then 
returning by the Island of Jamaica. 



It is reported from Trail, B.C., that 
The Canadian Smelting Works will imme- 
diately set about the construction of a 
refinery at that place. The plant will 
have a capacity sufficient to handle the 
present bullion output of that country, 
and, although it will be to a certain ex- 
tent experimental, it will be extended and 
enlarged as soon as it was shown that 
sufficient bullion can be secured to insure 
its commercial success. 

At the next session of the Legislative 
Assembly of Manitoba an application will 
be made for the passing of an Act incor- 
porating The Winnipeg River Power Co., 
Limited, with power to develop water 
powers oil or near the Winnipeg river in 
the Province of Manitoba, to generate 
electricity therefrom, to carry on the busi- 
ness of furnishing electric and other light 
and heat, to construct and operate a line 
or lines of electric railway between a 
point at or near the city of Winnipeg and 
the town of West Selkirk, and between 
Winnipeg and some point or points on 
the Winnipeg river either via Selkirk or 
otherwise, or between intermediate points; 
to construct a line or lines of pipes from 
(he Winnipeg river to or in the city of 
Winnipeg or such other point or points as 
may be determined for the purpose of 
supplying water, to acquire all necessary 
lands, water powers and privileges, to 
erect all necessary dams, works and ways, 
and generally for such other powers aa 
may be necessary or convenient to or for 
such a company.. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



John Bowman 

HARDWARE & COAL CO. 

LONDON, ONT. 



SKATES SKATES SKATES 

We have a large stock of Skates to dispose of 
and will fill all orders promptly at closest prices. 

Cutlery Cutlery Cutlery 



Special Lines 



Special Prices 



English and German Table and Pocket 
Cutlery, Cases, Carvers, Razors, Scis- 
sors, Pen and Pocket and Table Cutlery 
in great variety. 



Special Pric 



After Stock-Taking 

You will be replenishing your stock, so we wish 
to keep before your notice, "Dominion" Goods, all of which 
bear the following Trade Mark, which is a guarantee of quality: 



^fes&fe 



SHELF 
GOODS 




HEAVY 
GOODS 



Wood Screws, 

Wire Nails, (Papers), 
Bright Wire Goods, 

Wire Door Pulls, 
Steel and Brass Jack Chain, 
"Crescent" Wire Coat 

and Hat Hooks. 



Wire Nails, 
Iron and Steel, 
Brass and Copper, 
Hay Baling, 
Pulp Binding, 
Galvanized, 
Barbed. 



W 
I 

R 
E 



I Bright and Galvanized 
Fence. 



Bed, Blind, ] 

anCP.ultr, STAPLES 

Netting. J 

BROOM, MATTRESS, BOTTLING, 
and other wires. 

Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co. 



MONTREAL 



Limited 



TORONTO 



ESTABLISHED I860. 



NCORPORATED 1895. 



STTGr-^IR MAKEES' SUPPLIES 



"IMPERIAL" 



Steel 

Sap 

Spouts 



Improved 1902 Pattern, Tapered 

Specially adapted for Covered Sap Buckets. 



"EUREKA" 



Steel Sap Spouts 




Size 
Of 

Spouts 



THE "EUREKA" STEEL SAP SPOUTS 

ARE EVER POPULAR 

C Economical and Durable. 
I Safe and Secure — No Leakage. 
BECAUSE THEY ARE: l Easily Inserted— Do not injure the tree. 

\ Secure Full Flow of Sap. 

All packed in cardboard boxes, 100 each. 

We carry full stock of all lines. Write for prices. 
Orders by letter or wire promptly shipped. 

THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL, 



MAPLE STRUP CANS 

"LfllH UMM" ^ 



ROUND— With Screw Tops 
and Strap Handles. 

SQUARE-With ScrewTops 
"and Wire Handles. 

Plain or Lithographed. 

capacity : 

1 Qt. Wine Measure. 
1 Qt. Imperial Measure. 
% Gall. Wine Measure. 
% Gall. Impl. Measure. 
1 Gall. Wine Measure. 
1 Gall. Impl. Measure. 

Special design made up, if suf- 
ficient quantities are wanted. 



Sap 
Buckets 



Long Pattern 

Nos. 7 8 12 It. 
Quarts 16 8 12 

Western Pattern 

tj and ID Quarts, 




20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, January 17. 1902. 
HARDWARE. 

TRADE is better this week and more 
travellers are on the road, work- 
ing especially on import goods. 
Buying for spring commences with an en- 
couraging number of orders, and pro- 
spects for the coming year are bright. 
A number of changes are noted this week. 
The list on Stanley rules has been 
altered and the new one published gives 
a discount of 55 per cent. A few prices 
on Stanley planes have also been chan- 
ged. Reductions have been made in wire 
nails, cut nails, fence staples and smooth 
steel wire. 

BARB WIRE — Though the market is 
rather quiet, quite a number of orders 
have been booked for spring delivery. 
We quote $3 per 100 lb. f.o.b. Montreal. 

GALVANIZED WIRE — * There is only 
a light movement. We quote as fol- 
lows: Nos. 6, 7 and 8 gauge, $3.45; No. 9, 
$2.80; No. 10. 83.55; No. 11, $3.65 ; No. 
12, $2.95 , No. 13, $3.05 ; No. 14, $4.05 : 
No. 15. $4.55 ; No. 16, $4.80 ; No. 17, 
$5.20 ; No. 18, $5.45. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE - Business is 
better this week. There have been chan- 
ges all round. Bright iron and annealed 
is on a $2.60 base for to 9 gauge. 



Extras are as follows : No. 10, 6c. in- 
stead of 7c; No. 11, 12c. instead of lie; 
No. 12, 20c, the same ; No. 13, 30c. in- 
stead of 35c; No. 14, 40c instead of 
47c; No. 15, 55c. instead ot 60c; No. 
16, 70c instead of 75c. We quote per 100 
tb. f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London. St. John, and Halifax. 

EINE WIRE — There is still only a 
small business doing. The discount has 
been altered from 17£ per cent, to 22£ 
per cent. 

SPRING WIRE — This is $1.25 extra, 
in place of $1. 

COPPERED AND TINNED WIRE — 

Coppered, extra, is 60c; tinned, $2 per 
100 ft. 

BRASS AND COPPER WIRE - The 

demand is a small one. On both wires 
the discount has been changed from 55 
and 2£ per cent, to 60 per cent. off. 

PENCE STAPLES — A little better 
movement prevails. We quote per 100-tb. 
keg, $2.90 for bright, a reduction of 35c, 
and $3.25 for galvanized, a reduction of 
50 cents. 

WIRE NAILS t- A reduction has taken 
place of 30c for small lots and 21\c. for 
carlots. Under the new prices business 
has improved considerably. We quote : 
$2.55 for small lots and '$2.50 for car- 
lots f.o.b. Montreal, London, Hamilton, 



Toronto. Gananoque, Brantford, Windsor, 
Out., St. .John and Halifax. 

CUT NAILS — Trade is picking up. 
Reductions are 20c for small lots and 
17£c for carlots. Discounts on all are 
now 40 per cent, instead of 25 per cent. 
and 30 per cent. We quote $2.35 per keg 
for small lots and $2.27^ for carlots. 
Flour-barrel nails, 40 per cent, discount ; 
coopers' nails, 40 per cent, discount. 

HORSE, NAILS — There is not much 
demand. " C " brand is 50 and 7? T per 
cent, oft' and " M " brand at 60 per cent, 
oft* on oval and new city heads, and 66 
2-3 per cent, off new countersunk heads. 

HORSESHOES — The market continues 
inactive. We quote as follows : Iron 
shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 2 and 
larger, $3.50; No. 1 and smaller, $3.75; 
snow shoes, No. 2 and larger, $3.75 ; No. 
1 and smaller, $4 ; X L steel shoes, all 
sizes, 1 to 5, No. 2 and larger, $3.60 ; 
No. 1 and smaller, $3.85 ; feather-weight, 
all sizes, $4.85 ; toe weight, steel shoes, 
ull sizes, $5.95 f.o.b. Montreal ; f.o.b. 
Hamilton, London and Guelph, 10c. 
extra. 

SCREWS — There is a light demand. 
Prices are the same. The discounts are 
as follows : Flat head bright, 87-J- and 
10 per cent. off list; round head 
bright, 82£ and 10 per cent.; flat head 
brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round head 
brass, 75 and 10 per cent. 



cREAriERv Cans and Trimmings 











CREAMERY CANS. CREAMERY TAPS. " F ^ca S 

With Locking With Steel Rotlnnod Loose Key rAlirp 

Attachment Cover. Slip Cover. Tap. Metal Tap. UAUUfc. 

As we carry a complete stock at all times of the above lines prompt shipment can always be made. 
A heavy stock of Sheet Tin of all sizes, gauges and quality always on hand. 

* McClary Manufacturing Co., 

TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, AND ST. JOHN, N.B. 

" Everything for the Tinshop." 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



THE PAGE-HERSEY 

IRON & TUBE GO. 



-Limited 



Montreal 



Manufacturers of 



J 



Wrought Iron Pipe 

For Water, Gas, Steam, Oil, 
Ammonia and Machinery. 



DRAIN PIPES, 
PORTLAND CEMENTS, 
FIRE BRICKS AND CLAY 
SILICA AND MAGNESIA 
BRICKS, 

with specially prepared mortar. 

Contractors' and Founders' 
Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 




Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

« CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO. ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND "DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
s required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



BOLTS — There is a fair movement at 
unchanged prices. These arc : Norway 
carriage bolts, 60 and 5 per cent.'; 
common, 55 and 5 per cent.; full square 
carriage bolts, 60 and 5 per cent.; 
machine bolts, 55 and 5 per cent. ; coach 
screws, 70 per cent. ; sleigh shoe bolts. 
70 per cent. ; blank bolts, 60 per cent. ; 
bolt ends, 60 per cent. ; plough bolts. 55 
and 5 per cent. ; tire bolts, 67A per cent.; 
stove bolts, 67£ per cent. To any retail- 
er an extra discount of 5 per cent, is 
allowed. Nuts, square, 3fc. per lb. oil 
list ; hexagon nuts, 4c. per tb. off list. 
To all retailers an extra discount of £e. 
per 11). is allowed. 

BUILDING PAPER — The demand for 
building paper is slightly better, but the 
movement is still small. We quote : Tar- 
red felt, §1.70 per 100 lb.; 2-ply, 
ready roofing, 85c. per roll; 3-ply, 11.1(1 
per roll ; carpet felt, $2.25 per 100 lb.; 
dry sheathing, 35c. per roll ; tar sheath- 
ing, 45c. per roll ; dry fibre, 55c. per roll; 
tarred fibre, 65c. per roll ; O.K. and I.X. 
L., 70c. per roll ; heavy straw sheathing. 
$30 per ton ; slaters' felt, 60c. per roll. 

CORDAGE — The demand. though 
small, shows some improvement. Manila 
has advanced to 16c, £c. higher than 
last week. Prices on all lines of cordage 
are quite firm. Our quotations are 
as follows : Manila, 16c; British 
Manila at I3^c; sisal, 12c. and lathyarn 
at I0£c. Manitoba prices are : Manila, 
16c.; British Manila, 14^c; sisal, 13c. anil 
lathyarn, 12c. 

RIVETS AND BURRS — The demand 
is very light. No changes have occurred. 
The discounts are as follows : Best 
iron rivets, section, carriage. and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., coop- 
ers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 60 and 
10 per cent. ; swedes iron burrs are 
quoted at 55 per cent, off ; copper rivets, 
35 and 5 per cent, off, and coppered iron 
rivets and burrs, in 5-tb. carton boxes, 
are quoted at 60 and 10 per cent, off 
list. 

SCREEN WIRE CLOTH — There is a 
better trade doing this week. Price's arc 
steady at $1.25 per 100 square feet. 

POULTRY NETTING - Orders for 
spring delivery are coming in satisfactor- 
ily, and trade is in a healthier condition. 
Canadian or English is quoted at a dis- 
count of 60 per cent, off 2x2 mesh. 19 
wire, and 55 per cent, off 2x2 mesh 
heavier, Canadian list. 

HARVEST TOOLS — In harvest tools 
i here is a fair movement — a considerable 
improvement over last week. The dis- 
count remains at 70 per cent. 

FIREBRICKS - There is a moderate 
demand. We quote as follows : Scotch at 
819 to $23.50 and English at $18.50 to 
822.50 per 1,000. 

CEMENT — There is only a small de- 
mand. We quote : German cement, $2.30 to 
$2.40 ; English, $2.25 to $2.35 ; Belgian, 
$1.70 to $1.95 per bbl. ex-wharf, and 
American. $2.20 to $2.30 ex-cars. 

METALS. 

There has been little improvement in 
the metal market since our last report. 
Trade is quiet. Prices on iron pipe show 
a firm tendency. 

PIG IRON — The demand is small ai d 
prices are unchanged. We quote": Sum 
merlee, 821 to $21.50; Canadian, 818.50 
to $19. 

BAR IRON - The movement is still 
light. Merchants' bar is quoted at $1,873 
in carlots and $1.95 in small lots. Horse- 
shoe iron sells for $2.15 and $2.20. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

Merchants Bank Building, 

MONTREAL. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

IRON, 

^3 / EEL, and 

METALS. 




IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pumps 

Foroe, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We car 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 

THE H. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 

Manufacturers, Gait, Canada. 

ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 



We offer for prompt shipment 
F»ig Tin, 

L. & F. and STRAITS. 

Ingot Copper, O.O. 
Pig Lead. 
Spelter. 
Antimony. 



Nova Scotia Steel Go. 

Limited 

NEW GLASBOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers of 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIBMENS MARTIN 

Open Hearth Steel 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Your Spring stock will be up to date if 
selected from the following lines: 

ELASTIUTE VARNISH, 

Granitine Floor Finish 

Maple Leaf Coach Enamels 

Maple Leaf Varnish Stain 

Imperial Buggy Paint 

Imperial Varnish Stain 

Imperial Gold and Silver Enamels 

Imperial Household and Bath Enamels 

Aluminum Paint 

Flat Black Lacquer 

Bronzing Liquids 

Lemon Polishing Oil, Etc. 

ALSO 

Shellacs, Japans and General Varnishes 
in all grades. 

A good reason why you should buy our goods is because we lead all 
others in neat and attractive packages, advertising signs, etc. And. above all, 
our goods make and hold customers for you. 

Write for 1902 descriptive catalogue and price lists. 



L^ Imperial Varnish & Color Go. 



TORONTO, ONT., CANADA 



LIMITED 



You can buy lots of paint that will cost 
you less money, and you can sell it to those 
who do not know — once. Just once will 
you sell it. Then you wonder why your 
paint trade is not so brisk as it was a year 
ago. And lucky you are if there is not a 
decline in other branches of your business. 
You cannot build up business on poor goods. 

M Brand Paint 

is not a cheap paint, and every can is guar- 
anteed to be good. It will not sap your 
business, but build it up. 

Send for our Booklet: 
"Paint, and How to Use It." 



imited 



<.* FRANCIS-FROST C°. 

TORONTO. 
Canadian Distributing Agents for Grippin's Crack Filler. 



BLACK SHEETS — There is but little 
doing. Retail stocks have been pretty 
well suited up, and this demand has 
fallen off. We quote as follows : 28 gauge, 
§2.65 ; 20 gauge, §2.60 ; 20 to. 24 gauge, 
§2.50, and 8 to 20 gauge, $2.50. 

GALVANIZED IRON — Trade remains 
very quiet. We quote as follows ; 
No. 28, Queen's Head, §4.40; Apollo, LOg 
oz., §4.40 ; Cornel, §4.25 with 10c. extra 
in less than case lots. 

INGOT COPPER — The market is not 
active. The price is 14*c. 

INGOT TIN — The price of Straits re 
mains at 27c. The demand is light. 

PIG LEAD — The demand keeps up and 
a fair movement is reported. We quote 
§3.15 to §3.20. 

LEAD PIPE - A change has been 
made in the discount, it now being 35 
per cent, instead of 30 per cent, on 
ordinary composition and waste. We 
quote 7*c for composition waste and 7c. 
for ordinary. 

IRON PIPE -- No changes have been 
made in prices, but they are, if any- 
thing, still firmer. The demand is good. 
Our quotations are as follows 



pipe, 



§3.00 per 100 feet ; 



§2.05 



4, §3.10 ; |, §3.45 ; 1-inch, §5 ; I * , §7.10 ; 
II, §8.50; 2-inch, §11.35. Galvanized, \ 
§4.40 ; f, §5 ; 1-inch, $7.15 ; H, §10 ; I J 
§12 . 2-inch. §15.95. 

TINPLATES — Trade is quiet. Cokes 
arc worth $3.75 to $4 and charcoal, §4.25 
to 84.50. 

CANADA PLATE - There is nol much 
doing. We quote : 52's, §2.05 to $2.70 ; 
60' s, §2.75 to §2.80 ; 75's, $2.80 to §2.85 ; 
full polished, $3.75, and galvanized, $4.25 
to $4.35. 



STEEL — There is only a moderate 
business doing. Prices are firm. We quote: 
Sleigh shoe, §2.05; tire, §2.15; bar, §2; 
spring, §2.85 ; machinery, §2.85, and toe- 
calk, §2.60. 

SHEET STEEL — There is not much 
doing. We quote as follows : Nos. IU 
to 2U, §2.50; 3-16, §2.50; i, 5-16 and |, 
§2.40. 

TOOL STEEL — Trade is a little bet- 
ter. We quote : Black Diamond, 8c; 
Jcssop's, 13c. 

TERNE PLATES — There is not much 
business being done this week. Prices are 
$7.75 to ' Ss . 

COIL CHAIN — There is only a light 
movement. We quote as follows : No. 
6, 12*c; No. 5, 10*c; No. 4, 10c; 
No. 3, 9*c; £-ih., 7£c. per lb.; 5-16, 
§4.80; 5-16 exact, §5.25; |, §4.25; 7-16, 
§4.05; *, §3.85; 9-16, $3.75; f, §3.55; 
•', §3.50: i, §3.45; 1-in., §3.45. In ear 
load lots an allowance of 10c. is made. 

SHEET ZINC — Trade is dull. Prices 
remain at §5.75 to §6.25. 

ANTIMONY — There is little doing. 
We still quote 10c. 

/INC SPELTER — The price is 5c 
with little doing. 

SOLDER — Trade is moderate. We 
quote : Bar solder at 18c; wire -oldr, 
21) cents. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

The brisk business which sprang up a 
week or so ago is still keeping up. White 
lead is selling well under the new prices. 
The feeling in turpentine is becoming 
stronger and advances are expected. We 
quote : 

WHITE LEAD— Best brands. Govern- 
ment standard, $5.87* ; No. 1, $5.50 ; No. 



2 §5.12*; No. 3, $4.75; No. 4, $4.37* 
all f.o.b. Montreal. Terms, 3 per cent, 
cash or four months. 

DRY WHITE LEAD-$5.25 in casks ; 
kegs, $5.50. 

DRY WHITE ZINC - Pure dry, 6£c. ; 
No. 1, 5£c. ; in oil, pure, 7Jc. ; No. 1, 
6£c ; No. 2, 5Jc. 

PUTTY — We quote : Bulk, in bbls., 
§1.90 per 100 lb. ; bulk, in less quantity, 
$2.05 ; bladders, in bbls., $2.25 ; blad- 
ders, in 100 or 200 lb. kegs or boxes, 
§2.40 ; in tins, $2.55 to $2.65 ; in less 
than 100-tb. lots, $3 f.o.b. Montreal, 
Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph. Maritime Provinces, 10c. high- 
er, f.o.b. St. John and Halifax. 

ORANGE MINERAL— Casks, 7c. ; 100 
tb. kegs, 7£c. ; smaller quantities, 8£c. 

RED LEAD — Genuine red lead in 
casks, $4.50; in 100-tb. kegs, $4.75; less 
quantities, $5.75 per 100 lb. No. 1 red 
lead, casks, §4.25 ; kegs, $4.50, and 
smaller quantities, $5.50. 

LITHARGE— Ground, casks, 5c. ; less, 
5*c. ; flake litharge, casks, $5.25 ; smalls, 
§5.75 per 100 lb. 

LINSEED OIL— Raw, 75c; boiled, 78c 
in 5 to 9 bbls., lc less, 10 to 20 bbl. 
lots open, net cash, plus 2c. for four 
months. Delivered anywhere in Ontario 
between Montreal and Oshawa at 2c. per 
gal. advance and freight allowed. 

TURPENTINE — Single bbls., 60c ; 2 to 
4 bbls., 59c; 5 bbls. and over, open 
terms. 

SHELLAC VARNISH — Pure white, 
§2.35 to $2.45 ; orange, $2.25 to $2.35. 

MIXED PAINTS— $1.20 to $1.45 per 
gal. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



23 



CASTOR OIL— 8f to 9|c. in wholesale 
lots, and £c. additional for small lots. 

SEAL OIL— 47£ to 49c. 

COD OIL— 32£ to 35c. 

PARIS GREEN - Petroleum barrels, 
I6|c. per ft.; arsenic kegs, 17c; 50 and 
100-ft. drums, 17£c; 25-ft. drums, 18c. ; 
1-ft. packages, lS^c; ^ ft. packages, 
20^c. ; 1-ft. tins, 19£c; i-tb. tins, 2Hc. 
f.o.b. Montreal. Terms : 3 per cent. 30 
days, or four months from date of 
delivery. 

GLASS. 

Though the market is not very active, 
quite a few orders have been booked for 
spring delivery. Prices remain Graf. 
We quote as follows : First break, 50 
feet, |2.10; second, $2.20 for 50 feet; 
first break, 100 feet, $4 ; second break, 
§4.20 ; third break, $4.70, and fourth 
break, §4.95. 

SCRAP METALS. 

A fairly good movement prevails. Prices 
remain steady, as follows : Heavy cop- 
per and wire, 13£ to 14c. per 
ft. ; light copper, 12 to 12^c; heavy 
brass, 12 • to 12£c; heavy yellow, 9£c; 
light brass, (He; lead, 2f to 2fc. per ft.; 
zinc, 2 to 2£e; iron, No. 1, wrought, §10 
light brass, O^c; lead, 2£ to 2|c. per ft.; 
zinc, 2 to 2£e; iron, No. 1, wrought, $10 
to $15 per gross ton f.o.b. Montreal ; 
stove plate, $8 to $9 ; machinery scrap. 
$14 ; light iron, No. 2, $5 a ton ; malle- 
able and steel, $4 ; rags, country, 60 to 
70c. per 100 ft.; old rubbers, 1 to 7£c. 
per ft. 

HIDES. 

We quote : No. 1 hides, 7£c; No. 2, 
6$c; No. 3, 5£c. Sheepskins, 60c. 

MARKET NOTES. 

Spring wire is now $1.25 extra, an ad- 
\ a nee of 5c. 

The discount on fme wire has been 
changed to 22^ per cent. 

Smooth steel wire, both bright iron 
and annealed, is now on a $2.60 basis. 

Fence staples are 35c. lower per keg 
for bright, and 50c. lower for galvanized. 

Brass and copper wire are discounted 
at 60 per cent, instead of 55 and 2^ per 
cent. off. 

Wire nails have been reduced 30c. for 
small lots and 27£c. for carlots. Cut 
nails, 20c. for small lots and 17^c. for 
carlots. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, January 17, 1902. 
HARDWARE. 

THE feature of the hardware trade 
this week is the reduction in the 
price of a number of staple lines. 
These lines are in wire, wire nails, cut 
nails, pressed spikes, lead pipe, shot and 
.staples. Trade, generally, is fairly good. 
The demand principally is on future ac- 
count, some orders being taken even for 
' sued autumn goods as stovepipes, elbows, 
etc The sorting-up trade for skates and 
Hockey sticks is good. A few horseshoes 
abd horse nails are going out. Some 
business on future account is still being 
done in barb and plain galvanized wire, 
poultry netting, harvest tools, green wire 
cloth and screen doors and windows. 

BARB WIRE.— A fair business is being 
done on importation account at steady 
and unchanged prices. We quote, f.o.b. 
Cleveland, $2.77^ for less than carlots. 
and $2.65 for carlots. From stock To- 
ronto, $3. 



GALVANIZED WIRE.— Some busim 
is also being done in this line on im- 
portation account. We quote : Nos. 6, 
7 and S, $3.50 to $3.85 per 100 lb., accord- 
ing to quantity ; No. 9, $2.85 to $3.15 ; 
No. 10, $3.60 to $3.95; No. 11, $3.70 to 
$4.10; No. 12, $3 to $3.30; No. 13, $3 10 
to $3.40 ; No. 14, $4.10 to $4.50; No. 15, 
$4.60 to $5.50 ; No. 16, $4.85 to $5.35, 
Nos. 6 to 9 base f.o.b. Cleveland arc 
quoted at $2.52^ in less than carlots and 
12c. less for carlots of 15 tons. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.— There has 
been quite a change. The base price has 
been fixed at §2.60 per 100 ft., and oiled 
and annealed is no longer sold at net 
figures. Oiling, 10c; coppering, 60c, and 
tinning $2 per LOO ft. extra. A few order.-, 
are being placed for oiled and annealed 
lor future delivery. Delivery points, To- 
ronto, Hamilton, London and Montreal, 
with freights equalized on those points. 

WIRE NAILS.— The base price is 30c 
per keg lower on less than carlots and 
25c lower on carlots. We quote $2.55 for 
less than carlots, and $2.50 for carlots. 
Delivery points, Toronto, Hamilton, Lon- 
don, Gananoque and Montreal. 

CUT NAILS.— These are 20c lower on 
less than carlots and 17£c. lower on car- 
lots. We quote base price $2.35 per keg 
with 7^c. allowance on carlots. 

HORSE NAILS.— A fair demand is re- 
ported this week. Discounts are : " ('■" 
brand, oval head, 50 and 7£ per cent., 
and on " M " and other brands, 50, 10 
and 5 per cent. Countersunk head 60 per- 
cent. All the manufacturers are now un- 
derstood to be selling off the same list. 

HORSESHOES. — There are a few going 
out. We quote f.o.b. Toronto, as fol- 
lows : Iron shoes, No. 2 and larger, light, 
medium and heavy, $3.60 ; snow shoes, 
$3.85 ; ' light steel shoes, $3.70 ; feather- 
weight (all sizes), $4.95; iron shoes, No. 
1 and smaller, light, medium and heavy 
(all sizes), $3.85 ; snow shoes, $4 ; light 
steel shoes, $3.95"; featherweight (all 
sizes), $4.95. 

SCREWS.— A fair trade is still being- 
done. The discounts are : Flat head 
bright, 87^ and 10 per cent.; round head 
bright, 82£ and 10 per cent.; flat head 
brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round head 
brass, 75 and 10 per cent.; round head 
bronze, 65 per cent., and flat head bronze 
70 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS.-The demand 
continues good. We quote : Iron 

rivets, 60 and 10 per cent.; iron burrs, 55 
per cent.; copper rivets and burrs, 25 and 
5 per cent. 

BOLTS AND NUTS. -Trade is still 
active. We quote : Carriage bolts, com 
mon ($1 list), 55 and 5 per cent.: carriage 
bolts, full square ($2.40 list), 60 and 5 
per cent.; carriage bolts, Norway iron 
($3 list). 60 and 5 per cent.; machine 
bolts, all sizes, 55 and 5 per cent.; coach 
screws. 70 per cent. 

ROPE.— There is only a moderate trade 
being- done. We quote : Pure manila, 16c. ; 
British manila, 13'c; sisal, 12c. 

CUTLERY. — Only a moderate sorting- 
up trade can be reported. 

SPORTING GOODS.— Quiet a few hockey 
sticks and skates are still going out, but 
trade, generally, in sporting goods, is 
quiet . 

DAIRY SUPPLIER. The movement in 
tinned iron and milk can trimmings has 
continued brisk during the week. Dis 
count on milk can trimmings, 25 per 
cent. 

CEMENT.— Owing to the cold weather 
no orders of any extent are expected till 
the spring commences to open up. Prices 
are steady. We now quote as follows ; 




Corrugated Iron 

For Sidings, c Rpofings, 
Ceilings, Etc. 

Absolutely free from defects — made 
from very finest sheets. 

Each sheet is accurately squared, 
and the corrugations pressed one at a 
time — no* rolled— giving an exact fit 
without waste. 

Any desired sizeor gauge— galvan- 
ized or painted — straight or curved. 

Send us your specifications. 

The cMetallic Roofing Co. 

WHOLESAtE MANFRS. UMrPBD 
TORONTO, CANADA. 



Canadian Portland, Rathbun's ''Star," 
32.25 to $2.65; " Beaver," $2.10 to $2.50; 
'•Ensign," $1.90 to $2.30; German, $3.15; 
English, $3 ; Belgian, $2.50 to $2.75 ; 
Canadian hydraulic, $1.25 to $1.50 per 
bbl. 

FENCE STAPLES.--These are lower in 
price, now being quoted at $2.90 for 
bright, and $3.25 for galvanized. 

POULTRY NETTING.— An occasional 
order for future delivery is being re- 
ceived. We quote as follows : 2-inch mesh, 
19 w.g., discount 60 per cent.; 2-inch 
mesh, 18 w.g. and heavier, 50 and 10 per 
cent. 

METALS. 

The metal trade for this time of the year 
continues fairly good. 

Pig Iron — The tone of the pig iron market 
is still firm. According to advices from 
Pittsburg the United States Steel Corpora- 
tion has this week Durchased 100,000 tons 
of Bessemer iron. Locally, trade is fair. 
We quote J 17. 50 to $ 18 on track Toronto. 

Bar Iron — The demand continues good. 
Base price $1. 95 to $2 05. Extras cut to 
length while rolling: 2 ft. and over, 10c. 
per 100 lb.; 1 ft. and under 2 ft., 15c; 
under 1 ft., 20c. ; over 20 ft. by special 
agreement, according to length and size. 

Steel — Prices are being well main- 
tained, but the demand is moderate. We 
quote as follows : Merchantable cast 
steel, 9 to 15c. per lb. ; drill steel, 8 
to loc. per lb.; "BC" and "Black 
Diamond " tool steel, 10 to 11c. ; Jessop's, 
Morton's and Firth's tool steel, 14c; 
toe calk steel, $2.85 to ^3 ; tire steel, $2.30 
to $2.50 ; sleighshoe steel, $2. 10 to $2.25; 
reeled machinery steel, $3, hoop steel, 
$3.10. 

Black Sheets — The demand during the 
past week has been good. We quote : 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Common, $3 15 for 28 gauge; and dead 
flat, $2.50 for 26 gauge. 

Canada Plates — The demand has fallen 
off during the week, although a fair busi- 
ness is still being done for this time of the 
year, We quote: All dull, S3. 00; half 
polished, $3.10 ; all bright, S3. 75. 

Galvanized Sheets — Some import 
orders are being placed for Spring delivery, 
and business generally is good. We quote 
as follows: "Queen's Head" brand at 
$4.50 in case lots, and $4 65 in less 
quantities. 

Tin — The outside markets are still some- 
what irregular, but their tone is rather bet- 
ter. New York is rather firmer, while 
London is slightly lower. Locally we still 
quote $29 to #30. The demand is fair for 
small quantities. 

Tinplates — The demand on spring de- 
livery account is good, and a few small 
orders from stock are reported. We still 
quote I C coke plates at $4.25. 

Tinned Sheets — Quite a few small 
orders from stock are being taken care of 
this week. We quote : 72 x 30, up to 24 
gauge, 7^c. ; ditto, up to 26 gauge, 8c. 

Terne Plates — Trade is quiet. We still 
quote : I C, 20 x 28 gauge, at $8 50. 

Copper — An active business is being 
done this week in ingot copper at lower 
prices, namely, $15 per 100 lb. There is 
still a good trade being done in sheet copper 
at $23 to $25 per 100 lb. 

Brass — A fair business is being done 
this week. Discount is 10 per cent, on rod 
and sheet. 

Solder — The demand is good with 
ptices lower. We quote : Half and-half, 
guaranteed, 19c; do. commercial, i8^c; 
refined, 18c. ; wiping, \7yic 

Lead — The demand is good. London 
was 2s. 6d. higher on Monday. We quote : 
S3- 50 to S3. 75 for pig lead and $5 for bar. 

Iron Pipe — Business keeps moderate. 
We quote : Black pipe, $5.40 for i-inch. 

Lead Pipe — Prices are lower, the dis- 
count being 35 per cent, instead of 30 per 
cent. 

Antimony — A fair business is being done 
at 10 to lie. per lb. 

Spelter — Trade is quiet. We quote 
S550 to $6 per 100 lb. 

Zinc Sheet — Trade is quiet at $6 to 
$6 25. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

Owing to the reduction in white lead, it 
has been quite active, a number of orders 
being booked for future delivery. Linseed 
oil is unsetted, the lower quotations of the 
English product being the cause. Turpen- 
tine has been advanced 2c. per gal. There 
is no other change. We quote : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $5.87^ ; No. 1, $5.50; No. 2. $5.12^ ; 



No. 3, S4-75 : No - 4. S4-37'£ »n pkgs. 
of 25 lb. and upwards ; ^c. per lb. extra 
will be charged for 12^ lb. pkgs. ; genuine 
dry white lead in casks, $5. 12^ . 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb. 
$$. 12%; ditto, in kegs of ioolb., #5.50; No. 
1, in casks of 560 lb., S4 ; ditto, kegs of 
100 lb., $4.50. 

Litharge — Genuine, 6 to 6^c. 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 7% to 8c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $6 to $6.25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Benzine — In barrel lots, i6y£c. per gal. ; 
less quantities, 25c. per gal. 

Paris White — 90c. to $1 per 100 lb. 

Whiting — 65c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 35c; in less 
than cases, 40c. per lb. 

Liquid Shellac — Pure orange, in bbls., 
$2 25 to S2.35 ; white, S2.35 to S2 45 per 
gal.; in less quantities, 10:. extra. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., S2.25; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2.40; bulk in bbls., 
Si. 90; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 
lb., S2.05 ; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., S2.90. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, Si .90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, S2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, Si 20 to $1.30 per 
gal. 

Castor Oil — English, in cases, 9*4 to 
10c. per lb. and 10 to io^c. for single tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 77c; 
boiled, 80c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 76c; 
boiled, 79c, delivered. To Toronto, 
Hamilton and London, 2c. less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 61c; 2 
to 4 barrels, 60c, delivered. Toronto, 
Hamilton and London ic. less. For less 
quantities than barrels, 5c. per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5 gallon packages, 
50c, and 10 gallon packages, 80c. will be 
charged. 

GLASS. 

Trade in glass continues slow, the retail 
business having greatly falling off. We quote 
as follows : Under 26 in., $4.25 ; 26 
to 40 in., S4-65; 41 to 50 in., S5.10 ; 51 to 
60 in., SS-3S ; 6 i to 70 in., $5.75 ; 
71 to 80, S6.25 ; 81 to 85, S7 ; 86 to 90, 
$7 75 ; Toronto, Hamilton and London. 
Terms, 4 months, or 3 per cent. 30 days. 
OLD MATERIAL. 

The prices are more stable, no change 
this week being noticed. Trade is quiet 
but steady. We quote as follows : 
Agricultural, 60c. per cwt.; machinery cast, 
60c. ; heavy copper, 11c. per lb. ; stove 
cast, 40c. ; No. 1 wrought, 50c. per 
100 lb. ; new light scrap copper, 9c. 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cle ning Cutlery. 
6d. and is. Canisters. 

WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Hills, London, England. 

Agent: 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 



COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, NY. 

Steel Carriage and 

Wagon Jacks, 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BY JOBBERS AT MFRS. PRICES. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

* 6* U ' ^i -^f Largest Variety, 
&>*"'J^~Z/ / /J- Toilet i Hand, Electric Power| 

'are the best. 

High e§t Quality Grooming and 
8beep -Shearing Machine* 

WE MAKE THEM. 

BIND FOB CATAXOSTTa TO 
Aaarlaaa Shearar Mtf. Co., Raikiia, H.H..C8A 





NEWMAN'S PATENT 
INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRINGS 

Combine all the qualities desirable in a Door Closer- 
They work silently and effectually, and never get 
out of order. In use in many of the public build- 
ings throughout Ureat Britain and the Colonies. 
MADE SOLED Y BY 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



Oneida Community Goods 

HALTERS, COW TIES, SNAPS, etc., etc., 

in all sizes and styles. May be had of all 
jobbers throughout Canada. 

Factory— NIAGARA FALLS, OUT. 



Mackenzie Bros. 

HARDWARE 
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS, 

WINNIPEG 
MAN. 



Travellers covering Manitoba, 
Northwest Territories and 
British Columbia. 

Correspondence Solicited. 



" F>UL_L-rVIAIM " 

TROUSER.'or.SKIRT HANGERS. 

TWO ^as. SIZES 




PULLMAN SASH BALANCE CO. 
ROCHESTER, N.Y., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 



8c; 
lead, 
6c; 
6oc. 



per lb.; bottoms, 8c; coil wire, 12c; 

light brass, 6c; heavy yellow brass 
heavy red brass, aj£c. ; scrap 
2#c ; z j nc> 2c. ; scrap rubber, 
good country mixed rags, 50 to 
clean dry bones, 40 to 45c. per 

1 00 1^. 

HIDES. SKINS AND WOOL. 

There is a quiet movement with steady- 
prices. We quote prices paid by buyers on 
arrival : 

Hides— We quote : No. 1, green, 7^c; 
No. 2 green, 6^c. ; No. 1 green, steers, 8c. ; 
No. 2 green, steers, 7c; cured, 71/ to 

Skins — We quote : No. 1 calfskins, 9c ; 
and No. 2, 7c; deacons (dairies) 55 to 60c. 
each ; sheepskins, 65 to 75c. ; deerskins, 
\%y z \.o 14c per lb. 

Wool — We quote: Fleece, 13c, and 
unwashed. 7 to 8c. per lb. 
SEEDS. 

The red clover market is fairly steady. 
Alsike is very dull owing to the absence of 
export orders making it difficult to quote 
prices, and jobbers are not inclined to pay 
above $6 to $7.50 f.o.b. at outside points. 
Timothy is 25c. per bush, higher. The 
following figures are what dealers are pay- 
ing at outside points. We quote : Red 
clover, #5 to #5.40 ; alsike, $6.50 to 
"".50, and timothy, $2.50 to $3 25 per 



bush. 



PETROLEUM. 

is a good trade doing 



There is a good trade doing with 
unchanged prices. We quote as fol- 
lows : Pratt's Astral, 16^ to 17c. 
in bulk (barrels, extra) ; Americar. 
water white, 17 to I7^c in barrels ; 
Photogene, 16^ to 17c. ; Sarnia water 
white, 16 to i6^c in barrels; Sarnia prime 
white, I4J£ to 15c in barrels. 

COAL. 

Soft coal and coke still continue scarce, 
as are also nut and hard coal. The situation 
is not much diffetent than formerly. We 
quote at international bridges : Grate, 
$4.75 per gross ton; egg, stove and nut, $5 
per gross ton ; soft coal, $2.50 to $3 .25 in 
bond, according to grade. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Fence staples are quoted lower. 

The discount on shot is 22 % per cent. 

Wire nails are 30c, and cut nails 20c. 
lower. 

In turpentine there is an advance of 2c 
per gallon. 

Discount on lead pipe has been increased 
to 35 per cent. 



HARDWARE FIRM INCORPORATED. 

At the office of the Secretary of State of 
Canada, the J. H. Ashdown Hardware Co., 
Limited, of Winnipeg, has applied for and 
obtained incorporation as a joint stock 
company, with a total capital of $1,000,- 
000 divided into 10,000 shares of $100 
each. 



ARCADE BRAND 



FILES 



AND 



Have all the superior merits of the 
best Hand Cut Files. 




Warranted 



FAST CUTTING 
AND SUPERIOR 
TEMPER. 



Arcade Files have 

been manufactured 

for over fifty years and 

have stood the test of time. 



Manufactured by 



NICHOLSON FILE CO., 



(Dominion Works) 



Walter Grose 



Selling Agent, 



MONTREAL 



PORT HOPE, ONT. 

For Sale by- 
Canada Hardware Co., Montreal. 
Kerr & Robertson, St. John, N.B. 
W. B. Arthur & Co., Halifax, N.S. 
Nelson Hardware Co., Nelson, B.C. 
Codere, Sons & Co., Sherbrooke, P.Q. 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Sluds, 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 

INGERSOLL, ONT. 




GLASS- 



Art Leaded Glass. 

Plate and Window Glass 

Prismatic Glass. 

All Glass required for building 
Catalogue and Prices on Application. 

THE WOOD ART GLASS CO., London, Ont. 



INDUSTRIAL GOSSIP. 

Those having any liems of news suitable for this column 
will confer a favor by forwarding them to this office 
addressed to the Editor. 

Already the new foundry of K. C. 
Beach & Co., at Winchester, Ont., has 
been made ready for business. Much lar- 
ger than the old establishment, the facili- 
ties for turning out most modern work 
with greater promptness have been 
increased, and a nickle plant has been 
installed. This is a new ana important 
addition to their plant. It is operated 
by an expert. 

It is expected that the blooming- mill 
of The Dominion Iron and Steel Com- 
pany, at Sydney, C.B., will be ready be- 
tween the first and 15th of February, 
when the manufacture of steel will be 
rommenced. Only steel ingots can be 
cast at present, three castings having so 
far been made at the open hearth, all of 
which have turned out very satisfactory. 

The total value of the output of all the. 
manufacturing establishments of Am- 
herst. N.S., for 1901, was $2,380,000. 
Over §455,200 was paid out in wages in 



the different factories of the town, dur- 
ing the same period. 



In connection with the I.C.R. a new 
coal hoist will be built at Sydney, C.B., 
as soon as the round house, which is now 
under construction, is completed. A two- 
storey building, 50 by 70 feet, is what 
the plans call for. The foundation work 
will require over 2,000 yards of concrete 
for its completion. The new hoist is of 
a United States patent. The coal will 
be dropped into a receptacle underneath 
the track from the cars. From there it 
will be carried up to the second floor by 
a conveying belt, and stored. The ashes 
from the engines will be loaded on a car 
<ni the opposite side of the building in a 
similar manner. 



Thomas Lougheed, Shallow Lake. Ont., 
has purchased the hardware business of 
Irwin Rusk, Southampton, Ont., who in- 
tends going South for his health. 

A fire in the hardware store of Magnan 
Freres, St. Catherine street, Montreal, on 
January 8, did $1,000 damage. This is 
covered by insurance. 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, January 13, 1902. 

THE usual calm and absence of news 
pervades hardware circles. Busi- 
ness is very fair, and prices are firm 
with a tendency to advance. There has 
been an advance in manila in the east, but 
we have not as yet put it into force here. 
Paints and oils are practically the same. 
Travellers are booking a good many orders 
for spring delivery, but at the present time 
little is being done. The cutter trade has 
been very seriously reduced owing to the 
general absence of snow, and agents are 
now trying hard to clear up remaining 
stocks, and considerable inducements are 
being offered to that end. Already orders 
are being booked for the buggy and wagon 
trade of the spring, which promises to be a 
large one. 

Barbed wire, 100 lb S3 30 

Plain twist 3 40 

Staples 3 95 

Oiled annealed wire 10 3 95 

" n 4 00 

" I2 4 °5 

13 4 20 

J 4 4 35 

15 4 45 

wire nails, 30 to 60 dy, keg 3 55 

16 and 20 3 65 

10 3 65 

8 3 75 

6 3 80 

4 3 95 

3 4 20 

Cut nails, 3oto6ody 3 25 

" 20 to 40 3 30 

ioto 16 3 35 

8 3 40 

° 3 45 

4 3 55 

3 3 9° 

Horsenails, 45 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 65 

No. 2 and larger 4 40 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 90 

No. 2 and larger 4 40 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 4 95 

No. 2 and larger 4 70 

Bar iron, $2.70 basis. 
Swedish iron, $5.00 basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 25 

Spring steel 3 25 

Machinery steel 3 75 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 8 50 

Jessop 13 00 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 375 

28 gauge 4 00 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . . 2 79 

18 to 22 gauge 4 75 

24 gauge 5 00 

26gauge 5 25 

28gauge 5 50 

Genuine Russian ,1b 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 75 

26 gauge 8 00 

28 gauge 8 so 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box n 00 

" IX 13 00 

IXX " 1500 

Ingot tin 33 

Canadaplate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 3 75 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 co 

Broken lots 7 50 

Pig lead, 100 lb 6 00 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch 50 an 10 p.c. 

Over 2 inch 50 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger $13 00 

H 13 5° 

Yt, and 5-16 1375 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 16 00 

% 16 5° 

" Yt, and 5-16 1700 

Solder 20 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 17 

Axes, chopping $ 7 50 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 



Screws, flat head, iron, bright 87M 

Round" " 82M 

Flat " brass 80 

Round" " 75 

Coach 57 yt p.c. 

Bolts, carriage 50 p.c. 

Machine 50 p.c. 

Tire 60 p.c. 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 4op.c. 

Rivets, iron 50 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 35 

Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 70 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz. . $2 50 

No. 1 1 50 

No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra 1 75 

No. 1 ! 25 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C. F. pistol 5P-C. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge black 16 50 

chilled, 12 gauge 18 00 

soft, 10 gauge 21 00 

chilled, 10 gauge 23 00 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 25 

Chilled 6 75 

Powder, F.F., keg 4 75 

F.F.G 5 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 75 and 2'A p.c. 

plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 



PETROLEUM. 



Water white American 
Prime white American. . 
Water white Canadian . 
Prime white Canadian. 



25J4c- 
24c- 
22c. 

2il4c. 



PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 



Turpentine, pure, in barrels g 62 

Less than barrel lots 67 

Linseed oil, raw 84 

Boiled 87 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor 27 }£ 

Eldorado engine 26K 

Atlantic red 29% 

Renown engine 41 

Black oil 19 % 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 to 74 

Harness oil 65 

Neatsfoot oil $ 1 00 

Steam refined oil 85 

Sperm oil 2 00 

Castor oil per lb. 1 1 % 

Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 

united inches 2 50 

26 to 40 per 50 ft. 2 75 

41 to 50 " 100 ft. 600 

51 to 60 " " " 6 50 

61 to 70 per 100-ft. boxes 7 00 

Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 2K 

kegs " 2& 

White lead, pure per cwt. 6 50 

No. 1 " 6 00 

Prepared paints, pure liquid colors, ac- 
cording to shade andcolor, per gal. $1.30 to$i.c,o 



NOTES. 

Mr. Cowan, an extensive owner of lumber 
mills and timber limits at Prince Albert, 
was in the city last week on his way east to 
participate in a family reunion. Mr. Cowan 
reports an immense lumber trade in their 
section last season and excellent prospects 
for the coming spring. Their cut will be 
about 4,000,000 feet. 

The Western Lumbermen's Association 
are expected to meet during the bonspiel. 
The implement men will also meet at that 
time. 

Mr. Hiram Miller, of the firm of Miller, 
Morse & Co., has returned from an ex- 
tended eastern trip. 



R. BAILEY & SON 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



STOVE LININGS f a °n r d R i?*%\ 3 . 

All kinds of Fire Brick and Fire Clay Work, 
Paving Tile, etc. . 
Wholesale Only. - - Write for particulars. 

1220 Yonge Street, TORONTO. 



ONTARIO SILVER 00., 

Limited, 
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

Manufarturen nf F «-ATWARE, CUTLERY and 
manuiaciurers ot ELECTRO PLATE. 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 

THE OSHAWA WIRE 
1 FENCE CO., LIMITED 

OSHAWA, ONT. 



Manufacturers of Woven Wire Fencing, 
Gates, Etc, 

Also Dealers in Galvanized Fence Wire. 

Agents Wanted. 
Send for Catalogue and Prices. 



TO THE TRADE: 

We quote the following prices 
for Incandescent Gas supplies : 

EACH. 

Beacon Post Burners, ... ig c 

No. 18, Incandescent Post Burners, - 15c. 

Beacon Gallery Burners, - - - l"c. 

No. 18, Incandescent Gallery Burners, - 14c. 

"Gloria" Triple- weave Mantles, - 15c. 

"United" Single-weave " - - He. 

PER DOZ. 

Gasoline Mantles, highest grade, - $3.00 

Combination Chimneys, - - - 1.10 

Lighthouse " - - - - 1.10 

Best Lead Chimneys, small, - - 90c, 

Bulb Globes, all styles, - - - 00c. 

No. 74, Porcelain Crimp Shades, - 90c. 

to-inch Porcelain Dome Shades, - - 2 40 

Crown Canopies, - - - - 1.50 

3 leg .... 70c. 

Torches, - 1.25 

Wax Tapers, per do/.en boxes, - ROc. 

Hoping to be favored with your 
orders. 

Yours truly, 

The United Incandescent Light Co., 

7 Yonge St. Arcade, • TORONTO. 

Phone Main 969. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION. 

AT a meeting of the executive of the 
Canadian Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion in Toronto on January 16, how 
the tide of emigration from Great Britain 
may be diverted to Canada formed the chief 
topic df consideration. Jas. P. Murray in an 
address in which he mentioned the fact that 
out of people leaving Great Britain last 
year, only 19 000 came to Canada, 15,000 
went to Australia, 27,000 to South Africa, 
and over 100,000 to the United States, 
moved a resolution asking the various 
boards of trade of Canada to join the 
Association in sending representatives to 
Great Britain to invite the various trade 
boards there to cooperate in diverting the 
tide of immigration to this country. He 
touched upon the various advantages offered 
by each Province in support of this, and 
suggested that to finance that deputa- 
tion, each Province through its representa- 
tive board of trade might grant a contribu- 
tion, and that the Dominion Government 
might also contribute something towards it. 

Before any action should be taken it 
would be necessary to obtain an expression 
of opinion from the members of the Asso- 
ciation. On the report of the exhibition 
committee, a letter will be sent to the city 
council saying that the Association is not in 
favor of an all Canadian exhibition for 
1902, and think that it is not possible to 
take that matter up before 1903. 

The executive committee do not think that 
the Government will deal with the Patent Act 
this year, so some changes were suggested 
that might be made without taking up 
the question of the entire Act. They 
state that they are in favor that on cer- 
tain articles the words " Copyrighted 
in Canada " should be used instead 
of the present lengthy notification ; that 
special arrangements be made to pro- 
tect all labels, etc., with slight cost, and 
a special effort be made to catch up with 
arrears of work in Patent Office by the 
appointment of special examiners. 

To urge upon the Government the adop- 
tion of the suggestion of the Association 
regarding the appointment of Canadian 
agents abroad, the chairman of the com- 
mercial intelligence committee and the 
secretary will go to Ottawa next week. 

They received the resolution of the Hali- 
fax Board of Trade regarding the handing 
over of the I.C.R. to the C.P.R. The rail- 
way and transportation committee will deal 
with this matter. 

The secretary was asked to send a letter 
to Sir Wilfrid Laurier asking him to invite 
the Hon. Edmund Barton, the Premier of 
Australia, and Hon. R. J. Seddon, Premier 



of New Zealand, to pay a visit to Canada 
when they are returning home from the 
coronation ceremonies. 



TALK WITH A MEDICINE HAT 
HARDWAREMAN. 

THIS week Hardware and Metal 
had the pleasure of interviewing W. 
B. Marshall, a hardware merchant 
and prominent citizen of Medicine Hat, in 
the Canadian Northwest, who is in Toronto 
on business. Our reporter found him at the 
Iroquois Hotel conversing with a number of 
friends who had called on him. Mr. 
Marshall appears to be endued with un- 
limited confidence in the future of the great 
Northwest. 

Prospects are bright for Medicine Hat," 
he affirmed. "We only want more settlers, 
and then our fine climate, which is never 
excessively cold (it was 70 above when I 
left there three weeks ago) is bound to 
attract. Our ranching facilities are such 
that immense herds of cattle and sheep can 
be left out to graze all winter. Numbers of 
settlers came in from across the line last 
summer, and this season prospects are 
very bright for a greater influx from the 
United States. 

" Another inducement is the quite recent 
discovery we have made," he continued, 
" and that is that the town of Medicine Hat 
is located in the midst of a large area rich in 
natural gas. This we obtained at 225 
pounds pressure after we had reached a 
depth of 213 feet, when we were utilizing it 
for our new waterworks system, which we 
succeeded in installing last summer and 
fall." 

"You think that your town will be the 
centre of numerous manufactures in conse 
quence, I suppose ? " 

"Several inquiries have already been 
made by several glass manufacturers who 
may locate there, as they make use of much 
gas in glass making. But nothing definite 
has yet been decided upon," he added. 

"You have other mineral deposits out 
there besides gas ? ' ' 

" Coal is found very close to our town, 
which can be mined and sold for less than 
$3 per ton," he replied. " It is of a soft 
variety, and exists near the surface, seams 
of it cropping out along the banks of the 
Saskatchewan river. I know of no other 
minerals," he said, " that are found in our 
neighborhood, but, as we are only 160 
miles from the Rockies, doubtless they can 
be found. 

"Just now there is an agitation on foot 
to make Medicine Hat the capital of the 
Territories, instead of Regina. That, I 
believe, will shortly come to pass," he 
concluded. 

The Francis Frost Co., Limited, Toronto, 
are issuing this week a very handsome cata- 
logue. 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

One of the neatest and most unique 
greetings for the New Year sent out by a 
business firm was that of The Francis Frost 
Co., Limited, of 223 Queen Street east, 
Toronto. It was printed on imitation parch- 
ment, and in one corner impressed in 
imitation sealing wax was the trade mark 
of the firm in gold. 

PERSONAL MENTION. 

S. H. Stevenson, who has been superin- 
tendent in the works of the Guelph Iron 
and Steel Co., has severed his connection 
with that firm and accepted a situation in 
Macdonnell & Co.'s works, Toronto. 



The Francis- Frost Co., Limited, Toronto, 
are making wonderful strides in placing their 
celebrated "Ark Brand" Paint. For some 
time the Toronto house supplied Ontario 
and the West. Last fall it was found 
necessary to establish a warehouse at Van- 
couver. Since then the Western demand has 
increased so rapidly that in order to cope 
with the trade they have been compelled to 
open a warehouse in Winnipeg. 

~ WANTED. 

WANTED TO PURCHASE— Foundry Cupola and 
Equipment; second-hand preferred. P.O. Box 
66o, Winnipeg. (4) 

FOB SALE. 

GOOD HARDWARE AND TINWARE BUS] 
ness and premises in small town, splendid 
farming locality. No opposition. Excellent oppor- 
tunity for two live men. Too much work for 
owner. Apply, Box 76, Hardware and M i 
Toronto. (5) 



FOR SALE. 



STOCK OF HARDWARE IN A HEALTHY, 
growing town in one of the best farming sec- 
tions of Nova Scotia. Every facility for doing a 
good and increasing business. Apply HARDWARE 
and Metal, Box 74. (4) 



WANTED. 



BY A WINNIPEG WHOLESALE HARD- 
ware firm, two first-class Hardware Clerks. 
Must have a thorough knowledge of hardware in 
all departments. Address applications, stating age, 
experience, references, married or single, etc., 
Drawer 1473, Winnipeg. ( 1 - 1 f . ) 

BREWERS' ENGINEERING 
BUSINESS. 

ON SALE as agoing concern, including plant 
and very valuable patent rights. Apply H. 
BOOCOCK, Solicitor, Halifax, Eng. (4) 

JONES BROS. 

Stove Biick Manufacturers. Fire Clay and Asbestos, 
Furnace Cement, all kinds of Fire ("lav Products 
made to order from patterns 
BRACONDALE P.O., ONT. (near Toronto. 

"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn " 
Patent Guard so'e maker— 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

Cables— Emlyn Engineering Works, 

Machinery," Newport, Newport, Mon., England. 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING 



AND 



PLUMBING 



BUILDING IN TORONTO. 

SINCE last Wednesday, January 8, the 
^following permits have been issued 
^from the Toronto city commissioner's 
office : To W. Scanlon, for brick cellars 
under four houses on 46 to 52 West Lodge 
avenue, to cost $1,100; to The Standard 
Chemical Co., for 'a. one storey woodshed, 
covered with galvanized non-corrosive iron, 
for storing charcoal, at the foot of Spadina 
avenue, in the G.T.R. yard, to cost $300; 
to Thomas Mcllwain, for a two storey and 
attic detached brick dwelling on Spring- 
hurst avenue, to cost $3 500 ; to Alice 
Brown, for a pair of semi detached, two- 
storey and attic brick and stone dwellings 
on Albany avenue, to cost $4,500; to Thos. 
Farley, for a brick cellar and brick front to 
dwelling on 350 Wellesley street, to cost 
$150; to the Macpherson trustees, for a 
two storey and attic brick and stone dwell- 
ing on Cluny avenue, to cost $6,000 ; to 
The T. Eaton Co,, Limited, for a four- 
storey brick outside stairway near Terauley 
street, to cost $400 ; to Mrs. C. Chilliman, 
for a two-storey roughcast dwelling on 
Duffertn street, to cost $400 ; to W. Wilson, 
for a concrete cellar under store at 113 Bay 
street, to cost $60 ; to Douglas K. Ridout, 
for a two-storey and attic brick residence 
on Crescent Road, to cost $5,000 ; to The 
Toronto City Corporation, for a two storey 
brick office and bank building at the cattle 
market in Stanley Park, Wellington avenue, 
to cost $10,000. 



BUILDING OUTLOOK IN ST. 
JOHN, N.B. 

In St. John, N.B., prospects are bright 
for a successful building year. Already 
there are being put under way the rearing 
of three large structures. The first of 
these is a large warehouse for Emerson & 
Fisher, on Canterbury street, besides a new 
factory for D. F. Brown & Co. T. S. 
Simons & Co. are having a big factory and 
warehouse built on Union street, while a 
new roundhouse for the I. C. R. will also 
be erected. 



PLUMBING INSPECTOR IN OTTAWA. 

The Ottawa Plumbers, Steam and Gasfit- 
ters' Union are being assisted by two union 
men of the Ottawa City Council in their 
endeavors to have a plumbing inspector 
appointed for that city. They say that such 
an official is needed there because of a good 
deal of defective plumbing which is done 



by unskilled workmen who are not capable 
of doing properly the work given them to 
do. It is claimed that an inspector would 
find plenty of work in examining all jobs, 
and thus protect the public against unsani- 
tary plumbing. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

The partnership of H. Brown, of Brock- 
ville, Ont., and James F. Reid, of Smith's 
Falls, Ont., who conducted a plumbing 
business at Smith's Falls, has been dis- 
solved. James F. Reid will continue. 

Bishop & Gilsby, plumbers, etc., Green- 
wood, B.C., have dissolved. 



SOME BUILDING NOTES. 

John Baxter, Brownsville, Ont., is busy 
preparing for the erection of his new house. 

Tenders are being advertised for for the 
erection of a new Roman Catholic church 
at Lanark, Ont. 

Work on Haslan, Irons & Co.'s new 
foundry on Market Place, Carleton, N.B., 
has been commenced. 

Chas. Miller, Ottay Lake, North Burgess, 
Ont., is drawing brick for a new residence 
which he is going to build next summer. 

The Liverpool, London and Globe Insur- 
ance Co. is contemplating the erection of 
an eight-storey office building at the corner 
of St. James street and Place D'Armes, 
Montreal. 

Laurie & Colby have been awarded the 
contract for the erection of a club house at 
Victoria, B. C, for the Victoria West 
Athletic Club, and are commencing work 
immediately. 

Thos. Hy. Matthew & Son, builders, 
Victoria, B.C., are reported to be making 
arrangements with an Old Country syndi- 
cate for the erection of 50 good-sized houses 
in various parts of that city. 



OFFICERS OF THE TORONTO 
ASSOCIATION. 

Several new members were admitted into 

the Master Plumbers' Association of 

Toronto, held in Pythian Hall, but the chief 

event of the evening was the election of 

officers for the year 1902, which resulted 

as follows : 

President. — R. Ross. 
First Vice-President. — Geo. Clapperton. 
Second " — Jas. Sherlock. 

Secretary. — Chas. Doughty. 
Treasurer. — H. Hogarth. 
Sergeant-at-Arms. — Geo. Cooper. 

At the next meeting of the Association 
which will be held on January 27, these 
officers will be installed. 



BUSY KINGSTON PLUMBERS. 

Kingston plumbers and steamfitters are 
finding so much work to do that they are 
advertising for plumbers and tinsmiths. 
This is an unprecedented thing, as it is 
usual for them to discharge most of their 
hands this time of the year. But a wave of 
prosperity is extending over that city which 
promises to roll money into the pockets of 
its tradesmen. 



A $7,500 CREMATORY FOR OTTAWA. 

Street Commissioner Jones, of Toronto, 
accompanied City Engineer Ker, of Ottawa, 
on a visit to several cities in regard to 
crematory plants. Now a $7,500 crematory 
is being planned for Ottawa. Work on the 
remodelling of Toronto's crematories is also 
going on, they having been found far too 
small for the work they have to perform. 



STRIKE IN A FOUNDRY. 

There is a big strike in Moncton, N.B., 
about 40 moulders and apprentices employed 
in the Record Foundry and Machine Works 
going on strike on January 10. This was 
owing to the manager refusing to recognize 
the Moulders' Union when^its representa- 
tives called on him to ask an increase of 
pay. Subsequently, it is claimed, some 
half a dozen members of this union were 
discharged, so the members thereof walked 
out. It is understood that by the new 
scale of wages demanded pieceworkers 
would get an increase of 20 per cent, and 
time hands a minimum of $2.50 per day, 
instead of the $10 to $12 per week now 
paid. 

FALL LIST ON AXES. 

The following is the fall, 1902, price list 

of the Dandas Axe Works. These prices 

will go into effect in July : 

Seconds $ 5.00 

Royal Wood Chopper 5 50 

Western Gatineau, Hickory Whacker 600 

Empire, Western pattern , 6.50 

Empire, wedge or half-wedge 6.50 

Pine Tree, round head 6.50 

Dundas Champion 6.50 

Peerless, round head 7.00 

Keen Cutter, bevelled 7.00 

All Steel, full polish 7.5c- 

Dundas Leader 7 75 

Flint Edge, hand-made 7.75 

Crown Jewel 8.00 

Perfect Phantom, Bevelled 8.25 

Perfect Jewel 9.00 

Scoring 9-5° 

Canadian, up to 4 lb 7.00 

Joiners 7.50 

Framing 9 00 

Peerless, double bits 10.00 

Dumb Champion, double bits 10.00 

Crown Jewel, double bits 11.00 

Handling, extra, No. 2 handles 1.50 

Handling, extra, No. 1 handles 2.00 



JVr 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 



PAINT 
BUSINESS. 



J W 1 ^ ij^] W7 ^B [^TnJ 1 


Jlk \ I^^lk ill 




Jp J HH 1^1 




j jiif I 


\ 




• fiv7 i n 





A. RAMSAY & SON 
MONTREAL 

The Paint Makers. 

Established 1842. 



Don't stay on the lower 
step of the paint busi- 
ness. Take a higher posi- 
tion. Watch the rapid 
upward march of this 
business — there's money 
in it for you. Look out 
for the paint that pays — 
cheap paints are out of 
it — the cry is more and 
more for good paint — 
the best paint. 

RAMSAYS 
PAINTS 

are the best in the line of 
paint making ; sold at a 
price that will yield a 
profit to you — advertised 
intelligently, honestly, in 
a helpful way. They will 
help you if you will take 
hold — help you to get a 
paint business and keep 
it. That's what we all 
do business for, isn't it ? 
Write us, or give our 
travellers a little hearing. 



BURMAN & SONS' cuppers 

• Est ate ,8 7 ,. , BIRMINGHAM, ENG. t^VM^:. 




NO. 3— POWER CLIPPER, with "Wrist Joint. 

(The Czar of Russia. 
As supplied to-j The King of Denmark. 
(Earl Roberts, Etc., Etc. 





THE "LEOPOLD" TOILET. 



THE "WARWICK" 

CLIPPER. 

Cuts over three teeth. 

As supplied to 

His Majesty's 
War Department. 



SEND FOR PRICE LIST AND TERMS. 

To be obtained from all the principal Jobbers throughout 
the Dominion. 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any towu in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from , and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject. 

CANADIAN PRESS CUPPING BUREAU, 

232 McGill Street, MONTREAL, QUE. 
Telephone Main 1255. 
10 Front St. East, Toronto. Telephone 2701 




You may be looking for 
a Good 



Pipe Hanger. 



Ask us about 



the"Grabler." 

We send you booklet illustrating 
the different kinds. 



Tne James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co. 



TORONTO. 



Limited. 




Canadian Representative: ALEXANDER GIBB, 13 St. John St., MONTREAL. 
75 YEARS. ESTABLISHED 1825. 75 YEARS. 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, ete. 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 



NEW YORK OFFICE, 90 Chambers SI. 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. SiwA Y Rn.raf.A 9 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WHAT TO DO IN JANUARY. 



THE first month of all the 12 to 
follow — the month of new resolu- 
tions — the month of changes and 
that one which decides for us the result 
pf the inventory as to whether we have 
made a dollar in the business or see 
staring us in the face the fact that we 
have lost many of them. 

After closing inventory books, after the 
dividend, if any, and after closing every 
possible account on the old books, it is a 
good time to get ready for 

THAT NEW SET OF BOOKS AND COLLECTIONS. 

No time is quite so good as the first of 
the year to start the clerical department 
entirely new, as to material to be used. 
There are many good reasons for it. in 
the first place everyone expects to pay 
his debts, if he pays at all, at that time. 
It is more convenient for him— as a rule 
he has more money, and he well knows 
it is expected of everybody. 

This season should lessen by almost 
hundreds the number of accounts to go 
into your transfer to a new and clean 
ledger, and a little printed paster slip 
put on your statement, to the effect that 
you are changing, will aid greatly in the 
collection of them. Something like this, 
which the writer has used to good ad- 
vantage : 

The new year is at hand, we expect to 
open an entire new set of books ; will 
you very kindly help us in this by favor- 
ing us with amount of above account '( 

Many people who would not ordinarily 
respond, knowing and appreciating the 
attending labor, will make it a point to 
see the account paid. 

Now, as to your books. If possible at 
all have them made to suit your wants, 
particularly ledger and cash book. Many 
bookkeepers and many proprietors prefer 
special ruling of ledger, and it costs no 
more than to buy made-up or shelf 
goods. 

In a special column cash book' — that is, 
one in which the columns are ruled for 
freight, drayage, interest and discount, 
merchandise, expenses, etc. — a great sav- 
ing in time is made and endless waste of 
pages in the new ledger are avoided. The 
matter of simplifying and shortening is a 
great item where many accounts are car- 
ried. 

JANUARY THE TIME FOR CHANGES. 

There are frequent changes in firms at 
this season, but the minor changes in 
store room and arrangement are more 
particularly referred to. You have, per- 
haps, more time at your command dur- 
ing the first two weeks of this month for 
such work than at any other season of 
the year. It is neither pleasant to the 
eye nor profitable to keep the same 
arrangement of your store running from 
year to year. The appearance of the 
store must be the loadstone to attract, 
and customers tire greatly of an everlast- 
ing sameness, and are very liable to make 
the assertion that you are drifting into 
what is termed old fogyism. 

Ft costs so little to change the arrange- 
ment, the placing and filling of show- 
cases and to add new ones where and 



when needed, and practically just as lit- 
tle for fresh paint and bright, attractive 
shelving. The addition of a wall-case 
occasionally adds wonderfully to the ap- 
pearance of a room. Let every effort that 
is made in this line tend toward the 
showing of more goods and making the 
silent salesman. A line of goods, such as 
hammers and hatchets, or saws, will sell 
themselves when exhibited in a case, 
while on the other hand customers will 
not ask for them under any cirsumstan- 
ces unless their errand be directly for 
that article. 

A NEW SET OF RULES 

for employes, if your old ones do not 
meet your views or have not been ob- 
served as they should be, or perhaps you 
have gone along without any. 

Men do not object to sets of rules in 
a store unless they be extremely arbit- 
rary ones — on the contrary, they prefer 
working under a system that tells them 
when and where and what to do without 
the continual asking, and beyond what 
their own intuition would dictate. 

In the case of but two or three em- 
ployes it may be thought not worth the 
trouble, but the writer assures you that 
lew or many sensible right lines laid 
down for their direction are appreciated 
by the men themselves and the results 
are greater and much better than where 
none at all exist. 

A little system is a help to the green 
man and a law to the older one, saving 
proprietor, too, many moments ot 
anxious worry during the day. 

HOW ABOUT ADVERTISING ? 

Has yours been a success during the past 
year '! Have you bought space and 
handled it as you would the buying of 
goods you put on your shelves Do you 
get more out of locals than you do out 
of display, or have you watched the re- 
sults of either ? 

Are you using good cuts or putting up 
the same old ones you have had for 
years ? Do you make frequent changes, 
and do you confine yourself as nearly as 
possible to one line of goods in advertis- 
ing, or jumble many together ? In the 
latter case, of course, the real object of 
your work is lost sight of and much of 
it goes for naught. ■» 

We should ask ourselves fairly and hon- 
estly these questions and look the matter 
of our advertising squarely in the face. 
More money is thrown in the fire through 
poor advertising and little attention to 
it than any of us can estimate. 

Do you advertise at all ? Many hard- 
ware merchants do not. If not, get at it 
and see the difference in your business. 
You will wonder where all the barnacles 
came from that will drop away as you 
sail along with increased trade. 

MONEY IN NEW LINES OF GOODS, 

and there is rnqney in them. January is 
a good time to decide what they are to 
be. It's very much like your old shelving 
and your showcases that are never chan- 
ged as to arrangements and contents ; 
people get tired of seeing them, and in 
these hustling days are looking for new 



lilies. You will have had continual calls 
for some one class of goods you do not 
carry— perhaps house paints, box paints 
or brushes — all profitable goods, perhaps 
more so than you imagine. It takes but 
little capital to add them, and in doing 
so it is not necessary to sell the worth- 
less paints' — the man who doesn't pay his 
debts is a part of every class of t/atle 
You will find there are great quantities 
of these lines you have not carried, sold 
all the time and at a good profit and 
for cash. 

Enameled or grey or blue ware is a 
great seller. Hollow ware is good, car- 
pet sweepers, fishing tackle and sporting 
goods in a small way. Put in lines that 
competitors don't handle ; there are any 
number of them, and they attract cus- 
tomers. 

LEST WE FORGET, 

and what should be the first thing in the 
new month, don't neglect to see the car- 
ried-over holiday goods, that positively 
do not sell during the year, put away 
safely and put away dust-proof and dirt- 
proof. For a great many goods paper 
bags are capital for this. Some of it can 
go along through the month with the 
chance of selling it, but the time comes 
for fire irons, brass sets, candelabra and 
candle sticks, brass fenders, brass hods 
and all the smaller pieces of plated, (brass 
and bright goods, and their value gets 
away unless properly wrapped and bag- 
ged and packed in a clean, dark corner. 

START WITH A CLEAN STORE. 

This month and the new year should 
see every part of the store spick and 
span and clean as clean can be. Of 
course, the inventory helps much if car- 
ried through rightly, but all of us do not 
clean up thoroughly as we go, while it is 
a fact that every man doing calling off 
should have a brush or feather duster 
near at hand, and not depend so largely 
on an after going-over, for which time 
and opportunity may never come. 

It is wonderful the amount of filth, 
etc., that gathers during the year on 
shelves, in boxes, and throughout every 
corner of a hardware store, and the time 
to clean up rightly is early in the first 
month of the year. 

THE OPPORTUNITY FOR CLEARING 
DEAD STOCK 
is in January. No other month gives 
you the same, and in no other month of 
the year, perhaps, is there as much time 
to give to it. If inventory has been 
rightly taken it has developed all the 
worthless and unsalable goods in the 
house. It now remains for us to get rid 
of them, and with many this is a sort of 
nightmare, while properly handled and 
displayed it is not a hard job at any 
time. Give them a table of their own : 
show them at their best, with a price 
that will move them, and if that price 
don't do it give them another. Lump 
them off to contractors, shopmen, fac- 
tories or what not. Sell them at some 
price, and you will have done the best 
job of the month, leaving you in good 
shape for the 11 months to follow. — 
H. C. W. in Iron Age. 

At Chatham, N.B., all the merchants, 
excepting two, have signed an agreement 
whereby they agree to close their places 
of business at 6 o'clock p.m. each week 
night, except Saturday, during the months 
of January, February and March. The 
above agreement took effect on MoikUiv, 
January fi, 1902. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



31 



W& have 
the nic- 
est set of Hose 
samples ever 
shown to the 
Canadian «jt 
trade. Don't 
fail to see 
them. 



HOSE 

GARDEN 

STEAM 

SUCTION 

ETC. 

Send for samples and quotations. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



\\^E make 
Hose of 
all kinds for all 
purposes. Our 
equipment is 
the most mod- 
ern and our 
goods are per 
fection. 




THE DURHAM RUBBER CO., limited 

Bowmanville, On*. 



e Dart Patent Union Couplings 

THE BEST ON THE MARKET. 




ADAPTED TO ALL USES. 



THE STANDARD F"OR 
RAILROAD AND 
LOCOMOTIVE SERVICI 




Bronze Metal Ground Joint Seats. 



The Fairbanks Company 



747 and 749 
Craig Street, 



Montreal. 



CANADIAN AGENTS. 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOSSIL FLOUR IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

IN Colchester county, Nova Scotia, lies 
Bass River Lake, resting almost on 
the mountain top, 1,340 feet above 
Cobeqtiid Bay. About 20 years ago this 
lake ran dry for a time, and then as 
mysteriously refilled again. But there was 
discovered between the various strata, 
lying on its rocky bed, a curious white, 
chalky substance, which was found to be 
indestructible, the most intense heat hav- 
ing no effect upon it, and insoluble, be 
sides being a non-conductor of heat. 

Various unsuccessful attempts were 
made to manufacture this, and it was r.ot 
till 1893 that a company consisting of 
capitalists from Portland, Providence, 
New York and Pennsylvania, was organ- 
ized to go on with the work of develop- 
ment. Davis S. Collins went to Nova 
Scotia to superintend the operations. A 
building 200 feet, two storeys and a half 
high was erected, in which was placed 
machinery, resembling that used in an 
ordinary Hour mill. Boilers and an en- 
gine were added, and a wooden tramway, 
12 mile? long, built from the works to 
the shore of Cobequid Bay. The lake was 
drained by means of trenches, and the 
work of getting at the substance which 
they propose to manufacture, began. The 
difficulty, however, of drying this mineral, 
which had puzzled many before, came up 
and the attempt almost failed. But by 
great energy, and persistence, new and 
special machinery was installed, and was 
found to work very successfully. That 
was in 1896. 

Large quantities of wood are required 
and large numbers of men are employed 
in cutting and hauling it, while about 50 
men are employed about the works dur- 
ing the summer, working day and night. 
The amount of money expended for labor 
exceeds §20,000 annually. 

Analysis of the product of the Bass 
River Lake and tests of its usefulness, 
made by Gray Stanton, a New York 
chemist and metallurgist, shows that the 
flour consists of boat-shaped diatoms. 
These diatoms differ in different deposits. 
Some deposits are in dead moors. The 
deposit used by The Fossil Flour Com 
pany is " live " and consequently is, ac- 
cording to the above-named expert, 
superior. Fossil-flour diatoms are of 
cellular formation. Those of whiting and 
zinc are hard and flat. Fossil flour 
grips, clinches, and is absorbent, insuring 
a single compound or material — not a 
mixture of two distinct articles — when 
used to assist in other manfacturcs. Fos- 
sil flour is absolutely neutral, and by 
means of the process of refinement noth- 
ing in the refined material is 'eft of 
animal or vegetable matter, it is a drug 
mechanically but not chemically. Four 
grades, comprising two varieties, are 
manufactured at Bass River, to which 
separate names are applied, viz., Fossil 
Flour and Tripolite. Practically they are 
the same except in color. The finest 
grade is a beautiful snowy white, and in 
this only one and fifteen-one-hundredth 
per cent, of impurity remains. 

Fossil flour is used for various purposes, 
as in making rubber compounds, in pro- 
ducing ultramarine dyes, as covering for 
steam pipes, boilers, etc., to prevent heat 
radiation ; it is made into silver polish 
of the finest quality ; also polish for 
tinware and the baser metals. New u>es 
are beintr discovered continually for this 
remarkable flour, and it is rapidly super- 
seding whiting and zinc. 

This industry is the only one of its 
kind known to be in existence. Last vear 



the profits of the company are stated to 
have been most satisfactory, and as 
enough of this deposit exists at the bot- 
tom of the lake to last CO years, doubt- 
less moii' extensive works will follow. 



THE ARSENIC INDUSTRY. 

THE only arsenic works in America 
are located at Deloro, Hastings 
County, Out. They have a capa- 
city of 1,000 tons per annum and employ 
from 16U to 180 men, their monthly pay- 
roll being $7,000, besides outlay for wood, 
timber, etc. This arsenic is of \ ery high 
quality. The refined product that is 
placed on the market by this company is 
said to be the purest in the world. Jt is 
and can be produced in Canada at less 
cost per ton than anywhere else in the 
world. This is only possible by reason of 
the gold contents in the ore from which 
the arsenic is eliminated. The gold value 
now goes towards paying the cost of 
mining and treating, but unless the 
arsenic also is extracted, the gold con- 
tents of the Hastings mispickel would 
not alone pay. 

On account of its low cost of produc 
tion there is a good chance for Canadian 
arsenic to displace the English and for- 
eign article in the markets of : Canada and 
the United States. Into the latter coun- 
try in 1900 there were imported 7,016,353 
lb. of arsenic ; value, $333,153. For the 
year 1899, 10,539,439 lb.; value, $415,066. 
In 1899 there were imported into the 
United States and Canada, 5,567 tons of 
arsenic. Canada, during the four years 
ending 1898, imported 2,224,783 lb., valued 
at S82,103. 

Since 1898 the Dominion users have 
purchased the Canadian product in in- 
creasing quantities instead of the foreign 
importations. The present import figures, 
then, would not indicate the consumption 
in this country. 



ACETYLENE GAS CASE. 

In the High Court, Toronto, on Mon- 
day, January 6 : Bowerman v. Town of 
Amherstburg.— Judgment (E.B.B.) in 
action tried at Sandwich, brought by 
plaintiff on behalf of himseff and other 
ratepayers and the Attorney-General for 
Ontario, to have declared invalid a reso- 
lution of the council of the corporation 
allowing defendant Fraser to lay metal 
pipes under the surface of certain streets 
to convey acetylene gas to his neighbors, 
to restrain defendant from laying pipes, 
and for a mandamus to defendant Fraser 
to restore the streets to their former 
state of repair. Held, that the council 
had power under the Municipal Act, sec. 
566 (3), as amended by 62 Vict. (0.), 
sec. 35, article (a8), to authorize defen- 
dant Fraser to lay the pipes, notwith- 
standing 1 Edw. VII., 26, sec. 24. The 
defendant Fraser is not supplying light 
for his own purposes only, but for muni- 
cipal and public purposes of the munici- 
pality, and the public see fit to avail 
themselves, so far as the streets in ques- 
tion are concerned. Held also, that the 
by-law passed pending the action and 
confirming the resolution is valid, 
though not signed by the mayor, R.S.O.. 
ch. 223, sec. 272, but the presiding officer 
who had power to sign. Action dis- 
missed without costs between plaintiff and 
defendants, or between defendants. A. 
H. Clarke (Windsor), for plaintiff. D. R. 
Davis (Amherstburg), and F. H. A. 
Davis (Amherstburg), for corporation. J. 
H. Rodd (Windsor), for defendant Fraser. 



THE 



PAINTERS 
PERFECT 
WHITE 
LEAD 



is beautifully soft and fine in 
the grain. It mixes well with 
LinseedOil, forming a creamy 
smooth paint of great cover- 
ing power and undoubted 
durability. Every atom is 
paint — perfect paint — and 
there is no loss or residue 
of any kind. The Painters 
Perfect White Lead has be- 
come very popular every- 
where. Book early to en- 
sure early shipment. 



THE 



CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY 



LIMITED 



Montreal and Toronto. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 



U 



MIDLAND 



JJ 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Pri cos to Sales Agents 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

or to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 



"The Peerless" 



is the best Bolster Spring ever 
produced. A fine line for the 



hardware trade. 



Wri te Us For Prices. 

c 




James Warnock & Co. 



Gait, Ont. 



CUHHENT JVIAHKET QUOTATIONS, 



January 17, 1902. 
These prices are for such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit., the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots, 10 J lb. 29 CO 30 00 

Tinplates. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright 

M.L.8., equal to Bradley. Per box 

I.C., usual sizes $6 75 

I.X., " 8 25 

I.X.X., " 9 75 

Famous— 

1.0 675 

I.X 8 25 

I.X.X 975 

Raven ft Vulture Grades— 

I.C., usual sizes 5 00 

I.X., " 6 CO 

I.X.X " - 7 00 

I.XXX.," 8 00 

D.O., 12%xl7 4 50 

D.X 5 25 

D.X.X 6 00 

Coke Plates— Bright 
Bessemer Steel — 

I. O. .usual sizes 4 25 

I Cspecial sizes, base 4 60 

20x28 900 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I 0., 20x28, 112 sheets 8 50 

I.X.,TerneTin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Pla 

Cookley Grade— Per lb. 
X X., 14x56, 50sheet bxs~) 

" 14x60, " \ .... 06% 

•' 14x65, " ) 

Tinned Sheets 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 07% 

" 26 " 08 

Iron and Steel. 

Common Bar, per lOOlbs.... 195 2 05 

Refined " " 2 45 

Horse Shoe Iron 2 40 

Hoop steel, 1% to 3 in. base, 

Sleigh Shoe Steel " base .... 2 10 

TireSteel 2 30 2 50 

Reeled Machinery 3 00 

Toe Calk Steel 2 85 3 00 

T Firth & Co's tool steel.per lb 12% 13 

Jessop's tool Steel .... 14 

Morton's tool steel C 12V4 13 

Black Diamond and " B.C," 

tool steel 10 11 

Chas Leonard's tool steel.... 08 09 

Drill Steel, per lb C8 10 

Boiler Tubes. 

1%-inoh 12% 

2 '• 13 

av4 •' '.'■ ° 15 

S " 16 

3V„ " ' ..; 20 

V* •- :::::::::::::..::..... .... 025 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

Winch 250 2 60 

i7l6inco 2 60 2 70 

% inoh and thioker 2 50 2 60 

Black Sheets. 

Com. D.F1. 

18gauge 2 85 3 00 

02* gauge 2 85 3 CO 

2 2 2 6 t0,4 " ::::::::::::;::: IU SS 

28 " 3 15 .... 



OanadaPlates. 

All dull, 52 sheets 3 00 

Half polished 3 10 

Allbright 3 75 

Black pipe— Iron Pipe. 

Per 1C0 Feet. 

% " 4 65 

% inch 3 40 

% " 345 

% " 3 70 

,% " 3 85 

1 " 5 40 

1% " 7 70 

i% " 9 20 

2 '• 12 50 

2% " 24 00 

3 " 28 

3% " 36 00 

4 " 43 00 

4% " 5r 00 

5 " 57 00 

6 " 73 00 

Galvanized pipe— 

% inch 5 15 

% •• 5 50 

1 " 7 95 

1% " ... 10 80 

1% " 12 95 

2 " 17 35 

5 p. c. oft* to preferred buyers. 
Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 
G O. Comet. Amer. Head. 

16 gauge 

18 to 24 gauge 4 C.'. 3 75 .... 4 C5 

26 " 4 25 4 00 .... 4 25 

28 " 4 50 4 25 .... 4 50 

Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 

28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 

Chain. 

Proof Coil, 3-16 in., per 1001b 

% " 7 85 8 10 

5-16 " '" 4 95 5 25 

% '• " 4 £5 4 60 

" 7-16 " " 4 15 4 40 

% " " 4 00 4 25 

9-16 " " 3 90 4 15 

% " " 3 80 4 05 

$ ' ' " 3 85 4 10 

Halter kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 

5 p.o. 

Cow ties 40p.c. 

Tie-out chains 65p.c. 

StallfixtureB 35p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.o. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, dis- 
count 35 p c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

Copper. 

Ingot Per 100 lb. 

English B.S., ton lots 15 00 

Lake Superior 

Bars. 
Cut lengthsround, % to % in. 23 ro 25 CO 
" round and square 

1 to 2 inches.... 23 00 25 00 
Sheet. 
Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz. ,14x48 and 14x60 24 00 24 50 

Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., irregular sizes 24 50 25 00 

Tinned copper sheets 2b CO 

Planished -,VV ."V " U0 

Braziers (In sheets.) 

4x6ft. 25 to 30 lbs. ea., per lb 25 

'■ 35 to 45 " " •••• 24 

" 50-lb. and above, " .... 23 

Boiler and T.K.Pitts 

Plain TiDned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb ° 32 

Copper Ware. 
Discount, 50 per cent. 

Brass. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge 10 per oent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 23 

Tubing, base. per b... .... 23% 



Zine Spelter 

Foreign, perlb 0(5% 06 

Domestio " 

Zinc Sheet. 

5-cwt. casks 6 CO 6 25 

Partcasks 06 06% 

Lead. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb .. 3 50 3 7^ 

Bar.l lb "" 05 

Sheets, 2% lbs. sq. ft., by .... 06% 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs., " .... 06 

Note.— Cut sheets % cent per lb. extra. 
Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard,lists 
at 7c. per lb. and 35 p.c. dis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
J-ft. lengths lists at 7% cents. 
Shot. 

Common, $6.50 per 100 lb. ; chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb. ; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 22% p.c. Prioes are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 ner cent, cash, freights equalized. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 

Discount, 60 and 10 per cent, on medium and 
extra heavy, and 60 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Per lb. Perlb. 

Bar half-and-half, guarant'd .... 19 

Bar half-and-half, commer'l .... 18% 

Refined 18 

Wiping 17% 

Antimony. 

Cookson's, per lb 10 11 

White Lead . Per 100 lb. 

Pure 5 87% 

No.l 5 50 

No.2 5 12% 

No.3 4 75 

No.4 4 37% 

Munro's Select Flake White 6 37y s 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 6 12% 

Brandram's B B. Genuine 8 25 

" No. 1 7 50 

Above prices are for 25 lb. and upwards. 
Bed Lead. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $4 75 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 00 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 4 25 

No. 1,1001b. kegs, perewt 4 50 

White Zinc. 

Extra Red Seal 06 08 

No.l 05% C7 

No.2 05 06 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, casks 5 25 

Pure, kegs 5 50 

No. 1, casks 5 CO 

No.l.kegs 5 25 

Prepared Paints. 
In %, % and 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 125 

Second qualities,per gallon 110 

Barn (inbbls.) 60 90 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 1 40 

Canada Paint Co's Pure 125 

Toronto Lead & Color Co's Pure.... 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 20 
Colors in Oil. 
25 lb. tins, Standard Qualify. 

Venetian Red, per lb 04% 06 

Chrome Yellow 12 14 

Golden Ochre 08 10 

French " 06 

MarineBlack 09 

ChromeGreen 10 

French Imperial Green 12 

Sign Writers' Black 16 

Burnt TJmbt r 11 

" Sienna 11 

R«w Umber 11 

" Sienna 11 



Colors, Dry. 

Common Ochre bbls 120 130 

Yellow Ochre J.F.L.S.), bbls ... 2 ou 

Yellow Ochre (La Belle) 1 15 1 25 

Brussels Ochre J 00 

Venetian Red (best), bbl 1 75 2 00 

English Oxides, per owt 3 00 3 25 

Amerioan Oxides, bbls 125 2 00 

Canadian Oxides, 1 blB 125 175 

Super MagnetioOxides,93p.o. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt Sienna, pure, perlb 10 

" Umber, " " 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Black, pure 09 

Chrome Yellows, pure 18 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb. 0(8 10 

Golden Ocbre 04 <)5 

Ultramarine Blue in 28-lb.. 

boxes, per lb 06 18 

Fire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb 100 

Genuine Eng.Litharge, perlb 07 

Mortar Color, per 1001b 125 150 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45 lb. 18 10 

Whiting, bbl 55 60 

English Vermillion in 50-lb. bags. 95 

Paris Green. per lb. 

Petroleum Casks \&/. 

ArseD ic Kegs 17 

50-lb. and lui'-lb. drums ...'..! 11V. 

2i-lb. drums jg 

lib packages .... }gy 

%-lb. do 20% 

Mb. tins iqtf 

%-ib do ::;;;;;; 21% 

F.O.B. Montreal. Terms— 3 p. c. off 30 
days, or 4 mos. from date of de'ivery. 
Bine Stone. 

Casks, for spraying, per lb 07 

100-lh. lots, do. per lb 08 

Pntty. 

Bulk in bbls 1 gp 

Bulk in less quantity ,, 3 05 

Bladders in bbls j 25 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose. .... 2 40 

Bladders in 25-lb. tins 2 35 

Bladders in 12%-lb. tins 2 65 

Bladders in bulk or tine less than 1001b2 90 
Varnishes. 
In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. net. 

Carriage, No. 1 150 160 

Pale Durable body 4 10 4 25 

" rubbing 2 85 3 00 

Gold Size, Japan 2 85 3 00 

No. 1 Brown Japan 85 

Elastic Oak j 50 

Furniture, extra 125 

" No. 1 85 

Hard Oil Finish 165 175 

LightOil Finish 1 40 1 60 

Demar 1 70 1 80 

Shellac, white 2 3' 2 45 

" orange 2 25 2 35 

Turpentine Brown Japan 1 25 

" Black Japan 85 90 

" " No. 1.. 70 75 

Elastilite Varnish 1 gal. can, each, $3.00. 
Granitine Floor Finish per gal., $2.75. 
Maple Leaf Coach Enamels ; Size 1, $1 20 
Size 2, 70c. ; Size 3, 40c. each. 
Castor Oil. 

East India, in cases, per lb. . 0(9% 10 

" " small lots 10 10% 

Cod Oil, Etc. 

CodOilpergal 50 55 

Pure Olive 120 

" Neatsfoot 90 

Glne. 

Common 08% 08 

French Medal 14 14'/, 

Cabinet sheet 12 

White, extra 18 

Gelatine 22 30 

Strip 18 

Coopers 19 

Hutlner 



34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE ANu METAL 



THOS. GOLDSWORTHY & SONS 

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

Cloth "* 
Corn 

Flour 



EMERY I 



We carry all numbers of Corn and Flour Emery in io-pound packages, from 8 to 140, 
in stock. Emery Cloth, Nos. OO., O., F., FF., 1 to 3. 

JAMES HUTTON & CO., Wholesale Agents for Canada, Montreal, 



HARDWARE. 

Ammunition. 

Cartridges. 

B. B Caps Dom. 50 and 5 per cent 

Rim Firo Pistol, dis. 40 p. o., Amer. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5 p. o. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, 10 p. c. Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes Dom. 
30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 per cent. 

Central Fire. Military and Sporting, Amer. 
add 5 p.c. to list. B. B. Caps, discount 40 
per cent. Amer. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap and 
" Dominion " grades, 25 per cent. • Rival 
and Nitro, 10 p c. advance on list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dam., 30 percent.; American, $1.60. 
Wads per lb. 

Best thick white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bags 1 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

y,-lb.bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxeB 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 
each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 1C gauges 70 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 1 10 

Superior ohemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 

Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 10% 

Hay Buddeo, 80-lb. and over .... 09'4 

Brooks, " " " .... 11% 

Angers. 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 p.c. off list. 
Axes. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit, perdoz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 1100 18 00 

Beach Axes, 40 p.c. 

Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boy'B Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

HandledAxes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Best quality 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tnbs. 

Zinc •• •■•• ;•••,. 6 00 

Copper, discount 15 p.c. off revised list 

Baths. 

Standard Enameled. 

5%-inoh rolled rim, 1st quality 25 00 

™ ' 2nd " 21 00 

Antl-Frlctlon Metal. 

"Tandem" A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

O " 011% 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 

Frictionless metal, per lb 23 

SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. 

Aluminum, genuine 41 

Dynamo 27 

Special ••• ■•• JJ '■{ 

Aluminum, 99 p.c pure "Syracuse .. 45 
Phosphonne anti-friction metal .... 25 
Bells. 
Hand. 
BraBS, 60 per oent. 
Mukel, 55 per oent. 



Cow. 
American make, disoount 66% per oent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', disoount 45 per oent. 
Farm. 

American , each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, perdoz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 percent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 60 percent. 
Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 
No. 1, not wider than 6 io., 90 10 and 10 p.c. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 p c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen. , net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 percent 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, per gross.'... 2 25 5 20 
Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07% 12 

Bolts and Nuts . Percent. 

Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list) — 55 and 5 

" full square ($2.40 list) 60 and 5 

" " Norway iron ($3 list) . 60 and 5 

Maohine Bolts, all sizes 55 and 5 

Plough Bolts 55 and 5 

Blank Bolts 60 

Bolt Ends 60 

Sleigh Shoe BoltB 70 

Coach Screws, cone point 70 

Nuts, square, all sizes 3%c per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes 4c. per lb. off. 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6o. 

Nuts, in 50 lb. lo's '/4c. p?r lb extra in less 
than 50 lb lots, %c. extra. 

Boot Calks. 
Small and medium, ball, per M.... 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 62% percent. 

Broilers . 
Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dls., 65 to 67% percent. 
Vegetable, per doz., diB. 37% per cent. 

Henis, No. 8 , " 6 00 

Henis, No. 9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers' Cleavers. 

German, perdoz 6 00 1100 

Amerioan, perdoz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Tarred felt, per 100 lb 170 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 lb. 

per roll 8) 

Realy roofing, 3-plv, not under 65 lb. 

per roll 1 10 

Carpet f«lt. per ton 45 00 

Dry sheathing, per roll, 400 sq ft 35 

Tar sheathing, " " " 45 

Dry fibre 55 

Tarred fibre, " " "... f5 

O.K. AI.XL., 70 

Resin-sized. " " " 41 

Oiledsheatih g " 600 " 110 

" 400 " 70 

R of coating in birrels, per gal 17 

" small packages 25 

Ren- ed tar, per barrel 4 50 

Coal tar, " 4 00 

Coal tar, less than ba'rela. per gal... 15 

Roofing pit h, per 100 lb 85 

Bull Rings. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass net revised 1st, 



Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis. , 60 per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per ce at. 
Loose Pin, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per nt. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

Amerioan, perdoz 100 150 

Bullard's, per doz 6 50 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% percent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, per gross 8 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 25 2 75 

English " 3 00 3 15 

Belgian " 2 50 2 75 

Canadian hydraulio 125 150 

Chalk. 
Carpenters Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per owt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon, per gross 14 18 

Chisels. 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Warnock's, dis. 70 percent. 
P. S. & W. Extra 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 

Churns. 
Revolving Churns, metal frames— No.0,$8— 
No. 1, $8.50— No. 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00— 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames— 20c. each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 56 
p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 54 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p. c. cash in 30 days. 
Clips. 
Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets Net. 

Plain York or Ontario Syphon Jet. $9 60 
Emb. York or Ontario Syphon Jet. 10 20 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Elgin orTeu. Syphon Washout 6 00 
Emb. ElgiDor Teu. Syphon Washout 6 60 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonio, plain 9 60 
" " " " emb. 10 20 

Plain Richelieu 4 00 

Emb. Richelieu 4 25 

Connections 1 25 

Low Down Oat. Sy. Jet, plain 1170 

" " ' emb'd 12 30 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins P.O., 14 in 70 

" oval, 17 x 14 in 150 

" " 19x15 in ... 2 25 

Compasses, Dividers, Etc. 
American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 

Cradles, Grain. 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per cent. 
Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. & D.,No. 3, perpair 17% 

" 5, " 22% 

6, " 15 

Boynto pattern " 20 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.c. ) 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 1 60 

Knglish, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 

Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per cent. 
Drills. 
Hand and Breast. 
Millar's Falls, perdoz. net list. 
DRILL BITS. 
Morse, dis., 37% to 40 per cent. 
Standard dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

Faucets. 
Common, cork-lined, dis. 35 per cent. 

ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) per doz 

5 and 6-inch, common 1 20 

7-inch 1 35 

Polished, 15o. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 45 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 



FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 
FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 70 and 10 per cent. 

Arcade 70 " 10 " 

Kearney * Foot 70 " 10 " 

Difston's 70 " 10 " 

American 70 " h " 

J. Barton Smith 7" " 10 " 

McClellan 70 " 10 

Eagle 70 " 10 " 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 61. 10 and 5 

Royal 80 " 

Globe 70 to 75 

Black Diamond, 61) and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 p.c 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 
NicholsoD File Co 's "Simplicity" file handle, 
per gross, R5c. to $1.50. 

GLASS— Window— Box Price. 



Star 


D. Diamond 


Size United Per Per 


Per 


Per 


Inches. 50 ft. 100 ft 


50 ft. 


100 ft 


Under26 2 20 4 25 




6 25 


26 to 40 2 40 4 65 




6 75 


41to50 5 10 




7 50 


51to60 5 35 




8 50 


61to70 5 75 




9 70 


71 to 80 6 2) 




11 00 


81to85 7 00 




12 55 


86to90 7 75 




15 00 


91 to 95 




17 50 


96 to 100 




20 50 


101tol05 




24 00 


K6toll0 




27 51 


GAUGES 






Marking, Mortise, 1 


Btc. 




Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 




Wire Gauges. 






Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, each. . . 


1 65 


2 40 


HALTERS. 












" %to»4 




9 00 




14 00 




S 87% 


4 00 


" lViin., " 


5 15 


5 20 




1 87 


2 45 


HAMMERS. 






Nail 






Maydole's, dis. 5 to 10 per cent 


.. Can. 


dis. 


25 to 27% per cent. 






Taok. 








I 10 


1 20 


Sledge. 








07% 


08 % 


Ball Pean. 






English and Can., per lb 


22 


25 


HANDLES. 








1 50 


2 00 




1 00 


1 50 


Fork. 






C. 4 B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 




Hoe. 






C. ft B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. 


ist. 




Saw. 








1 00 


1 25 


Plane. 








3 15 


3 75 


Hammer and Hatchet. 




Canadian, 40 percent. 






Cross-Out Saws 








13* 
doz. ] 




HANGERS. 


pairs. 




5 85 


6 00 


Stearns, 4 inch 


5 00 






6 50 


Lane's covered- 










8 40 


No. 11%, 10-ft.run 




10 80 






12 60 


No. 14, 15-ft. run 




21 00 


Lane's O.N.T. track, per foot. 




4% 


HARVEST TOOLS. 




Disoount, 70 per cent. 






HATCHETS. 






Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cen 





CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



35 



USE PHOSPHORINE ANTI-FRICTION METAL 



It is tho new dis- 
ouery. Ask for 
particulars. 

It is ths only 
Anti-Friction 
Metal known to be 
chemically pure. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nickle, etc., always in stock. 



CANADIAN WORKS, MONTREAL, P.Q. 
AMERICAN " SYRACUSE, NY. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 06% 

" " 5-in., " .... 06k 

" " 6-in., " .... 06 

" " 8-in., " .... 0534 

" " 10-in., " .... 05% 

Light T and strap, dis. 65 and 5 per cent. 
Sorew hook and hinge — 

6 to 10 in., per 100 lbs 4 25 

12 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 25 

Per gro. pairs. 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 
Garden, Mortar, etc, dis. 50 and lOp.o. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Disoount, 45 and 5 per cent. 

HOOKS. 
Oast Iron. 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 1 00 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can dis 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, disoount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Sorew, bright, dis. 55 per cent. 

HORSE NAILS. 
"C'brand 50 and 7%P.coff new lUf) Oval- 
"M" brand 50, 10 and 5 per cent. J head 
Countersunk. 60 percent. 

HORSESHOES 

P.O.B. Montreal. 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 
Light, medium, and heavy... 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes , 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 60 3 85 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

P.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Ouelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 p c. off list, June 1899 
ICE PICKS. 

Star per doz 3 03 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.c. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lb 30 50 

American. 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.c. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Can., dis., 45 p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. pergross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz — 6 00 9 00 
Shutter, porcelain, F. & L. 

screw, per gross 130 4 00 

White door knobs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 

L4MP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

V*0old Blast, per doz 7 00 

No. 3 "Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 00 

No. 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

Allglass 120 130 

LINES. 

Fish pergross 105 2 50 

Chalk " 190 7 40 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

Russel ft Erwin, per doz 3 00 3 25 

Cabinet, 
agle, dis. 30 p.c. 



Padlock 
Englishand Am. perdoz.... 50 6 00 
Scandinavian, " .... 100 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 20 to 25 p.c 

MACHINE SCREWS. Iron and Brass. 
Flat head discount 25 p.c 
Round Head discount 20 p.c. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' perdoz 1 25 1 50 

Carpenters', hickory, per doz 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulking each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian, per doz 5 50 6 50 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 
Discount, 25 per cent. 

NAILS. 
Quotations are : Cut. Wire. 

2d and 3d 83 3 E . $3 55 

3d 3 00 3 22 

4and5d 2 75 3 05 

6and7d 2 65 2 !0 

8and9d 2 50 2 70 

10andl2d 2 45 2 65 

16and20d 2 40 2 60 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 35 2 55 

Wire nails in carlots are $2.50 
Galvanizing 2c. per lb. net extra. 
Steel Cut Nails 10c. extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. !5 p.c 
Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barrel nails, dis. 25 per cent 
NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 185 3 50 

NAIL SETS 
Square, round, and octagon 

pergross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

POULTRY NETTING. 
2-in. Mesh, 19 w.g., dis. 61 p.c. 
2-in. M( sh, 18 w.g. and heav er, 50 and 10 p.o. 
OAKUM. Per 100 lb. 

Navy 6 00 

U. S.Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

WaterWhite(U.S.) 16% 

Prime White (U.S) 15% 

Water White (Can.) 15 

Prime White (Can.) 14 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model gal van. oil 
can , with pump, 5 gal. , 

per doz 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, perdoz 125 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable ,dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dufferin pattern pails, dis. 45 p.c 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 40 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, dis. 40 p.c 
6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails, dis. 40 p.o. 
Creamer cans, dis. 40 p.c. 
PICKS. 

Perdoz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelainhead, per gross 175 3 00 

Brass head " ... 40 1 00 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 
PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian dis. 40 per cent. 

American dis. 50. 
Wood, fanoy Canadian or American 7% 
to 40 per oent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English, per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 
Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.o. 
Button'B Imitation, perdoz.. 5 00 9 00 
German, perdoz 60 2 60 



PLUMBERS' BRASS GOODS. 
Standard Compression work, dis. 60 p.c. 
"J.M.T." Cushion work, dis. £0 p.c. 
Fuller work, dis. 65 p.c. 
6 doz. lots an 1 over of the above, extra dis 

10 p c. 
Rough Stops and Stops and Wa hers, dis. 

60 p o. With, in lot? of 2 doz. and over, 

an extra dis. of 10 p.c. 
"J.M.T.'' Globe, Agnle and Check Valves, 

dis 55 p.o. 
Standard Glooe, Angle and Check Valves, 

dis. 60 d.c. 
"J.M.T," Radiator Valves, dis. 55 p c. 
Standard " ' dis., 60 p.c. 

Patent Quick Ojpening Valve?, dis. 65 p.c. 

and 10 p c 
No. 1 compression bath cock, net . . 2 00 

No. 4 ' 2 00 

No. 7, Fuller's 2 20 

No 4%, ' " • 2 35 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

cock, hot and cold, perdoz. 15 00 

Patent Comprepsion Cushion, bath 

ccck, No. 2208 2 25 

POWDER. 
Velox Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 

'001b. or less 85 

1,000 lb. or more 80 

Net 30 days. 
PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount i5 per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz 55 100 

Axle 22 33 

Screw 27 1 00 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 180 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 100 185 

Conductors'* ' 9 00 15 00 

Tinners', solid.per set 00 72 

•' hollow pei inch 00 100 

RANGE BOILERS. Net. 

Dominion, 35 " 6 75 

40 " 7 75 

Ronald's Galvanized, 30 gallons — 6 50 

35 " .... 7 50 

" " 40 " .... 8 50 

Copper, 30 gallons 25 00 

" 35 " 29 00 

" 40 " S3 00 

RAKES. 
Wood, 10 per oent. 

RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Elliot's * 00 18 0C 

Geo. Butler* Co.'s 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 1100 

" King Cutter 12 50 50 00 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile & Quack's 7 00 12 00 

REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 pe cent 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 

and 10 per cent. 
Iron Burrs, discount 55 per cent. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. oartons , %c. 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, lc 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets * Burrs, 35 and 5 p.c. dis. 

and cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets 
%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
RIVET SETS 
Canadian dis. 35 to 37% percent. 
ROPE ETC. 

Sisal 12 

Pure Manilla 16 

"British" Manilla 13% 

Cotton, 3-16inch and larger 16 

' ' 5-32 inch 21 

" %inch 22% 

Russia Deep Sea 15% 

Jute 8 

Lath Yarn 10% 



RULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p,c. 

SAD IRONS. per set. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished 65 

" No. 50, nickle-plated 75 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% pe cent. 
B & A. sand, 40 and 5 per cent. 
Emery, 40 per cent. 
Garnet ( Rurton's), 5 to 10 p. c. advance on list. 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. . . 9 50 

SAWS. 
Sand Disston's, dis.12% p.c. 
S. & D.. 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per ft.... 35 55 
S. & D., dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2and3. 

Hack, complete, each 75 £ 75 

1 rame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 2 25 2 50 

Solid, " 1 75 2 00 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 23 30 

SAW SETS. 
"Lincoln'and Whiting, per doz... 4 75 
HandSeis, No. 1 Woodyatt (Morrill) 4 25 
X-cut sets , No. 3 Woodyatt (Morrill) 9 50 

SCALES. 
Standard, 45 p.c 
Champion, 55 p.c 
Spring Balances, 10 p.c 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 
" Dominion, 55 p.c. 

" Richelieu, 55 p.c. 

Warren's new Standard 45 p.c. 
" " Champion C5 p.c. 
SCREW DRIVERS- 

Sargent's per doz 65 100 

SCREWS 
Wood, P. H. , bright and steel, 87% and 10 p.c 
Wood R. H., " dis. 82% and 10 p.o. 

" F. H., brass dis. 80 and 10 p.o. 
Wood.R. H., " dis. 75 and 10 p.c 
" F.H., bronze, dis. 75 p.c 
" E.H. " 70 p.c. 

Drive Screws , 87% and 10 per oent. 

Bench , wood, per doz 3 25 4 00 

" iron, " 4 25 5 75 

Set, Case hardened, 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, 50 and 5 per oent. 
Hexagon Cap, 45 per cent. 

SCYTHES. 
Per doz, net 9 01 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS. 
Bailey Cutlery Co., full nickeled, dis. 60 p.c. 
Seymour's, dis. 50 and 10 p.o. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 percent. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 percent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1150 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, 1% lb. , per lb 37 

2 lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, perdoz 2 40 2 55 

" Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 60. 10 and 5 p.c. 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.c 
STAMPED WARE. 
Plain, dis. , 75 and 12% p.c. off revised list 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 50 4 00 

Plain 3 25 3 75 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 



36 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PITTSBURGH, 

U. S. A. 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF" 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

CHAIN 

Proof Coil, B.B., B.B.B., Crane, Dredge Chain, Trace Chains, Cow Ties, etc. 

ALEXANDER GIBB, PotlQ(1 i Q „ p™™.™^*,™ A. C. LESLIE & CO., 

Mnntrflai ' -Canadian Representatives- Montreal> 



OF ALL KINDS. 



Montreal. 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 



For otber Provinces. 



STOCKS AND DIES. 
American dis. 25 p.c. 

STONE. Per lb. 

Washita 28 60 

Hindoatan 06 07 

" slip 09 09 

Labrador 13 

Axe 15 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas 00 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind.2in,40 to 200 lb.per ton .... 25 00 

" under 40 lb. " 28 00 

Grind, under 2 in. thick " .... 29 00 

STOVE PIPES. 

5 and 6 inch Per 100 lengths 7 00 

7 inch " " .... 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 
No. 4— 3 dozen in case.net cash .... #4 80 
No. 6— 3 dozen in case, " .... 8 40 
TACKS BRADS, ETC. 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80 & 12% 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned ... .85 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 & 15 

" " tinned 80 & 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cat tacks, blued, in dozens only . .80 

" % weights 60 

Swedes cut, tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80&10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk. . . .85, 12% & 12% 
" bruah, blued & tinned, bulk. .70 
" gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 & 12% 

Zino tacka 35 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

Copper tacka 50 

Copper nails 55% 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 



Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

Lining tacks, in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin capped trunk nails 25 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

•' " " bulk 40 

TAPE LINES. 
English, ass skin, per doz.. . . 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Gheaterman'a each 90 2 85 

" steel, each .... 80 8 00 

THERMOMETERS. 
Tin case-and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.o. 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, dis. 25 p.c. 
Game, H. & N., P. 8. 4 W., 65 p.o. 
Game, steel, 72%, 75 p.o. 

TROWELS. 
Disstons discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

S. & IX, discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 18% 

" 4-Ply 23% 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, " 27 35 

VISES. 

Wright's 13% 

Brook's 12 5 4 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

" " " No 2 5 50 

Saw Vise 4 50 9 00 



ENAMELLED WARE. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 

SMOOTH ST«IL WIRE. 

No. 0-9 gauge .$2 60 

10 " 6c. e ■ tra. 

11 " 12c. " 

12 " 20c. " 

13 " 303. " 

14 " 40c " 

15 " 55c. " 

16 " 70c. " 

Acid 60c. for coppering and $2 for tinning 
Eitraa net per 103 lb. —Oiled wire 10c, 

spring v. ire $1 .55, special hay baling wire 30c. 
beat 8teel wire 75c, bright s"ft drawn 15c, 
charcoal (extra quality) $1.25, pa keel in 
casks or cases 15c, bagging and papering 
10c, 50 and 1001b. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. 
bundles 15c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in 
lib. hanks 50c, in %-lb. hanks 75c, in %-lb. 
hanks $1. 

Fine Steel Wire, dis. 22% per cent. 
List of extras : In 100-lb. lots : No. 
17, $5-No. 18, $5.50-No. 19, $6-No. 20, 
86.65-No. 21, $7— No. 22, $7.30— No. 23, 
7.65 -No. 24, $8-No. 25, $9-No. 26 
89.50— No. 27, 810-No. 28, $11 No. 29. 
«12-No. 30, 813— No. 31,$14-No. 32 $15, 
No. 33, $16— No. 34, $17. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31 
$4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 5c— oil, 
ing, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles, 15c— in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
in %-lb. hanka, 75c— in %-lb. hanks, $1— 
packed in casks or cases, 15c. — bagging or 
papering, 10c 



Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per oent. off the 
list. 

Copper wire, 45 and 10 per cent, net cash 30 
days, f.o.b. factory. 

Galvanized Wire, per 100 lb. -Nos. 6,7,8, $3.50 
to $3 85— No. 9, $2.85 to $3.15— No. 10 
$3.60 to $3.95— No. 11, $3.70 to $4.10-No 
12, $3 to $3.30— No. 13, $3.10 to $3.40- 
No. 14, $4.10 to $4.50— No. 15, $4.60 to 
85.05— No. 16. 84.85 to 85 35. Base aizes, 
Nos. 6 to 9 $2.52% f.o b. Cleveland. 

Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand. No. 17, 
$4.65; No. 18, 02.90; No. 19, $2.60. Hol- 
low 6 strand, No. 17, $«.3n; No. 18. $2.70 
No. 19, $2.35; No 20, $2.30, f.o.b. Hamil 
ton.Toronto, Montreal. 

WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 3 00 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 00 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.77% 
in less than carlots, and $2.65 in carlots 
WIRE CLOTH. 

Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft., net.. 1 25 
WASTE COTTON. per lb. 

Colored 6 

White 8 

WRENCHES. 
Acme, 35 to 37% per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe'e Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

TowerB' Engineer, each 2 00 7 00 

" S., per doz 5 80 6 00 

G. ft K-'s Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell'a Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket , per doz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian.. " 24 00 

Royal American., " .... 24 00 

Sampson " 24 00 

Xerma 4 months, or 3 p.c. 30 days. 
WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 
Canadian make, discount, 40 per cent. 



ADVERTISING inWESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG CANADA. 

THE PARCELL t^ScVISales 

Highly Endorsed by Government Inspectors. 




Designed for Farm, Mill, Factory and Warehouse uses. 
Ask your Wholesale Dealer for cuts and prices, or write 

AYLMER IRON WORKS CO,, Limited, AYLMER, ONT. 



DIAMOND VISE AND DRILLING ATTACHMENT 



TJ. S. Patent Jan. 15, '95. Canadian Patent July 22, '95. 



U-Extends To 12 Inches. -*| 

■ iSmalljawCan Be Set AT ,fc 
r a g y « Anv Positio n >» 

ifiiji jiiajtia4i]jii^^ 



JAWS are faced with steel % inch wide, 4 inches long, 
firmly fastened to jaw, checked and hardened. 

VISE weighs 38 pounds. DRILL weighs 13 pounds. 

For Sale by Jobbers of Hardware. 

Made by— 

The Adams Company, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
Made by A. R. Woodyatt & Co., Guelph, Ont. 




PANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 






Montreal. 

Watch our ad. in next issue, or write to us for 
particulars on our patented 

Automatic Door Strip and Weather Strip 

Specially adapted for cold climates and takes 
the place of the inner window. 

HELMS & HELMS, 148-50 wniow st., 






PHILADELPHIA. 





When placing your order for 

WRAPPING PAPERS 

place it with 
these mills and then you will be 
sure — whether brown or manilla 
papers — that quality is good — that 
trlPpaper counts full 480 sheets to 
the ream — and is full weight always. 

— We have a good name /or 

— promptness in all letter orders. 

CANADA PAPER CO , Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL 



Lockerby & McGomb 

AGENTS IN CANADA 

FOR THE 

Celebrated P. & B. 

Cold Storage Lining 



AND 



. . Ruberoid Roofing . . 

P. S. --Prices on Application. 

65 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 



"BAILEY" BRAND CUTLERY 



SURPASSES ALL OTHER MAKES 



WRITE FOR 
CATALOGUE. 




FULLY WARRANTED. 



Shears, Scissors, Razors, and Butcher Knives, made by 

B^ILIEr^ CUTLEET" CO. 

BRANTFORD, ONT. Limited 



CHAS. F. CLARK, President. 



JARED CHITTENDEN Treasurer. 



...ESTABLISHED 1849.. 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices : Nob. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results mayjustify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized 
world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



HALIFAX, N.S. 
OTTAWA. ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



OFFICES IN CANADA- 
HAMILTON, ONT. LONDON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. ST. JOHN, N.B. 
VICTORIA, B.C. WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C. IRVING, Gen, Man, Western Canada, Toronto. JOHN A. FULTON, Gen. Man, Eastern Canada, Montreal. 




Sit. INS 




1 



Ine.1896 



Black Diamond File Works 

G. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve ^^^^*<*. Medals 




Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 




1902 





[ t 1902 



We manufacture the most popular and best 
selling lines of Garden Hose in Canada. Our "Mal- 
tese Cross" brand we confidently recommenu as 
the finest Garden Hose on the market. 

We have other grades not quite so expensive, 
but good reliable brands, viz. : "Lion" (the popular 
medium-priced hose), "King" 4 Sun" and "Leader." 

Our " Kinkproof " (wire wound) hose is wired 
by a special process controlled solely by ourselves, 
and is so constructed that it may be cut at any 
wind of the wire without loosening or uncoiling, 
the wire being self-gripping throughout each 
length. 



The Gutta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Cd. 



OF TORONTO. LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms 
45-47-49 West Front St. 



>*>%r%r^»r^%^%/%/%/%/%^%/V%/%/»>%%/%/%/»%>« 



Factories- 



I 15-165 West Lodge Ave 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



TORONTO, 

CANADA. 



BRITISH MANUFACTURED 

CASTOR OIL 



" n. O. M. CO." Brand. 

Cold Drawn Pharmaceutical, 
First Pressure, 
Second Pressure. 



From stock and to import. In barrels, 
and cases — 2 tins each. Special prices for 
import orders. 



B. ft S. H. THOMPSON & CO, 

28 St. Sulpice St., MONTREAL, 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Housellne 
Hambroline 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Seallne 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shlngleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlin 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



"RED THREAD" Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila*-, 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 

»■ Limited 

Western Ontario Representative— 

wm. b. stewart. MONTREAL, QUE. 

Tel 94. 27 Front St. West, TORONTO. 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heatinq, Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JANUARY 25, !902 



NO. 4. 




\ CUTLERY/ 



FOR SALE BY LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES. 



Lysaght's Black Sheets 

"Queen's Head" CR.CA.— Highest grade, dead flat. 
"Southern CPOSS" CRC.A — First class quality, 
dead flat. 

"Southern CPOSS" C A.— Same sheets, not dead flat. 
Electrical Sheets, Tack Sheets, etc., etc. 
No common sheets made. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL, 
BRISTOL, ENG. Managers Canadian Branch. 



Where "SAf FORD" b 




The Safford Radiators are dispensing comfort in every 
quarter of the globe. Here are a few buildings where 
they're doing it this very moment : 

His Majesty's Theatre, London. 

His Majesty's Offices and Works, Birmingham. 

His Majesty The Emperor of Germany's Royal Palace, Berlin, Germany. 

Institute of Mechanical Engineers, Storey's Gate, Westminster. 

Metropolitan Police Headquarters, Scotland Yard, London. 

Palace Hotel, Cairo, Egypt. 

City Hall, Antwerp, Belgium. 

City Hall, Pietermaritzberg, S. Africa. 

Exploration Buildings, Johannesburg, S. Africa. 

That's only a few of the world's material recommendations 
for the " Safford." 



The "Safford" is a radiator for hot water and steam heating. 
It's easily handled — made without bolts or packing. If you 
haven't our catalogue write to us. If you wish to see our 
representative let us know — we will be with you next day. 



THE DOMINION RADIATOR COY, u-im 

Head Office, Dufferin St., TORONTO 



FELT 



Weather Strip 



DOORS : WINDOWS. 



FOOT WARMERS 

RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



Cor. King and Victoria Streets. .^^TORON 



I COPPER I 



Bar, Ingot Sheet, Tubing. 3 

I 

Samuel. Sons & Ben jamin, London and Liverpool, Eng. ^X 

M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Co. | 

£ General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants. ^ 

§ 3 

I 27 Wellington St. West, ^.TORONTO, ONT. | 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



James Cartland & Son 

Manufacturers of every description of Limited 

CABINET, BUILDERS', FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND. 



C.R.Co. Star 




London Showrooms: 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 




RED RUBBER PACKING 

FOR HIGH-GRADE WORK 



Good Packing Good Price 



Good Profits 



Good Advertising Matter 



Send for samples, prices and advertising matter. 



The Canadian Rubber Co. 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 




Our "YANKEE" Tool Book 
tells all about them. Mailed 
free on application 



No. 15. "Yankee Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 




^c ,:i; 



No. 30 "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




No. 41. "Yankee" Automatic Drill," Eight Drill Points In Handle. 




Manufacturers also oi 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chlppers. 
Fluting Machines, 

Hand Fluters. 



No. 50. "Yankee " Reciprocating Drill, for Iron, Steel, Brass, Wood, eto. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 




No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 

Screw Driver. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




*£ Australasian ^ 
Hardware and Machinery, 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
and Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 

post free to any part of the world. 



PUBLISHING OFFICES : 

Melbourne 
Sydney, 

AMERICAN OFFICES: 

New York, 

BRITISH OFFICES: 

London, - 



Fink's Buildings. 

Post Office Chambers. 

Park Row Building. 



- 43 Cannon St., E.C. 
Specimen Copies on application. 



I 



THE LIGHTING BUSINESS OF CANADA 

We are after the lighting business of Canada. We have 
a liberal share of it already, but we are always onen for 
more. We want 1902 to be a 
record maker. We have the best 
lights and our terms and prices are 
right. 

OUR LEADERS 

The Cosmopolitan Gas Lamps and 
Mantles — Up - to - Date American 
lights, brilliant and durable. 

We can sell these goods at lowest 
manufacturers' prices in Chicago, with 
duty added. This is a remarkably low 
price . 

The Rochester Lamp — A leader 
always when oil is used. Central 
draft, 80 to 400 candle power. 

FULL STOCK OF THESE GOODS 
ALWAYS ON HAND. 




Write us for particulars. 



THE ROCHESTER LAMP CO. OF CANADA 

24 Front St. West, TORONTO. 



W/E MANUFACTURE THE VERY BEST KINDS OF 

PAINT AND COLOR CANS 

VARNISH AND OIL CANS 

PAINT PACKAGES 

ROUND AND SQUARE PAINT IRONS 

LYE TINS 

Our goods are guaranteed to be reliable, and to give entire satisfaction. Quotations gladly submitted for any quantity. 

THE ACME OA2ST "WOEKS 



Jas B. Campbell. 



Office and Factory : Ontario St. and Jeanne D'Arc Avenue. 

MONTREAL. 



William Pratt. 




Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts. Square and Hexagon. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishingto be representedin Canada. 




«9- 



Pagc Acme Poultry Netting 

is close meshed at bottom and does not require rail or 
board support at edges, having strong straight wire 
(No. 12 guage) at top, bottom and in centre, cannot sag 
and is easy to erect. The "Page Acme" netting is of 
neat appearance, very durable and cheap. SVe also 
make farm and ornamental fence, gates, nails and 
staples. The name of Page is your guarantee of quality. 
The Page Wire Fence Co., Limited, Walkervillc, Ont, 6 



STANYON ENGINEERING CO. 



'Phone Main 2177. 



402 MCKINNON BUILDINC, 



-TORONTO 

CONTRACTING AND CONSULTING ENGINEERS. 

Steel Works, all kinds of Rolling Mills, Wire Mills, etc., all built complete. Machinery designed for any purpose. 
General Offices, - - PITTSBURG, Pa. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ONLY 

Wholesale 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 

37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. "TnIy*" 

CROSS CUT SAWS ^ 

I III; 'I ,1.1,11; , ,ir-l.l|l| HI ■ |||!« V\v» * 




W^t^ 



"Triumph" — Henry Disston's Champion Tooth, Narrow Blade. 







PATENT GROUND 



,«jjDOJU4o e 

i IMPHOVEO CROSS-CUT SftW 
13 EXTRA, IHIGH TEMPER CT 
REFINED ..CRUCIBLE 1 STEEL 



Henry Disston's "Toledo Blade." 

HANDLED CHOPPING 
AXES. 




i,:«ll i li'ui 



.n't!'n e .:'J 



npiww^ 




AXE WEDGES. 






AXE STONES. 



^^fe^ 



2)£X \&X>i> 



CHOPPING AXES. 



The 

Uncle Sam 
Axe 




DUNDAS AXE WORKS. 
Full Line. 



RIXFORD MFG. CO. 
Full Line. 



WELLAND VALE MFG. CO. 
Full Line. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto. 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY 



Graham Wire and Cut Nails are the Best. 

Factory : Dufferln Street, Toronto. 



OUR PRICES 

ARE RIGHT 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 

Manufacturers of the celebrated 






i2g 



HRSAC 



BARB and PLAIN 

Galvanized Wire 

Canadian Office : 
6 ST. SACRAMENT ST., MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 



WRIGHT'S 

Insect 




Sprayers 

PLAIN TIN, 
LACQUERED, 
ALL BRASS. 

"BEST ON EARTH." 



Manufactured by 

E. T.WRIGHT SCO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. and 
MONTREAL, QUE. 
J. H. Hanson, Agent, Montreal. 



KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32, Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 




Samples sent free on application. 

HORSE NAILS-" C." Brand Horse - Nails 
Canada Horse Nail (Jo. 

"BRASSITE" GOODS — Qunn Castor Co. 
Limited, Birmingham, Eng. 






THE INDEPENDENT CORDAGE CO., Limited, 



TORONTO. 



Highest Award Pan-American Exposition 

MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 

J,' A s ;, L LA ROPE, Lath Yarn, Shingle Yarn, Hide Cord, BINDER TWINE 



Pulp Cord, Clothes Lines. 



Transmission Rope a specialty. 



SAW-SET 



ASK YOUR HARDWARE MERCHANT FOR IT 

TAKE NO OTHER. FAILING TO DO ITS g 
ff WORK YOUR MONEY WILLBE RETURNED 
fc- R.DILLON, OSHMAont. !-< 



If our lines were not 
the best, there would 
not be so many claiming 

"As good as 

DILLON'S 

Headquarters for 

«« English Steel Scythes," 
Champion Saw Tools, 
Axes, etc. 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON EJECTING. 

12 and 16 Gauges. 
Steel and Twist Barrels. 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 




HARRINGTON 4 RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 

Also makers of H. & R. Revolvers, 

Catalog on request. Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 



STEVENS SINGLE BARREL SHOT GUN. 



. 



LATEST AND 
BEST SINGLE 
GUN ON THE 
MARKET. 




MADE IN 
THREE STYLES 
THREE GAUGES 
UP-TO-DATE. 



, 



FINEST SINGLE GUN YET PRODUCED. 

Our Goods are Handled by the Leading Jobb-rs. 



. 



. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p ° 2I ?°* Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. 




A popular line of goods at popular prices charac- 
terizes our product. We only supply the best, and 
that at right prices . 

' London Fence Machines, Steel Gate? 
Wire Stretchers, Wire Reels, Pliers, 
Diggers, 

and all kinds of 
FENCE WIRE. 

SECURE 

THE BEST. 




THE LONDON FENCE MACHINE CO., 



LONDON, 
CANADA. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



-tiT 



INVESTIGATE OUR LINE BEFORE PLACING YOUR ORDER, T WILL PAY YOU. 



&* 



HORSE CLIPPERS 

THE LEADING PATTERNS. THE POPULAR MAKES. 








We have unequalled 

facilities tor 

making 






PROMPT 






SHIPMENTS. 






Special attention 






given 
to 






MAIL 


« 




ORDERS. 



BALL-BEARING, No. 294— Extra temper, extra 
well finished throughout ; hardwood handles, 
ebony-finished ; brass ferrules. 



FETLOCK CLIPPERS - Extra quality, 
full polished and nickel-plated ; highly 
tempered spring; lK-in. cutter blade. 
This clipper meets with a ready sale. 



LEWIS BRO'S & CO. 

Montreal 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUICK MEAL 
QUICK MEAL 
OUICK MEAL 
OUICK MEAL 
OUICK MEAL 
OUICK MEAL 
OUICK MEAL 
OUICK MEAL 



" QUICK MEAL 



» SUMM 



The popular warm weather stoves that sell well everywhere Otl their merits. 

It's time you were thinking of them, and sending in orders. The forehanded dealer who can 
show them first gets the cream of the sales in his locality. 

We are sole Canadian agents for these quick-selling Blue Flame Oil and Gasoline lines, 
and would like your orders as early as is convenient. 



Catalogues 

service 



and full details at your 
for the asking. 



THE GURNEY-MASSEV CO. 
MONTREAL. 



THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., Limited 

TORONTO, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER 



Limited, 



QUICK MEAL 
OUICK MEAL 
OUICK MEAL 
QUICK MEAL 
QUICK MEAL 
QUICK MEAL 
OUICK MEAL 
CUW( MEAU 





THE BATTY STOVE & HARDWARE CO. 

(SUCCESSORS TO THE COPP BROS. CO., TORONTO) 

Wholesale Dealers in 

STOVES, RANGES, FURNACES, REGISTERS, MANTELS, GRATES, TILES, Etc. 

279 QUEEN ST. WEST, TORONTO. 

Handling the "NEW HOME RANGE " in 3 sizes, 6 holes, square 
high shelf, or with reservoir. 

The business will be conducted in the future by Mr. W. BATTY, 
Manager of the old firm. 

Specialty made of Stove Hardware, 

THE BATTY STOVE & HARDWARE CO. 



Will Hold Dp a Shelf! 

That's what a shelf bracket.is for. 
For this purpose there can be 

NOTHING BETTER 

NOTHING CHEAPER 

than the .... 

BRADLEY STEEL SHELF BRACKET 

It is well Japanned, Strong and Light. 

The paving in freight is a good profit, aside 
from the lower price at which the goods are sold. 
BSF* Order director through your Jobber. 

ATLAS MFO. CO.. New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 




"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn " 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLE3 D. PHILLIPS, 

Cables— Emlyn Engineering Works, 

Machinery," Newport. Newport, Mon , England. 

BREWERS' ENGINEERING 
BUSINESS. 

ON SALE as agoing concern, including plant 
and very valuable patent rights. Apply H. 
Boocock, Solicitor, Halifax, Eng. (4) 



THE C. G. YOUNG CO. 

RUBBER STAMPS 

AND SUPPLIES 

No. I Adelaide Street East Toronto 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in The Canadian Hardware 
and Metal Merchant. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Robin Hood 
Powder Company 

If*you want the best Trap or Game load in 
the world, buy "Robin Hood Smokeless," 
in " Robin Hood " Shells. It is quick, safe, 
and reliable. Try it for pattern and pene- 
tration from forty to seventy yards against 
any powder on the market. We make the 
powder, we make the shells, and we load 
them. Write for our booklet, " Powder 
Facts. ' ' 

The Robin Hood Powder 
Company — . 

SWANTON, VT. 



There are twelve 
Axes that sell well 
in every dozen of 

DUNDAS 
AXES 

Wait for travel 
lers with samples 
before placing your 
orders. 

Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont. 

W. L. Haldiraand, Jr., Montreal, Agent. 




fciii 



1 trysUllnl SimUfJ fill FIlilL 






m 



MURALO COrtPANV. 



MURALO 



THE MONEY-MAKING 
WALL FINISH 



Every dealer will find MURALO a favorite for 1902. It 
is a wall finish ready to go on when mixed with COLD 
water only. It contains valuable properties unattained 
by any other wall finish in the world. The Muralo Co. is 
the largest cold water paint and wall finish makers in the 
world. The Muralo Co. advertises you in a way that ad- 
vertises your business when they advertise MURALO. 



A. RA/1SAY & SON, 
J. H. ASHDOWN, 
ricLENNAN, ncFEELY & CO., 



WRITE TO 

- HONTREAL 
WINNIPEG 
VANCOUVER 



Agents 



IMPROVED STEEL WIRE TRACE CHAINS. 

Every chain guaranteed. Most profitable and satisfactory chain to handle. 




Improved Quality for 1902. 

THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., united 

HAMILTON, ONT., AND MONTREAL, QUE. 



ESTABLISHED 1843. 



•*£«S* 



INCORPORATED 1893. 



T" E Guroey-Tilden Co., l 



IMITED 



Hamilton, 



Toronto, 



Montreal. 



AGENCIES :— SAINT JOHN, N. B„ VANCOUVER, B. C. 




MANUFACTURERS 
OF . , . . . . 



LOCKS and BUILDERS' HARDWARE 



OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION. 



Horizontal Rim Knob 
Latches, 

Horizontal Rim Night 
Latches, 

Horizontal Rim Tubular 
Night Latches, 

Horizontal Cylinder Rim 
Night Latches, 

Horizontal Rim Knob 
Locks, 



Upright Rim Knob Locks 

(Plain and Ornamental), 

Horizontal Rim Knob 
Locks, 

Horizontal Rim Dead 
Locks, 

Upright Rim Store Door 
Dead Locks, 



Upright Cylinder Rim 
Dead Locks, 

Mortise Knob Latches, 

Mortise Night Latches, 

Mortise Dead Locks, 

Mortise Store Door Lock, 



and with many styles of Door Sets, the newest designs in Bronze and 
Brass Knobs and Escutcheons 




CAN BE HAD BY ANY DEALER 



Catalogues, Prices and Discount Sheets for thrashing 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOR THE 
STREET 



What 



It TMMUfc. |f 

THE M$ ff LIGHT 



FOR THE 
STORE 



Lamp! 



They eive a stronger, whiter, steadier light than the electric 
arc. Operate easily, safely, satisfactorily. Save money-actual 600 
candle power light at a cost of one-half cent an hour. Think of 
It! Write "for circular, etc. GOOD AGENTS WANTED- Exclu- 
sive territory allowed. 

ACORN BRASS WORKS, 
Dept. 8, 15-23 Jefferson Street - - CHICAGO, ILL. 



Lamps 
Save. 

Barrett Hardware Co , Joliet 111 , write : "Gasoline and sup- 
plies for six "M & M" Lamps cost us $45.46 last year, an average ol 
60c. a month per lamp. We believe we had as good a light as 
though we had six electric arc lights at a cost of $36)." No wonder 
that over 30,000 ''MAM" Lamps are in use all over the United 
States and Canada. THEY KILL BIN GAS AND ELECTRIC 
LIGHT BILLS. It will pay you to investigate. Write for circu- 
lars. AGENTS WANTED. Dept. 8, 15-23 Jefferson St., Chicago. 



See lYou Don't 
Have to Pull. 
A Child Can Do It. 










CWALUffti I 
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Mo 14' 



No.17 



NO. 16 



Walker's Self=Pulling Cork Screws 

Made of Crucible Steel, Nickel Plated, Polished Apple Wood Handles. 
EVERY ONE TESTED AND GUARANTEED. Several imitations on the market, but none as good. 

Mfrd. only by ERIE SPECIALTY CO., Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 



$" 



KEMP'S Broad Hoop 

Roll Rim Milk Can Bottoms 



<? 



«w» 



possess all the points which go to make perfection in Can Bottoms. 
They have been used by a criticizing public for three seasons, and 
their popularity is evidence of the satisfaction which they gave. 
The Roll Rim has no sharp turns which break the grain of the 
metal and lessen its wearing qualities. It has a broad wearing 
surface and will not damage floors. They do not cost more than an 
inferior Bottom. The IRON-CLAD TRIMMINGS are made the 
same as the broad hoop, and differ from them only in having a 
narrower and thicker hoop which does not require the 
Roll Rim, and, therefore, can be sold cheaper. For 
durability and finish our trimmings are unequalled. 

Manufactured by 

KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., 

TORONTO, CANADA. 







VOL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JANUARY 25, 1902. 



NO. 4. 



Montreal - 
Toronto 

London, En<;. 
Manchester, Eng 
Winnipeg 



President : 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. 

The MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

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Western Canada Block. 

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Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s. 

Published every Saturday. 

, . ,, ... (Adscript, London. 

Cable Address | Adscr £ t| Canada . 



• WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT IN THIS PAPER 



B.C. MINERAL OUTPUT INCREASES 
25 PER CENT. 

THE British Columbia Bureau of Mines 
has just issued a bulletin giving the 
estimated mineral production in that 
Province last year. The total value of the 
minerals produced was 520,713,501, an 
increase of 25 per cent, over 1900. The 
gold amounted to $5,600,000; silver, $2, • 
600,000; copper, $5,000,000; lead, $2,000,- 
000, and coal, $4,587,630. The Kootenay 
contributed about $7,000,000 to the mineral 
production ; Yale nearly $3,000,000, and 
the Coast districts about $5,000,000. 

That there should have been an increase 
of 25 per cent, over the previous year is 



surprising, for 1901 cannot be called a 
favorable year for those engaged in mining 
in British Columbia. As a miners' journal 
recently remarked, it has been " a period 
of marking time." 

In the Rossland district the labor trouble 
has been a severe drawback, to say nothing 
of the demoralizing influence of the collapse 
of certain well-known properties whose stock 
had been boomed to a high figure in the 
market. The British Columbia Review, 
published in London, England, in its issue 
of January 4, said: "It is now proved 
that the average ore in the Le Roi, War 
Eagle and Centre Star mines is of too low 
a value, after deducting the cost of smelt- 
ing, to leave sufficient profit to make an 
adequate return on the heavy capitalization 
of these mines. In the case of the Le Roi, 
the information published by the old man- 
agement has proved to have been extremely 
misleading, and, unless substantial econ- 
omies are effected both at the mine and 
smelter, the dividend outlook cannot be 
regarded as satisfactory. It is now becom- 
ing recognized that resort will either have 
to be had to concentrating the lower grade 
ores before shipping to the smelters, or else 
some new method, such as the oil process, 
must be employed in order to obtain the 
full benefit of the metal contents of the 
ores." 

The results have not been satisfactory in 
the Lillooet and Bridge River districts. 
Operations in the Cariboo country were 
rather disappointing, although good results 
are anticipated from certain new gold- 
bearing creeks that were discovered towards 
the end of the season. 

Owing to the low price of lead and the 
excessive charges of refiners in the United 



States, the silver lead mines in British 
Columbia have suffered a great deal, but 
relief in this particular is looked for— in 
part, at least — by the action of the 
Dominion Government in deciding to give 
a bounty of $5 a ton on all lead refined in 
Canada. 

While the Atlin district has not been up 
to expectations, the outlook is promising 
and the hydraulic companies expect good 
results this season. 

Mining operations in the Boundary 
country have made excellent progress. 
With modern machinery and appliances all 
previous records have been broken, and 
with improved railway facilities the outlook 
is most gratifying. 

Probably in no part of British Columbia 
have the results been more gratifying than 
in East Kootenay. The Crow's Nest coal 
mines were the scene of a great deal of 
activity during 1901. As will be noticed 
from a paragraph printed in another part of 
this paper, over 400,000 tons of coal were 
mined and 130,000 tons of coke made. The 
.ompany have 424 coke ovens at Fernie 
and 212 at Michel, having in all a capacity 
of 1,200 tons per day. Some extensive 
iron deposits have been taken up in the 
district, and, with the Great Northern Rail- 
way in the near future tapping the district, 
as well as the C.P.R., one may confidently 
look for a great development in mining 
operations in East Kootenay, and particu- 
larly in the neighborhood of the Ciow's 
Nest mines. 



The indispensible man does not usually 
keep afloat very long. He is dragged to 
the bottom by the sense of his own im- 
portance. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS MEN IN PUBLIC LIFE. 



ONE of the daily newspapers attri- 
butes the defeat of its candidate 
in one of the constituencies in the 
recent bye-elections to the apathy of those 
professing fealty to its particular political 
party. This may or may not have been 
the cause of defeat. As a rule party men 
are not apathetic. It is business men who, 
as a rule, are weak in this respect. 

Although there has been a great improve- 
ment during the last few years in this 
respect, we are still far from the ideal. The 
signs, however, are by no means discour- 
aging. Lord Rosebery, as our readers are 
aware, some months ago declared, in a 
speech now famous, in favor of a govern- 
ment of business men. Mr. Edmund 
Robertson, M. P., similarly expressed himself 
in an article which he recently contributed 
to The Nineteenth Century.' It is true that 
in Canada no statesman of relative import- 
ance has come out unequivocally in favor 
of such a doctrine, but it is significant ot 
the trend of public opinion that if a candi- 
date for Parliamentary or municipal honors 
is a business man the newspapers support- 
ing him do not miss the opportunity of 
emphasizing the fact. Even should he, 
while not a practical business man, have 
some connection with a commercial enter- 
prise, his friends usually make all they can 
out of this for campaign purposes. 

There is still to be found a daily news- 
paper here and there that is prone to decry 
the usefulness of the business man in 
public life, but, on the other hand, it is 
common to hear either the Dominion or one 
of the Provincial Governments spoken of 
as a Government of business men. 

It is evident, therefore, that the principle 
is making headway, and the more business 
men recognize that it is the best policy 
the better will it be, not only for themselves, 
but for the country as well. 



A PRAYER THE GOVERNMENT 
SHOULD ANSWER. 

A DELEGATION from the Canadian 
Manufacturers' Association is in 
Ottawa this week interviewing the 
Government on a number of subjects. One 
is the occasional recalling of our trade com- 
missioners in order that they might obtain 
a more thorough knowledge of trade con- 



ditions in Canada, and thus be in a better 
position to intelligently discharge their 
duties. 

Mr. Larke, the commissioner in Australia, 
is cited as a case in point. He has been 
away from Canada seven or eight years, 
and, although he is a man exceedingly well 
qualified for the position he holds, he must 
naturally have become somewhat stale as to 
trade conditions in Canada. 

Since Mr. Larke left this country to 
assume the duties of commissioner in Aus- 
tralia, Canada has developed industrially to 
an astonishing degree. In no similar period 
has it been so marked. 

Seven years ago our import trade was 
$110,881,682; now it is $181,257,988; 
our exports $113,638,803 ; now $196,487,- 
632, while the total foreign trade was $224,- 
420.485 against $386,903,157 in 1901. 

When Mr. Larke left this country the 
iron industry scarcely had a name. To- 
day Canada has a place among the nations 
of the world as an iron producer, the pro- 
duct of her furnaces now not onjy controlling 
the home market, but having become a 
factor in the British market as well. 

In every phase of manufacturing, in every 
branch of agriculture, in mining, in finan- 
cial institutions, there has been a develop- 
ment we believe far beyond the anticipations 
of the most sanguine of seven or eight 
years ago. In no branch of industry has 
the development probably been more 
marked than in the manufacturing arts. 
And in regard to no branch of industry is 
it more necessary that Mr. Larke and other 
trade commissioners should be well in- 
formed. It is to be hoped the Government 
will, therefore, answer the prayer which the 
Manufacturers' Association is presenting. 

It is not the first time, however, that such 
a prayer has been presented. The matter 
has been brought to the attention of the 
Government more than once during the last 
year or two. It is to be hoped that there 
will now be no further delay, and that, as 
soon as the Parliament of the Australian 
Commonwealth has finally adopted the new 
tariff, Mr. Larke will be recalled to Canada 
for a few months in order that he may not 
only become acquainted with the trade con- 
ditions obtaining in Canada, but that he 



may be given an opportunity to acquaint 
exporters in this country with the conditions 
and possibilities in the antipodes more 
fully than he can through the medium 
of the reports which the Department of 
Trade and Commerce issues monthly! 



A light weight in the prize ring may after 
all be an honest weight. 



NEGLIGENT IN THE ESSENTIALS. 

A GREAT deal of thought is being 
given to Canada's military repre- 
sentation at the coronation in June 
next, but little or no thought is being given 
to the representation of Canada industrially. 

It is quite proper that the military units 
of Canada should be properly represented. 
It would be a mistake if they were not. But 
it is equally a mistake to concentrate our 
efforts in bringing to the foreground that 
which represents the arts of war, and, at the 
same time, neglect that which represents 
the arts of peace. 

Canada is at all times ready to defend 
her own shores and to render service to the 
Motherland when occasion demands. But 
we are not a warlike people. We are an 
industrial people, and, if an effort is to be 
concentrated on any one phase of Canadian 
activity, it should be on that which is most 
representative of our national life. 

It is because in the past we have been 
negligent in this most essential particular 
that Canada has often been misrepresented 
in tableau in Great Britain as the land of 
frost and snow; for instance, by blocks of 
ice in a Lord Mayor's show. And even 
now, as we pointed out a few weeks ago, 
it is proposed to have Canada represented 
in the coming coronation proceedings by 
mountains with snow covered tops. 

At the coronation proceedings will be 
men and women from every clime under 
the sun. As an opportunity to represent 
to many millions of people the varied in- 
dustrial resources of Canada, it will be' 
great. Not probably for a generation 
shall we have its equal. And yet if we are 
active in anything, it is in the non-essentials, 
while in the essentials we are surprisingly 
passive. 

It seems to us that this is a matter in 
which the Trade and Commerce Depart- 
ment might concern itself. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



NEW IRON MINES AT MICHIPICOTEN 

(By W. Frank McClure). 

THAT the vast iron resources of the 
Lake Superior districts of the 
United States should find their 
counterpart just across in Canada is not 
altogether an unlooked-for development. 
1 1 has been a matter of wonderment in 
this country that Canada has been so 
slow to investigate the mineral resources 
of Algoma, in view of the favorable topo- 
graphy of the land, and the existence of 
tin; great ore bodies as near as Minne- 
sota and Michigan. 

To day. the same capital from the Uni- 
ted States that is building up the giant 
i ud us l ries about Sault Ste. Marie, in- 
cluding the water-power canals, is open- 
ing rich mines at Michipicoten. This will 
result in Canada becoming the location 
of her own steel and iron industries. 
Ureadj this evolution is rapidly pro- 
ing, and the Midland. Hamilton and 
Buffalo furnaces are using ore from the 
Iblen mine, the first of the newly-dis- 
red properties. The new steel mill at 
tin' Sault Ste. Marie, when completed, 
will use the Canadian product exclusively, 
and four vessels of The Algoma Steam- 
ship Co. are bringing Helen ore to Ohio 
ports, from whence it reaches the Pitts- 
burg furnaces. Some 350,000 tons have 
elv been shipped to the United States 
at a profit in spite of the duty of 40 
cents a ton. 

For shipping the product of these new 
mines a harbor with extensive dockage 
lias been established at Michipicoten, 12 
miles from the Helen mine, and about bill 
miles from Sault Ste. Marie'. 

The Helen iron mine is situated on 
Boyer Lake. The ore deposit has been 
exposed to the extent of -28,000,000 tons, 
and the limit has not yet been found in 
two directions. The Josephine mine, 
more recently opened, is in the same belt, 
but on Park Lake. This mine is also 
very promising. Then there are the 
Frances and Brbtherton mines on the 
range, The output of the new Can- 
adian mines is about 5,000 tons daily, 
but this will be greatly increased next 
on. The mining facilities are of the 

best. 

Mi E. V, Clergue, a brother of Fran- 
cis H. Clergue, the promoter of all the 
giant industries in Algoma, is in charge 
of the ore mining. He found, early in 
the mining operation, that the bulk of 
the ore taken from the Helen mine con- 
tained an average of about 61 per cent, 
metallic iron and 0.0S phosphorus ; also 
that at the point where the ore body 
comes to the lake a Bessemer ore is found 
running as low as .02 to .03 per cent, in 
phosphorus and in sulphur from a trace 
to .().") per cent. The ore has a high grade 
in the market, also, on account of its low 
percentage of water. 

The following from a report of Dr. 
Bell, of the Canadian (ieological Survey. 
concerning the Helen mine, is compre- 
liensive : " The ore is a hard, but some- 
what porous or spongy, red hematite, 
with a specific gravity of about 5. The 
ore body, from which a layer of muck or 
peat} moss has been removed, forms a 
point dividing the head of the lake into 
two small bays. It has a lumpy surface, 
with a dark bluish-grey color. Small 
quantities of brown hematite (limonite) 
and yellow ochre appear in joints and 
cavities, but they do not form any ap- 
preciable portion of the mass. 

" The horizontal dimensions of the ex 
posed ore are about 500 feet in every 



direction, and its greatest height above 
the lake is LOO feet. The ground rises 
steeply all around the head of the lake, 
so that the ore lies at the bottoini of an 
amphitheatre, open on the west or lake 
side. A drift has been run at the level 
of the general surface of the ore, south- 
ward into the hill, and this penetrates 
similar hematite for 250 feet, thus giving 
a known breadth of about 750 feet from 
north to south. During the winter of 
1899-1900, by taking advantage of the 
ice on the lake, a number of holes were 
bored in the bottom along a north and 
south line, which passed the extremity of 
the point of ore at a distance of 250 feet 
to the westward. On this line ami 
abreast of the point the lake had a 
depth of 100 feet, including 10 feet of 
soft mud, and at 150 feet below the bot- 
tom, where the boring ceased, the drill 
was still in hematite, like that on the 
dry land. A bore-hole from the surface 
of the exposed ore was sunk to a depth 
of Ins feet below the level of the lake 
without reaching the bottom of the 
hematite. The ore-mass has thus been 
proven to have a continuous depth of 
300 feet, and as this follows the plane 
of the bedding, which is vertical, the 
probability is that the depth is very 
much greater. The general strike is 
parallel to the axis of the pond, which 
is about east and west. The railway 
approaches the mine from the west along 
the foot of the hill on the south side of 
the lake." 

(t has been figured by experts that at 
a shipment of 3.000,000 tons a year it 
would require a decade to exhaust the 
ore above ground at the Helen mine. 
Mining men from Minnesota are taking 
a great interest in the new territory. 
They are of the opinion that the de- 
posits there are equal to those of Minne- 
sota. 

At Michipicoten harbor, vessels are 
loaded with ore at the rate of 1,000 tons 
per hour. Each ore pocket has a capa- 
city of 50 tons. In all there are 500 feet 
of chutes, and more building.' — Scientific 
American. 



COAL AND COKE AT FERNIE, B C. 

It is only a short time ago since Thos. 
R. Stockett was appointed manager of 
the coal mines at Fernie. B.C., but un- 
der his supervision their output has been 
increasing almost daily during the last 
three months. The estimated output for 
the whole of the vear 1901 amounts to 
over 400,000 tons of coal and 130,000 
tons of coke. Their 424 coke ovens at 
Fernie. and 212 at Michel, have alto- 
gether a capacity of 1 ,200 tons of coke 
every day in the year. At Fernie, about 
1,800 tons of coal are daily mined, while 
at Michel, the output is not so great, 
being 500 tons every 24 hours. At the 
Coal Creek (Fernie) Mine, nearly 1.100 
men are kept at work in connection with 
the mine and the ovens, while 250 arc 
employed at the mines at Michel and 200 
more at Morressey. These workmen alto- 
gether receive about 8100,000 in wages 
every month. 



Dangler ; Third \ ice President , I''. L. 

Alcott ; Secretary, H. .1. Trenkamp ; 
Treasurer, Ceo. F. Fiske. Tie' exei u 
committee consists of C. A. Stockstrom, 
F. L. Alcott, George ML Clark. II. .1. 
Trenkamp, D. A. Dangler, E. H. Stock 
strom and George F. Fiske. 

Following is a list of the new com- 
panies taken over by the Combine : 
liingen Stove Co., St. Louis ; Quick Meal 
Stove Co., St. Louis; George M. Clark 
iv. Co., Chicago ; Schneider eV Trenkamp 
Co.. Cleveland; Standard Lighting ( !o 
Cleveland ; Dangler Stove and Manufac- 
turing Co., Cleveland ; National Vapor 
Stove and Manufacturing Co., Lorain, 
O.; Monarch Stove and Manufacturing 
Co., Mansfield, 0., and The Twin Burner 
Vapor Stove Co., St. Louis. 



THE UNITED STATES STOVE 
COMBINATION. 

The American Stove Co., which is a 
consolidation of a number of important 
manufacturers of gasoline and oil and 
gas stoves, and which has an authorized 
capital stock of .8.5,000,000. has elected 
the following officers : President, C. A. 
Stockstrom ; First Vice-President. Geo. 
M. Clark ; Second Vice-President, D. A. 



THE LINSEED OIL QUESTION 

Editor " Hardware and Metal." —I 
notice by an issue of " Hardware and 
Metal " that a correspondent of yours in 
Montreal takes you to task for having 
said that some oils imported to this 
country were not of the best quality. In 
confirmation of this statement which you 
have made, we might ask your cone 
spondent if he is not aware that there 
are quotations made in England for oil. 
produced from seed imported from Brit- 
ish India, and that other quotations are 
made for oil at less rate, from £5 to £10 
per ton less ? 

As these facts are known to the trade. 
some have been investigating to learn 
the causes for this difference in price, and 
the explanation received is that oil pro- 
duced from seed from the Argentine 
Republic is not always equal to the oil 
produced from seed imported from Brit- 
ish India and other British possessions. 

The British blue books show the 
import of seed to Great Britain in the 
year 1900. Flaxseed was imported into 
England from foreign countries amount- 
ing to 891,422 quarters — a quarter being 
41(5 pounds. The total amount imported 
from British possessions for the same 
year was 774,609 quarters, the largest 
bulk of seed coming to England from 
what is called foreign quarters comes 
from the Argentine Republic, and is 
known as La Plata seed. 

Some British crushers, who have been 
interviewed in regard to the product they 
send to Canada, which receives the Brit- 
ish preferential clause of the tariff, have 
said in reply that when crushing seed 
they are compelled to mix from 00 to 
70 per cent, of Indian seed with La 
Plata seed to make the cake or oil of 
the quality they desire. Indeed, they say 
that in England they have great trouble 
in disposing of the La Plata oil pure and 
simple. As the oil imported to Canada 
from Great Britain comes very largely in 
thi' months of May, June and duly, and 
as La Plata seed arrives in England in 
•January, February and March, it is 
claimed that a very large portion of t ho 
oil coming to this country is pressed 
from La Plata seed. The oil made in 
England from La Plata seed must lie 
sold somewhere, and as English manufac 
turers and dealers do not care for it. 
Canada gets the large share of it. 

With this evidence before you, I am 
not surprised that you have drawn the 
conclusion that some of the oil imported 
into this country from England is cer- 
tainly inferior to oil produced in Canada, 
and think you were quite justified in call- 
ing the attention of the trade to this 
matter. 

DEALER IN CANADIAN OIL. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



NEW YORK METAL MARKET. 

TIN. — There was a further advance in 
prices on spot tin to-day, not- 
withstanding the recent large 
arrivals and lack of important business. 
The consuming demand is light at pre- 
sent and speculative interest is almost 
wholly lacking. In London there was 
more business than on any day for 
several weeks past, chiefly in futures, and 
the closing prices there showed a further 
advance of £2 on spot and £1 12s. 6d. 
on futures. The rise in the New York 
market has not been in proportion to 
the advance on the other side for the 
reason, it is said, that in spite of the 
efforts of the bull operators, who are 
credited with manipulating both markets 
for their own purposes, the large sup- 
plies on dock, coupled with dull trade, 
act as a drag on the upward movement 
here. The closing quotations in this 
market were 21e. bid and 24.50c. asked 
for spot and January, 23.50 @ 24c. for 
February and 23 @ 24c. for March. The 
Singapore quotation, as cabled to-day, 
showed a further advance of £1, being 
£103 10s. c.i.f. London. It was reported 
that to-day's purchases of futures in 
London were made by the principal 
operators here with a view to protecting 
this market. 

COPPER.— The Lake companies are re- 
port ed to lie making large sales at lie. 
but the orders coming in are not large, 
as the principal buyers are said to be 
still well supplied and can afford to hold 
off for further developments. Electro- 
lytic is quoted at 10| @i lie. and easting 
at lOfc. The London market eased off a 
lit tie this morning, but stiffened up later, 
regaining the loss on spot before the 
close, which was at last night's figures. 
Futures were 2s. 6d. lower than last 
night, but 2s. 6d. better than this morn- 
ing. The recent advance in London and 
to-day's firm close there have been with- 
out influence on this side. 

PIG LEAD.— The London market con- 
tinues to advance, closing 2s. 6d. above 
yesterday and 7s. (id. higher than a week 
ago. In this market business is slow 
and prices more or less nominal on the 
basis of 4c. for lots of 50 tons or over. 
In St. Louis the market was steady but 
quiet at 3.90c. 

SPELTER.— The market is flat with 
1. 35c. quoted nominally on spot and 
January, and 4.30c. on February. St. 
Louis was dull and easier at 4.12^ (a 1 
1.15c. London was unchanged. 

IRON AND STEEL.— Developments in 
lh' 1 iron and steel trades are not of im- 
portance and are along' the lines followed 
for some time past. While the continued 
scarcity of pig iron on the spot makes 
it practical for those who have any to 
demand and get their own prices for it. 
there is said to be little probability that 
a Further general advance in prices will 
result from (he present condition of sup- 
ply and demand. Concerning this phase 
of the situation the Philadelphia corre- 
spondent of The Metal Exchange says 
there is a considerable divergence of 
opinion, but that the majority consider 
thai further advances would be unwise. 
He says (hat such advances would tend 
not only to a large increase in produc- 
tion, but also do something to encour- 
age imports. " Of course." he adds. 
" the market could take a great deal of 
iron during the next six or eight weeks, 
hut with a return to normal conditions 
as regards coke and transportation, it 
is highly improbable that the present 
stringeney will continue." 



TINPLATE.— The market has a quiet 
and tame appearance, though it is under- 
stood that the larger consumers are 
contracting for about the usual quanti- 
ties taken by them during the first six 
months of the year. — N. Y. Journal of 
Commerce, January 22. 



BRITISH STEEL CONSOLIDATION. 

THE London Statist devotes con- 
siderable space to the recently 
rumored consolidation of British 
iron and steel companies. It is reported 
that Guest, Keen & Co., Limited, at 
Birmingham, South Wales ; Bolckow, 
Vaughan & Co., Limited, of Middles- 
brough, On-Tees, and The Consett Iron 
Co., Limited, in Durham, are to be amal- 
gamated. 

These three English concerns named are 
important ones. The capitalization <>t 
Guest, Keen & Co. is £3,000,000, or $15,- 
000,000, divided equally into 4 per cent. 
debenture stock, preferred stock and com- 
mon stock. Of the preferred stock £ 120,- 
000 and of the common £350,000 has not 
been issued. The company was itself a 
consolidation, taking over The Dowlais 
Iron Co. and Guest & Co. and The 
Patent Nut and Bolt Co. The properties 
taken over included collieries with an out- 
put of 1,500,000 tons annually, large iron 
and steel works and large interests in 
mining properties in Spain. The pur- 
chase price in cash for The Dowlais and 
Guest & Co. was £1,530,000 and for The 
Patent Nut and Bolt Co. £1,000,000, pay- 
able £200,000 in cash and £800,000 in 
debenture stock. The Consett Iron Co. 
was formed in ISO! with a capital of 
€400,000, which has since been increased 
to £1,500,000, of which £500,000 pre- 
ferred and £750,000 common have been 
actually issued. 

The earnings of Guest, Keen & Co. for 
the year ended June 30 last amounted to 
£387,065 after payment of all expenses 
incidental to the formation of the com- 
pany. This sum, after payments of 4 per 
cent, for the debenture stock, 5 per cent. 
on the preferred stock and 10 per cent, 
on the common stock left a surplus of 
£260.843, of which £150.000 was carried 
to reserve account, leaving £110,843 to 
be carried forward. The earnings of The 
Consett Iron Co. for a series of years. 
with the dividends paid, were as follows : 

Dividends on 
common. prefd. 
Profits. Per Cent. 

I9°i .£575.°88 8 50 

1900 672.585 8 50 

1899 433.9°° 8 33 1-3 

1898 772,884 8 20 

Before paying these dividends the com- 
pany wrote off for reconstruction of 
works £50.000 in 1001, a total of £225.- 
000 lor the three years. The surplus on 
June 30. 1901, showed undivided profits 
of £134.768 and a profit and loss balance 
of c 180.088. 

It will be now recalled that Mr, Arthur 
Keen, chairman of Guest. Keen & Co., 
with Windsor Richards, another director, 
visited the United States early in 1001 
anil inspected various plants of The Uni- 
ted States Steel Corporation. It was 
suggested at the time that The United 
States Steel Corporation was expecting 
to acquire interests in some of the Brit- 
ish companies, ft was also reported that 
these gentlemen were given an insight 
into the workings of The United States 
Steel Corporation in order to facilitate 
the floating of a part of the stocks of 
the company in London. 



WHERE FURS ABOUND. 

AT the ancient trading post of The 
Hudson's Bay Company at Ed- 
monton you are away from the 
modernity of the new town, and are con- 
scious of a certain atmosphere of histor- 
ical romance. From the front o> the 
massive whitewashed buildings, which 
have more than once been attacked by 
hostile foes, you have a fine prospect of 
river, and woodland, and fertile plains, 
stretching away to the blue distance. The 
Saskatchewan runs in a deep gorge be- 
low you and on the farther bank there is 
a diversion of outline and foliage that 
is very delightful. But I don't suppose 
the Hudson's Bay people used to think 
much of the beauty of the scenery in the 
midst of which their trading post hap- 
pened to be situated. Their eyes were set 
on the " main chance " rather too intent- 
ly for that. When the Indian came for a 
sack of flour they stood his gun upright 
and made him pile skins up to its muzzle 
from the ground as the price of it. Well, 
of course, it had taken considerable 
trouble to get the flour there and there 
was no competition. 

The fur trade is still pursued at 
Edmonton, and on the main streets one 
sees more than one sign on which is 
painted on legible letters : " Furs bought 
here for cash." Bears are to be seen 
occasionally within a few miles of the 
town, and it was not long ago that a 
Galician farmer of the neighborhood, 
seeing a cub roaming near his shack, 
fetched his gun and fired at it. There- 
upon its mother appeared and ran at him 
viciously, open-mouthed, and wishful to 
tear his vitals. The man, having powder, 
but no more slugs, felt that a Galician's 
house is his castle, and retiring therein, 
barricaded himself as well as he could. 
Till the day broke the she bear clawed 
all over the place in the endeavor to get 
at him. But the daylight enabled the 
farmer to find a couple more slugs, with 
which he despatched his assailant, after- 
wards coming up to Edmonton trium- 
phantly with her skin and that of the 
cub for sale. Only the other day a bear 
was seen by a townsman prowling 
around his back yard, though it decamp- 
ed with rapidity, warned, apparently, by 
the increasing daylight and by the noise 
the Edmontonian made in opening his 
back door, that the environment was un- 
suitable for an animal of its type. If 
you go 40 or 50 miles north or northwest 
you may " load for b'ar " with reason- 
able hope of bagging a specimen. Other 
fur-hearing animals are correspondingly 
numerous, and many a Mooswa and his 
companion roam in the vast wilderness. — 
Calgary Correspondence Mail and Empire 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment. 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 

HAMILTON, ONT 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



GLASS - 



BENDING PLANT FOR 
CANADA. 



THE art of glass-bending is one which, 
of past years, has been rather behind 
the times, so far as Canada is 
concerned, the imported article being 
largely required to fill the demand. The 
Toronto Plate Glass Importing Co. have 
lately changed the aspect of affairs, how- 
ever, by installing a large and most efficient 
bending plant sufficient to supply all the 
bent glass required in Canada for some 
time to come, and at greatly reduced prices. 
The plant, which cost several thousand 
dollars, is established in connection with 
their business and is the only continuous 
oven, as far as we are aware, in Canada. 
Heretofore, any glass-bending that has 
been done has had to be attended to in box 
ovens, which require to be shut up during 
the operation and until the heat is out of 
the oven. The continuous oven of The 
Toronto Plate Glass Co. permits not only of 
the glass being removed as rapidly as it is 
bent, thus giving place to more, but also by 
much more satisfactory work being done, 
as the process can be watched in all its 
stages and the glass kept perfectly straight 
and true, doing away with the possibility of 
much of it being destroyed, as in the box- 
oven process. 

The Toronto Plate Glass Co. are prepared 
to supply bent glass for shop fronts, houses, 
furniture, showcases and all other purposes 
where it is required. An advertisement of 
the company on page 17 of this issue gives 
an interesting illustration of several difficult 
bends of glass, together with wholesale 
prices of bent and all kinds of glass for the 
hardware trade. 



FAVOR TARIFF REVISION. 

AT a meeting of the Branlford, Ont., 
Board of Trade on January 14 
there was considered the question 
of tariff revision, which resulted in there 
being submitted and carried unanimously 
the following resolution : 

That in view of the present conditions of trade 
and the expansion of Canadian industries, it is 
highly desirable that the Government revise the 
present tariff, with a view to the preservation of our 
markets against unfair competition, thus ass'sting to 
maintain and increase our present industries and to 
establish new ones. 

This was moved by C. H. Waterous, who 
pointed out that the aim ol all Canadians 
was, or should be, the preservation of Can- 
adian markets for Canadians, and seconded 
by F. Leeming, who maintained that our 
Canadian tariff should be framed in the 
same spirit as our neighbors to the south 
framed theirs. 

H. Cockshutt supported this, as did also 
Lloyd Harris, who stated that Canada last 



Don't waste your energy 

in pushing "cheap" paint. It means hard, up-hill work, 
without bringing lasting returns. 

The same amount of energy put into pushing 

The Sherwin-Williams Paint 

will bring in more money and build up a lasting trade. 

It's harder work to sell poor paint than good paint — 
because you have to keep after new customers all the 
time. The man who buys poor paint once won't buy it 
again — you can't fool him twice. 

We want you to know all we have to tell you about 
vS- W. P. and our methods of selling it, and how it is a 
better investment than a stock of poor paint. 

Send for the "B-13 Booklet." We tell most of our 
story in that. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 




CHICAGO. 
NEW YORK, 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND. 
NEWARK, BOSTON, SAN FRANCISCO. 

MONTREAL, TORONTO, KANSAS CITY 




year sent to the United States $80,000,000 
less of goods than she received from them. 
Several others also took part in the dis- 
cussion, and a clause was added to the 
effect that copies should be sent to the 
Premier, Minister of Finance, Minister of 
Customs and Mr. C. B. Heyd, M.P. 



INDUSTRIAL GOSSIP. 

Those having any items of news suitable for this column 
will confer a favor by forwarding them to this office 
addressed to the Editor. 

THE management of the Grand Trunk 
Railway have decided to have a 
double track all the way from Chicago 
to Montreal. Of the 335 miles between 
Chicago and Port Huron, 161 are already 
double tracked, as is also a large portion of 
the Canadian system. On 78 miles between 
Durand and Battle Creek work is now being 
prosecuted, in the completion of which is 
necessitated the construction of 12 new 
bridges. From Port Huron to Montreal the 
greater portion is already double tracked. 
In the western end, 81 miles between Port 
Huron and Durand and 51 miles between 
Chicago and Sedley, Ind., of double tracks 
are now in operation, while work is being 
pushed rapidly on 30 miles between Still- 
well and Grangers, Ind. The equipment will 



also be added to, and already eight huge 
new freight engines have been put on the 
routes. 

At Grand Forks, B.C., the company 
working the Granby mines have just in- 
stalled a set of converters which are working 
very smoothly, the product being blister 
copper, in which the gold and silver value 
has been retained. The precious metals 
are extracted by further treatment in an 
eastern refinery. The Granby company, 
from the matte from its own furnaces and 
that from the Hall mines and Greenwood 
smelters, will produce 12,000 tons of 
blistered copper monthly, or 24,000,000 
lb. per year, exclusive of the gold and silver 
value the product may contain. 



EXPERTS IN CONSTRUCTION WORK. 

An advertisement of the Stanyon Engin- 
eering Co., Pittsburgh, Pa., on page 2 of 
this issue will be found of interest. This 
firm, which has already secured several 
important contracts in Canada, Including 
the equipment of the Cramp Steel Co.'s big 
new works at Collingwood, Ont., has open- 
ed an office in Toronto for the purpose of 
looking after their Canadian business. They 
are prepared to furnish estimates for ail 
kinds of engineering and construction work, 
the equipment of rolling mills, wire mills, 
etc., and the building of all classes of 
machinery. 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BOARD OF TRADE MATTERS IN 
OTTAWA. 

THE annual meeting of the Ottawa 
Board of Trade was held on Jan- 
uary 14 when the president's report 
was read, stating that there was a total 
membership of 235, and that the average 
attendance at the eight meetings of the 
board held throughout the year was 34.5. 

The report of the cheese committee 
showed that the quality and quantity of 
cheese made last year was fairly satisfac- 
lor^.although the latest number of factories 
listed might be better. 

The tourist committee are doing good 
work, especially in the obtaining of more 
space in the advertising literature of the 
C.P.R. and Grand Trunk. 

A resolution was submitted on behalf of 
the Trade Congress committee by Thos. 
McFarlane favorably commenting on the 
coming trade conference at London between 
Australian and Canadian representatives, 
and stating that the Ottawa board is in favor 
of a Customs union between the various 
colonies of the Empire, that a uniform 
duty over their ordinary tariffs might be 
levied on all importations from countries 
outside the union, the proceeds to be 
devoted to some common object, such as 
Imperial defence. 

The following are the officers elected for 
1902 : 

President — John Coates, acclamation. 

First vice-president — John R. Reid, acclama- 
tion. 

Second vice-president — Geo. S. May. 

Treasurer — C. A. Douglas. 

Council — C. J. Booth, F. H. Chrysler, Geo. F. 
Henderson, A. W. Fleck, G. B. Greene, D. 
Murphy, John McKinley, G. L. Orme, R. W. 
Shannon, P. Whelan, J. W. Woods and George 
Burn. 

Board of Arbitration — Thos. Askwith, N. A. 
Belcourt, J. R. Booth, W. Borthwick, Fred Cook, 
H. K. Egan, D. M. Finnie, J. M. Garland, R. M. 
McMorran, G. H. Perley, P. D. Ross, C. C. Ray. 



BOUGHT A STEAMER. 

A first class side wheel steamer has been 
purchased by the Algoma Central Steam- 
ship Line, which will be placed with the 
opening of navigation on the route between 
Toledo and Sault Ste. Marie, via the Cana- 
dian shore and the north Manitoulin 
Channel, giving a service of two trips 
per week. The steamer has a cabin capa- 
city of 500 passengers, will carry 500 tons 
of freight, and has a speed of 16^ miles 
an hour. 



The merchants of Elgin, Man., have 
agreed to close their respective places of 
business at 7 o'clock every evening of the 
week, excepting Saturday, until further 
notice. 



A GOOD AIM 

In manufacturing SINGLE GUNS it is a GOOD AIM to make the GOOD 
BETTER, and with that end always in view, to keep everlastingly at it. 

It is an Aim which is responsible for the universally recognized excellence' of 

Iver Johnson Single Guns. 




Semi-Hammerless. Trigger Action. Automatic Ejector or 
12 and 16 Gauge. 30 and 32 Inch Barrel. Non-Ejector. 

Send for Gun Literature. 



New York Olftce- 

99 Chambers Street 



IVER JOHNSONS ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 

■ FITCHBURG, MASS. 



Zanzibar Paints 

We do not say " there are no other good paints " ; we do not have to sell 
our paints in that way, but we do say ZANZIBAR PAINTS 

in point of service and appearance are unequalled. Do you carry them in 
stock ? You should. Write for our " Terse Talks." 



THE ZANZIBAR PAINT CO., Limited 



Toronto, Can. 



BRUSHES, BROOMS, 

WOODENWARE, ETC. 

Our Representatives 

are now on the road with full lines of samples 
and revised prices, and will soon be with you. 
It will be to your advantage to await their ar- 
rival, as they have with them the best values on 
the market in our lines. 



OPERATINQ 




UNITED FACTORIES, Limited 

Head Office, TORONTO. 



Boeckh's Toronto Factories, 
Bryan's London Factories, 
Cane's Newmarket Factories. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 



RICHARD JOHNSON, CLAPHAM & MORRIS LIMITED ' MANCHESTER 



Cable Address — "Metallicus," Manchester. 
Codes Used— ABC, AI, Liebers 
and Private Code. 

'Manufacturers and 

GALV'D SHEETS 
GALV'D CANADAS 
BLACK SHEET IRON 
BLACK CANADAS 
Range & Furnace SHEETS 

MONTREAL OFFICE: 

Messrs. Copland & Co., 
Imperial Buildings. 




WAREHOUSE LEVER STREET 



and LIVERPOOL, ENG. 

Metal Merchants 

TINPLATES, TERNES 
TINNED SHEETS 
PIG TIN, PIG LEAD 
WIRE NETTING 
GALV'D BARB WIRE 



HALIFAX OFFICE: 

Messrs. Grant, Oxley & Co. , 
68 Bedford Row. 



BOARD OF TRADE NOMINATIONS. 

THE meeting of the Board of Trade of 
the city of Toronto to nominate offi- 
cers to be elected at their annual 
meeting was distinguished by an event of 
unusual occurrence, the official farewell 
given to Edgar A. Wills, who for upwards 
of 20 years has been secretary of that insti- 
tution, but is now leaving to fill a more 
lucrative and more important post at Wind- 
sor. 

As soon as the regular business was over, 
Mr. A. E. Ames, the president and also 
president elect, in a very fitting speech 
presented Mr. Wills with a beautifully 
illuminated address expressing their regret 
at his severing his connection with the 
board. Accompanying this was a purse 
containing a good round sum of money. 

Speeches complimentary and expressing 
regret were made by a number of others 
which were fittingly replied to by Mr. Wills. 
The proceedings were closed by three ring- 
ing cheers and the singing of " For He's a 
Jolly Good Fellow." 

The nomination of officers was then 
proceeded with as follows : Elected by 
acclamation — President, A. E. Ames ; first 
vice-president, J. F. Ellis ; second vice- 
president, J. D. Allan ; treasurer, E. R. 
Wood. 

Nominations for Council : — Messrs. J. W. 
Woods, H. N. Baird, T. G. Brough, R. J. 
Christie, Noel Marshall, Edward Gurney, 
W. A. Warren, Miles Vokes, W. J. Gage, 
A. E. Kemp, M.P., W. F. Cockshutt 
""(Brantford), Peleg Howland, C. J. Marlatt 
(Oakville). J. L. Spink, C. W. I. Wood- 
land, P. R. Miller. 

Nominations for Board of Arbitration : — 
Messrs. Hugh Blain, Alex. Cavanagh, Col. 
Davidson, D. O. Ellis. M. C. Ellis, Thomas 
Flynn, James Goodall, J. C. McKeggie, W. 
D, Matthews, W. K. McNaught, D. M. 
Spink, W. Stark, S. R. Hart, W. E. 
Milner (Brampton), and George H. Baird. 

Nominations for Representatives on the 



Exhibition Board — Messrs. Thos. H. Lee, 
R. W. Elliot, Thos. Harris, S. E. Briggs, 
W. P. Gundy, G. H. Gooderham, Geo. 
Edwards, R. Y. Ellis and John Carrick. 

Nominations for Representatives on the 
Harbor Commission — Messrs. J. T.Mathews, 
Barlow Cumberland and Geo. A. Chapman. 

Aid. McMurrich, C. B. Watts and Geo. 
Love are the scrutineers who will count the 
ballots at the annual meeting. 



THE CHANGE IN TURPENTINE. 

This week advances of considerable pro- 
portions have taken place in turpentine, so 
now it is 7c. higher than last week and 9c. 
more that it was the week before. Prices 
are now being quoted for the cities of 
Toronto, Hamilton and London at 67c. per 
gal. of 8 4-10 lb. for one bbl., or 66c. per 
gal. for 2 to 4 bbls. Quantities of 5 bbls. 
are left open. To outside western points 
the price is ic. per gal. more, the freight be- 
ing allowed. The terms are net 30 days. 

For less quantities than 1 bbl. 5c. per 
gal. extra will be charged to all points, and 
50c. each for 5-gal. and 70c. each for 10- 
gal. cans extra will be charged. The terms 
in this case are four months, and f.o.b. at 
place of shipment. 



A NEW STOVE FIRM. 

The Batty Stove & Hardware Co., 279 
Queen street west, Toronto, have succeeded 
to the wholesale business in stoves and 
ranges formerly conducted there by a 
branch of The Copp Bros. Co., Limited, 
Hamilton. 

Wm. Batty, who has been with the old 
firm for the past eight years, has accepted 
the position of manager of the new com- 
pany. Under his direction they are 
extending their wholesale trade which has 
been previously confined to Toronto and 
other centres. 

The chief line which this firm is carrying 
is the " Home Range," which they have in 
three grades, and also the " Garland." 

They make a specialty of stove repairs 
to the jobbing trade and are carrying a full 
line of hot-air registers for furnaces. They 
also extensively, handle mantels, grates, 
tiles, etc. 



TURPENTINE AND ROSIN. 

AN increase of almost 192 per cent, in 
the capital invested in the turpen- 
tine and rosin Industry and of 152 
per cent, in the value of the products there- 
from is shown in the census report on the 
manufacture of those products in the United 
States. The report shows a total capital of 
$11, 847,495 invested in the 1,503 establish- 
ments reporting for the country. This 
sum represents the value of land, buildings, 
machinery, tools and implements, and' the 
live capital utilized, but does not include the 
capital stock of any of the manufacturing 
corporations engaged in this industry. 

The value of the products is returned at 
520,344.888, to produce which involved 
an outlay of $778,694 for salaries of 
officials, clerks, etc., $8,393,483 for wages, 
$476,171 for miscellaneous expenses, 
including rent, taxes, etc., and $6,184,492 
for materials used, mill supplies, freight and 
fuel. The total product of the spirits of 
turpentine in the United States during the 
year 1900 was 754,470 bbls., of which 
461,227 were received at the principal ports 
for distribution, leaving 293,443 bbls. as the 
amount shipped direct from the distilleries to 
internal points of consumption. 

The total value of turpentine and rosin 
products consists of $14,960,236, the value 
754,670 bbls. of spirits of turpentine ; 
$5,i2q,268, the value of 2,563,087 bbls. of 
rosin, and $255,385, the value of miscel- 
laneous products, such as tar, pitch, rosin 
oil, charcoal, refined tar, etc. From the 
distilation of the 4,033,161 bbls. of crude 
turpentine by the 1,503 establishments 
reporting, there resulted 24 per cent, of 
turpentine, 55 per cent, of rosin and 21 per 
cent, of other products. 

The consumption of spirits of turpentine 
in the United States is 20,397,588 gallons, 
or 53 per cent, of the quantity manufactured, 
and of rosin 193,969 bbls., or 7.6 per cent. 
The amount of crude turpentine (barrels) 
gathered and total value by States follows : 

Barrels. Value. 

Alabama 373, 005 $2,033,705 

Florida 1,212,935 6,469,605 

Georgia i,5i5.5°9 8,110,468 

Louisiana 20,299 115,324 

Mississippi 359,529 1 .772,435 

North Carolina 361,729 I i°55,659 

South Carolina 190,095 787,678 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE SHIPPING TRADE OF TORONTO. 

ACCORDING to the annual report of 
Colin W. Postlethwaite, the Toronto 
harbormaster, recently issued, the 
total number of vessels entering Toronto 
Harbor last year was 3,490, and 3,469 for 
1900, an increase of 21, and the tonnage for 
this year being 1,203,593, and the year 
before 1,109,784 tons, a difference in last 
year's favor of 98,809 tons. 

The cash receipts, including a balance of 
$10,446.11 carried forward from 1900, were 
$21,982. 77. The expenditures were $15,- 
863 26, leaving a cash balance of $6. 1 19. 5 1 . 
This is a falling-off from the year before, 
which was mainly owing to the reduction 
in the tolls. 

During the season, 155,009 tons of 
anthracite and 28,822 tons of bituminous 
coal were received, in all being 183,831 
tons, which is an increase of 19,025 tons 
over 1900. According to the Government 
returns, there were 421,488 tons of anthra- 
cite and 364,580 tons of bituminous coal, 
or a total of 786,058 tons, imported into 
Toronto last year, as compared with 761,- 
610 tons for 1900, an increase of 24 458 
tons. 

This was a poor fruit season, for in 1901 
there were only 402,448 packages imported, 
as compared with 519,540 in 1900, a 
decline of 117,092 packages. 

The following is a comparative statement 
of the goods brought in for the years 1900 
and 1 90 1 : 

1900. 1901. 

General merchandise, tons 20,294 24,949 

Coal, tons 164.806 183,831 

Wood, cords 1,283 

Lake stone, toise 2,490 2,595 

Fruit, in packages, barrels 5,285 1,795 

crates 4,709 7,122 

baskets 508,729 392,267 

bags 725 821 

Firebricks 473,700 46,600 

Sheep, hogs and calves 155 

Horses, cattle and vehicles 122 93 

Oil in bulk, barrels 25,000 23,783 

Ice, tons 2,518 6,777 



methods of working up a reputation for his 
firm's firearms is by shooting with them at 
various matches. He has won many prizes. 



DAMAGED HER BOILERS. 

Sandbach, Parker & Co., agents of the 
Canadian Mail Steamers, were advised by 
telegram on Monday, that the C. M. S. 
Orinoco, damage to whose boilers necessi- 
tated a delay at Barbados, sailed from 
Trinidad on Sunday, via the usual islands, 
for Halifax. The C. M. S. Oruro, which 
will be here this morning, brings the Orino- 
co's cargo for this port. — The Argosy, 
Georgetown, Demerara, January 1. 



A CRACK-SHOT SALESMAN. 

Among the callers on the wholesale haid- 
ware trade in Montreal this week was Mr. 
Parker, the representative of the Peters 
Cartridge Co., of Cincinnati, Ohio. Mr. 
Parker is a crack-shot, and among his 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

A SEED CATALOGUE. 

THE annual seed catalogue of William 
Rennie, Toronto, has been issued. 
This house, which has been estab- 
lished in Toronto for a number of years, 
carries a full stock of vegetable, flour and 
grain seeds, and also full lines of dairy 
supplies, agricultural implements, fertilizers, 
etc. The catalogue and price list, which 
is freely illustrated with handsome wood 
cuts and has a beautifully colored cover, 
will be sent to any address on application, 
if you mention Hardware and Mbtal. 

A PAINT FIRM'S CATALOGUE. 

A few moments spent in going over the 
latest 1902 catalogue of A. Ramsay & Son, 
paint makers, Montreal, is sufficient to 
reveal the full lines of white leads, colors 
ground in oil, dry colors, glass, artists' 
materials, glaziers' diamonds, etc., carried 
by this firm, who were first established in 
1842. They also have always on hand a 
full stock of brushes and cutlery used in the 
painter's and glazier's business. Mention 
Hardware and Metal when you write 
and you will be mailed a copy of this 
catalogue. 

roofing and cornice manual. 

" The Roofing, Cornice and Skylight 
Manual" is a book designed to be of 
service as a guide and reference, and a shop 
companion as well, to those following the 
business of tinsmiths, cornice makers and 
to young mechanics who are following any 
or all branches of trade comprehended in 
this volume. Three articles on as many 
subjects, "Tin Roofing," " Cornice Work " 
and "Skylight Construction," are included 
in it. 

The first article, which includes the laying 
of flat and standing screw roofing, was 
especially prepared for the book by a first- 
rate mechanic. The second section forms 
an extensive treatise on cornice making 
and equipment adapted for country 
cornice shops. In the third section 
are given two articles on skylight design 
and construction, being the first and second- 
prize essays, respectively, of a series of com- 
petitive articles on the subject. 

The book, which is freely illustrated by 
diagrams and plates, with 172 pages of 
reading matter, costs only $1.50, and will 
be sent by the publishers, The David 
Williams Co., 232-238 William street, New 
York, N. Y., on receipt of the above 
amount. 



CONDENSED OR " WANT - 
ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a word 
each insertion ; cash in advance. Letters, figures, 
and abbreviations each count as one word in estimat- 
ing cost. 



WANTED. 



WANTED TO PURCHASE— Foundry Cupola and 
Equipment ; second-hand preferred. P.O. Box 
660, Winnipeg. (4) 



FOR SALE. 



SHOWCASES, 18-ft. Counter, Signs, Warehouse 
Truck, Scale, Set of Bolt Drawers. Dry Color Cans 
Glass Board and other fixtures suitable for Hardware 
Store. These were in use only a few months in our branch 
store and are no longer required. Will sell cheap. 
J. F. STEVENSON & CO., HAMILTON. (4) 

GOOD HARDWARE AND TINWARE Busi- 
ness and premises in small town, splendid 
farming locality. No opposition. Excellent oppor- 
tunity for two live men. Too much work for 
owner. Apply, Box 76, HARDWARE AND METAL, 
Toronto. (5) 

STOCK OF HARDWARE IN A HEALTHY, 
growing town in one of the best farming sec- 
tions of Nova Scotia. Every facility for r'oing a 
good and increasing business. Apply Hardware 
and Metal, Box 74. U) 

SITUATIONS VACANT. 

BY A WINNIPEG WHOLESALE HARD- 
ware firm, two first-class Hardware Clerks. 
Must have a thorough knowledge of hardware in 
all departments. Address applications, stating age, 
experience, references, married or single, etc., 
Drawer 1473, Winnipeg. ( T -tf.) 

SITUATION WANTED. 

WANTED — BY YOUNG MAN WITH A 
thorough knowledge of hardware, a situation 
as traveller, assistant buyer, pricer, or order clerk. 
Can furnish A 1 references. Address. " Traveller," 
care Hardware 'and Metal, Montreal. (4) 

Don't Stand and Wait for Business. 

Make it — by using good printing. 
1,000 Good White Business En- 
velopes, any printing, for One 
Dollar. 500 Envelopes, 500 Note 
Heads and 500 Statements for 
$2.50. Snaps in Stationery. 

WEESE & CO., 54 Yonge St., Toronto. 

Jobbers in Stationery and Novelties 




JONES BROS. 

Stove Biick Manufacturers, Fire Clay and Asbestos, 
Furnace Cement, all kinds of Fire Clay Products 
made to order from patterns. 
BRACONDALE P.O., ONT. (near Toronto. 



THE LONDON SCALE WORKS 

QEORQE M. FOX 

(Successor to John Fox ) 

Manufacturer of Railroad, May and 
Platform Scales. 

91 York 'treet, LONDON, ONT.' 



Lace Leather 

Send direct to us for the celebrated 
" NIAGARA " Brand Lace Leather, best 
produced in thii country. Yellow and 
White in Sides or Cut Strings. Prices and 
Samples on application. 

WOOD BROS. 

Tanners of High-Class Leathers, 
ST. CATHARINES, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



GLASS BENDING 






■D 

« 

■ 



WHOLESALE PRICE LIST. 

NOVEMBER, 1901. 

Plate and Window Glass bent to ordinary sweep like Cut 
A, not exceeding Cut B, or one-fourth of a circle. 



Plate Glass 



Not longer or wider than 50 x 40 $°-75 per foot 

60 x 40 1.00 " 

5 0X 5° '-.S 

'■ " 60 x 50 2.00 " 

70x50 2.50 



Sheet Glass 



Not longer or wider than 30 x 30 30c. per foot 

40x30 35c. 

40 x 40 40c. 

50 x 40 50c. " 

50 x 50 60c. " 

60 x 50 90c. 

Trade Discounts on application. 

Prices are for bending only. Glass charged at current prices. 
Single lights, net list. 

Larger sizes, irregular bends, or exceeding above limitations, 
rough and ornamental glass, special prices quoted on application. 

Glass narrower than 12 inches charged as 12 inches wide. 

Boxing charged 10 cents per foot on the largest light packed. 

Orders exceeding 200 feet one size, special price. 



Refer to these cuts when abblying for 
quotations. 



77" 




WINDOW GLASS 



TO IMPORT. 



Prompt Deliveries. 

EVERY KIND OF PLATE AND WINDOW GLASS IN STOCK. 



Closest 



rices. 



Toronto Plate Glass Importing Co., 



Mill & Rutherford 



Warcrooms and Offices— 135 to 143 Victoria St. 
Bending Works-209 to 213 Victoria St. 



TORONTO 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES. 

DUNCAN McINTYRE, general 
merchant and sawmiller, Clarence, 
Ont., is offering 30c. on the 
dollar. 

P. Martel, general merchant, Roberval, 
Que., has assigned. 

J. C. Giroux, general merchant, Berthier, 
Que., has assigned. 

Joseph Laporte, wood and coal merchant, 
Montreal, has assigned. 

A. L. Stickney, general merchant, Stick- 
ney, N.B., has assigned to sheriff. 

The assets of B. F. Reid, general mer- 
chant, Aylwin, Que., have been sold. 

Kerner & Shaffer, general merchants, 
Campbellton, N.B., are asking an extension. 

The creditors of Joseph Slade, general 
merchant, Orwell, Ont. , met on January 22. 

Bessie Simon, general merchant, Green- 
field, Ont., has assigned to Geo. Hearnden, 
Alexandria. 

The creditors of J. W. Thompson, 
general merchant, Buckingham, Que., met 
on January 23. 

S. Black, of Black & Ross, general 
merchants, Thetford Mines, Que., has con- 
sented to assign. 

Albert P. Janisse, general merchant, 
Tecumseth, Ont., is offering to compromise 
at 40c. on the dollar. 

There was a meeting of the creditors of 
Bourne Bros., general merchants, Revel - 
stoke, B.C., recently. 

The creditors of M. Ornstein & Co., 
general merchants, St. Polycarpe, Que., 
had a meeting on January 15. 

Bilodeau & Chalifoux are curatois of J. A. 
Duval, hardware merchant, Montreal. He 
is offering to compromise at 25c. on the 
dollar. 

T. Y. McNall, general merchant, Mac- 
Lennan, Ont., has assigned to W. H. 
Plummer, Sault Ste. Marie, and his credi- 
tors had a meeting on January 24. 

Alex. Chisholm, general merchant, Ma- 
hone Bay, N.S., is offering to compromise 
at 50 cents on the dollar. J. Harvey Morris, 
grocer, Charlottetown, P.E.I. , has assigned 
to G. E. Auld. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

James Dempster & Co., planing mill, 
Halifax, have dissolved. James Dempster 
continues. 

A. O' Borne & Co., wood and coal mer- 
chants, Montreal, have dissolved, and their 
assets were sold on January 23. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

The stock, plant, etc., of The Diamond 
Machine and Screw Co., Limited, Toronto, 
have been sold. 



T. H. Metcalfe, agricultural implements, 
Treherne, Man., is selling out. 

M. Andrew, blacksmith, Crossland, Ont., 
is advertising his business for sale. 

Chester Thompson, general merchant, 
Selkirk West, N.W.T., has sold out. 

The assets of The Electric Cab Co., 
Toronto, are to be sold by the bailiff. 

The stock of E. F. Cowan, general 
merchant, Novar, Ont., has been sold. 

John Gibson, general merchant, Belton, 
Ont., is advertising his business for sale. 

M. Richardson & Co., general merchant 
and druggist, Dundalk, Ont., has sold out. 

The assets of Alexander Bros., general 
merchants, Port Daniel, Que., have been 
sold. 

Wm. Finlay, carriagemaker, Grand Val- 
ley, Ont., is advertising his business for 
sale. 

The assets of J. A. Teasdale, manufac- 
turer of spring beds, Montreal, have been 
sold. 

The assets of F. J. K. Alexander, general 
merchant, etc., Little River East, Que., 
have been sold. 

Douglas & Douglas, general merchants, 
Leduc, N.W.T., are advertising their stock 
or sale by tender. 

The real estate of Honore Thauvette, 
general merchant, St. Lazare de Vaudreuil, 
Que., is to be sold. 

The stock of R. P. Dalgleish & Co., 
general merchants, Mount Forest, Ont., has 
been advertised to be sold by auction on 
January 24. 

CHANGES. 

The Sunlight Gas Co., Montreal, has 
applied for a charter. 

Alain & Co., blacksmiths, Quebec, have 
registered a partnership. 

Labelle & Cie, builders, Shawenegan 
Falls, Que., have registered. 

C. Pratt, general merchant, Stony Plain, 
N.W.T., is giving up business. 

J. P. Ross, general merchant, Exeter, 
Ont., has sold to T. G. Harlton. 

John F. Titus, general merchant, Blen- 
heim, Ont., is closing out business. 

Joseph E; Pedlow, general merchant, 
Vienna, Ont., has sold to C. A. Gardner. 

H. A. Scarth, general merchant, Gris- 
wold, Man., has sold out to McArthur & 
Lyons. 

Thomas Grace, general merchant, 
Gracefield, Que., has opened a branch 
store at Low. 

Mrs. W. Bluteau has registered for Ber- 
geron, Roger & Cie, general merchants, 
Shawenegan Falls, Que. 

The stock of J. L. Aubut, general mer- 
chant, St. Eloi, Que., has been sold at 71 
cents on the dollar to J. C. Lafrance. 

The East Kootenay Lumber Co., Limited, 
Cranbrook, B.C., have been incorporated, 



and the Cranbrook Lumber Co., Limited, 
have agreed to sell their assets to them. 

Belair Bros., blacksmiths, Cowanville, 
Ont., have registered. 

Robert Elder Carriage Works, Limited. 
Toronto, have obtained a charter. 

The T. F. Moore Co., wood and coal, 
Montreal, have applied for a charter. 

James Temple, hardware merchant, 
Elgin, Man., has sold out to David Gibson. 

The John Abell Engine and Machine Co., 
Limited, Toronto, have obtained a charter. 

The Delfosse Co. , manufacturers of shop 
fixtures, Montreal, have applied for a 
charter. 

The Standard Lumber Co. of Manitoba, 
Winnipegosis, Man., has applied for a 
charter. 

The Lardeau Smelting and Rf fining Co, 
of British Columbia, Limited, Vancouver, 
has been incorporated. 

James Fletcher, agricultural implements, 
Binscarth, Man., has sold his harness busi- 
ness to J. A. Johnstone. 

Park, Mitchell & Co., Moyie, B.C., have 
also agreed to sell their assets to The East 
Kootenay Lumber Co., Limited. 

W. S. Sieward has bought out Munroe's 
interest in the firm of Munroe & Sieward, 
general merchants, White Horse, B.C. 

Angus Grant has registered as sole pro- 
prietor of the business of Donald Grant & 
Sons, builders, etc., New Glasgow, N.S. 

Leask & Slater have agreed to sell their 
sawmill at Cranbrook, B.C., to The East 
Kootenay Lumber Co., Limited, Cranbrook, 
B.C. 

The McNabb Lumber Co., Limited, 
Jaffray, B.C., have made an agreement to 
sell to The East Kootenay Lumber Co., 
Limited, Cranbrook. 

FIRES. 

The stock of A. Laurin & Co., painters, 
Montreal, has been slightly damaged by 
fire. 

The premises of The Toilet Laundry Co., 
Montreal, were slightly damaged by fire. 
The loss is covered by insurance. 

DEATHS. 

Antoine Beaudoin, lumber merchant, 
Quebec, is dead. 



SUNDAY WORK AT SYDNEY. 

A petition is being signed at Sydney, 
C.B., and will be forwarded in a few days 
to the dieectors of The Dominion Iron and 
Steel Co., praying them to put a stop to all 
unnecessary Sunday work. This documenj 
alleges that at present the employes of the 
company are obliged to do a large amount 
of unnecessary work on Sundays, which is 
contrary to the laws of the Province. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



1$ 



John Bowman 

HARDWARE & COAL CO. 

LONDON, ONT. 



SKATES SKATES SKATES 

We have a large stock of Skates to dispose of 
and will fill all orders promptly at closest prices. 

Cutlery Cutlery Cutlery 



Special Lines 



Special Prices 



English and German Table and Pocket 
Cutlery, Cases, Carvers, Razors, Scis- 
sors, Pen and Pocket and Table Cutlery 
in great variety. 

Special Prices. 



After Stock-Taking 

You will be replenishing your stock, so we wish 
to keep before your notice, "Dominion" Goods, all of which 
bear the following Trade Mark, which is a guarantee of quality: 



SHELF 
GOODS 




HEAVY 
GOODS 



Wood Screws, 

Wire Nails, (Papers), 
Bright Wire Goods, 

Wire Door Pulls, 
Steel and Brass Jack Chain, 
"Crescent" Wire Coat 

and Hat Hooks. 

Bed, Blind, 

a 



Wire Nails, 
Iron and Steel, 
Brass and Copper, 
Hay Baling, 
Pulp Binding, 
Galvanized, 
Barbed. 



w 

I 

R 
E 



nd Poultry \ .QTAPI FS i Bri S ht and Galvanized 
Netting. J UIMrLUW [ Fence. 

BROOM, MATTRESS, BOTTLING, 
and other wires. 

Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co. 



MONTREAL 



Limited 



TORONTO 



ESTABLISHED I860. 



INCORPORATED 1895 



STTGi-^IR HVL^IKZIEPIS' SUPPLIES 



"IMPERIAL" 



Steel 

Sap 

Spouts 




Improved 1902 Pattern, Tapered 
Specially adapted for Covered Sap Buckets. 



'EUREKA" 

Steel Sap Spouts 



Full 
Size 
Of 
Spouts 



HflPLE SYRUP CANS 
"LOWER CANADA' 



THE "EUREKA" STEEL SAP SPOUTS 



POPULAR 

Economical and Durable. 

Safe and Secure — No Leakage 

Easily Inserted — Do not injure the tree. 

Secure Full Flow of Sap. 
All packed in cardboard boxes, IOO each. 
We carry full stock of all lines. Write for prices. 
Orders by letter or wire promptly shipped. 



BECAUSE THEY ARE 



ROUND— With Screw Tops 
and Strap Handles. 

SQUARE- With FcrewTops 
and Wire Handles. 

Plain or Lithographed. 

CAPACITY : 

i Qt. Wine Measure, 
r Qr. Imperial Measure. 
% Gall. Wine Measure. 
% Gall. Imp!. Measure. 
1 Gall. Wine Measure. 
1 Gall. Impl. Measure. 

Special design made up, if suf- 
ficient quantities ar<- wanted. 



Sap 
Buckets 



Long Pattern 

Nos. 7 g 12 lti 
Quarts 4 >i s 

Western Pattern 

ti and 10 Quarts. 



THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL, 







20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, January "21. L902. 
HARDWARE. 

BUSINESS, en the whol<\ is quite 
active. The sprint; trade has 
started in with a rush, and 
travellers, who are now on >ne road, arc 
receiving many good orders for spring. 
These are principally on wire, building 
paper, cordage, harvest tools, bar iron, 
glass, paris green and lish lines. Both 
the English and German quotations show 
that the markets there are rather stilt. 
Milk-can trimmings are now quoted at 
25 per cent, off, and milk cans, 10 per 
cent, oil the list price. The minimum 
charge tor packages upon milk-can trim- 
mings has been fixed at \\ per cent, of 
the net value of the milk-can trimmings 
on invoice. 

BARB WIRE.— The market has con- 
siderably improved and there is now a 
good demand for spring delivery. We 
quote jS per 100 lb. f.o.b. -Montreal. 

GALVANIZED WIRE.— Trade is only 
fair. Our quotations tire as follows : 
Nos. 6, 7 and 8 gauge. $3.45 ; No. 9, 
$2.80; No. 10. $3.55: No. II, S3.65 ; No. 
12, $2.95, No. 13, $3.05; No. 14, $4.05. 
No. 15, $4.55 : No. 16, $4.80 ; No. 17, 
$5.20 : No. 18. $5.45. 



SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.— There is a 
fairly good trade doing. Bright iron and 
annealed, Nos. to 9. sell for $2.(50 per 
100 lb. f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamil- 
ton. London, St. John and Halifax. We 
quote extras as follows : No. 10, 6c; No. 
II. 12c; No. 12, 20c; No. 13, 30c; No. 
14. 40c; No. 15, 55c; No. 16, 70c 

FINE WIRE.— A moderate trade is 
doing. The discount is 22£ per cent. 

SPRING WIRE.— A small demand ex- 
ists. Spring wire is $1.25 extra. 

COPPERED AND TINNED WIRE - 
There is not much doing. -Sff e quote : 
Coppered, extra, is 60c; tinned, ^2 per 
100 lb. 

BRASS AND COPPER WIRE— A slight 
improvement is noted, but trade is still 
quiet. The discount on both wires is <»0 
per cent. 

FENCE STAPLES.-There is very lit- 
tle doing this week. We quote per 100- 
tb. keg, bright, $2.90 ; galvanized, $3.25. 

WIRE NAILS. — Business in wire nails 
is somewhat more satisfactory, but the 
demand has not reached any proportions 
yet. Our quotations are as follows : 
$2.55 for small lots and $2.50 for car- 
lots f.o.b. Montreal. London. Hamilton. 
'Toronto. Gananoque, Brant ford, Windsor, 
Out.. St. John and Halifax. 

CUT NAILS.— There has been a steady- 
improvement this week. We quote : S2.35 
per keg for small lots and $2.27^ for 



carlots. The discount on both flour-bar- 
rel nails and coopers' nails is 40 per 

cent. 

HORSE NAILS— Trade in this line is 
quiet. We quote : " C " brand at 50 and 
7^ per cent, off and " M " brand at 60 
per cent, off on oval and new city heads 
and 66 2-3 per cent, off for new counter- 
sunk heads. 

HORSESHOES.-Trade is still very 
quiet. We quote as follows : Iron 
shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 2 and 
larger, $3.50 ; No. 1 and smaller, $3.75 ; 
snow shoes, No. 2 and larger, $3.75 ; No. 
1 and smaller, $4 ; X L steel shoes, all 
sizes, 1 to 5, No. 2 and larger, $3.60 ; 
No. 1 and smaller, $3.85 ; feather-weight, 
all sizes, $4.85 ; toe weight, steel shoes, 
all sizes, $5.95 f.o.b. Montreal ; f.o.b. 
Hamilton, London and Guelph, 10c. 
extra. 

SCREWS. — 'There is only a fair trade 
doing. Following are the discounts : 
Flat head bright, 87{, and 10 per cent. 
off list ; round head bright, 82£ and 10 
per cent.: flat head brass. 80 and 10 per 
cent.: round head brass, 75 and 10 per 
cent. 

BOLTS.— The demand for bolts ha* 
been better, this week, but still no great 
activity exists. We quote : Norway 
carriage bolts, 60 and 5 per cent. ; 
common. 55 and 5 per cent.: full square 
carriage bolts, 60 and 5 per cent.; 



SAP PAILS AND SPILES WILL SOON BE NEEDED 



And we are still selling our well-known lines improved and better 

than ever. 



"EUREKA 



" Cast 
Iron 



Sap Spiles 



In their different styles — and we 
carry only the best — are undoubtedly 
the best on the market. 

Catch and conduct every drop of sap 
into pail. 

Easily inserted and removed, without 
injury to tree or spile. 

Will last indefinitely. 
They are the quickest sellers — therefore the best money- 
makers for the Trade to handle. 

We Ship Promptly. 




SAP PAILS 




- 



Made in two styles and mx 
sizes. 

Send for prices on these, and 
spiles. 



The McClary Manufacturing Co., 

LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, AND ST. JOHN, N.B. 

"•' Everything for -the Tinshop." 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



DRAIN PIPES, 
PORTLAND CEMENTS, 
FIRE BRICKS AND CLAY 
SlfelCA AND MAGNESIA 
BRICKS, 

with specially prepared mortar. 

Contractors' and Founders' 
Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 



31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 



. . FULL STOCK 



Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEMfWE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

« CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 
DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Enjine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
S required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



GIBSON ARNOLDI & CO. 

BARRISTERS. SOLICITORS. 
NOTARIES PUBLIC, Etc. 

9 Toronto St., Toronto. 

CAPITAL FURNISHED TO AID 
INDUSTRIAL CONCERNS. 

Representatives in London, Liverpool, 
Manchester, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Chi- 
cago, and New York, and Paris, France. 

GENERAL COMMERCIAL 
SOLICITORS. 



machine bolts, 55 and 5 per cent. ; coach 
screws, 70 per cent. ; sleigh shoe bolts. 
70 per cent. ; blank bolts, 60 per cent. ; 
bolt ends, 60 per cent. ; plough bolts. 55 
and 5 per cent. ; tire bolts, 67-J per cent.; 
stove bolts, 67£ per cent. To any retail- 
er an extra discount of 5 per cent, is 
allowed. Nuts, square, 3Jc. per tb. off 
list ; hexagon nuts, 4c. per lb. off list. 
To all retailers an extra discount of Jo. 
per lb. is allowed. 

BUILDING PAPER.— There is a good 
trade doing this week. We quote : Tar- 
red felt, §1. 70 per 100 tb.; 2-ply, 
ready rooting, 85c. per roll ; 3-ply, 81.10 
per roll ; carpet felt, 82.25 per 100 lb.; 
dry sheathing, 35c. per roll ; tar sheath- 
ing, 45c. per roll ; dry fibre, 55c. per roll; 
tarred fibre, 65c. per roll ; O.K. and I.X. 
L., 70c. per roll ; heavy straw sheathing. 
$30 per ton ; slaters' felt, 60c. per roll. 

C01ID AGE. — Business in cordage has 
much improved and a good demand is 
experienced this week. There are no 
changes in prices. Our quotations 

are as follows : Manila, 16c; British 
Manila at 13^c; sisal, 12c. and lathyarn 
at 10^c. Manitoba prices »*-e : Manila, 
16c; British manila, 14£c; sisal, 13c and 
lathyarn, 12c 

RIVETS AND BURRS.-Only a mode- 
rate trade is doing. Discounts are : Best 
iron rivets. section, carriage, and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., coop- 
ers' rivets and tinlned swedes rivets,, 60 and 
10 per cent. ; swedes iron burrs are 
quoted at 55 per cent, off ; copper rivets, 
35 and 5 per cent, off, and coppered iron 
rivets and burrs, in 5-tb. carton boxes, 
are quoted at 60 and 10 per cent, off 
list. 

SCREEN WIRE CLOTH.— This is be- 
ginning to sell well and a number of 
orders are being booked for spring. The 
price is 81.25 per 100 square feet. 

POULTRY NETTING.— A fair demand 
continues. Canadian or English is 
quoted at a discount of 60 per cent, off 
2x2 mesh, 19 wire, and 55 per cent, off 
2x2 mesh heavier, Canadian list. 

HARVEST TOOLS— An improvement 
is noted in the trade this week. A good 
demand now exists. The discount is 70 
per cent. 

FIREBRICKS.-This is about the 
same. There is a fair demand at the 
following prices : Scotch, 819 to 823.50, 
and English, 818.50 to 822.50 per 1,000. 

CEMENT.— There is practically noth- 
ing doing. We quote : German cement, 
82.30 to 82.40 ; English, 82.25 to 82.35 ; 
Belgian, 81.70 to 81.95 per bbl. ex- 
wharf, and American 82.20 to 82.30 ex- 
cars. 

METALS. 

Though trade on the whole is still 
quiet there i* a better movement thau a 
week ago. There is a better demand for 
bar iron and chain, and in the former 
prices are inclined to be stiffer. 

PIG' IRON.— There has been little im- 
provement. We quote as follows : Sum- 
merlce, 821 to 821.50; Canadian, 818.50 
to 819. 

BAR IRON. The demand is much im- 
proved and prices are becoming firmer. 
We quote : Merchants' bar, in carlots, 
81.87^, and in small lots, 81.95. Horse- 
shoe iron is worth 82.15 to 82.20. 

BLACK SHEETS.— Trade remains 
quiet. We quote as follows : 28 gauge, 
82.65 ; 26 gauge, 82.60 ; 20 to 24 gauge, 
82.50, and 8 to 20 gauge, 82.50. 

GALVANIZED IRON— In this there is 
but little doing. Our quotations aro : 
No. 28, Queen's Head, $4.40 ; Apollo, 10f 



Sanderson's 
TOOL STEEL 



Unequalled for Quality. 
Large Assortment in Stock. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

CANADIAN AGENTS MONTREAL. 



IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pumps 



Foroe, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We car 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



rHE R. HeDOUGALL CO., Limited 

Manufacturers, Gait. Canada. 

ADA/HI HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 




We offer for prompt shipment 
Pig Tin, 

L. & F. and STRAITS. 

ngo* Copper, O.O. 

Pig Lead. 

Spelter. 

Antimony. 



Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., Limit*. 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers of ^ 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL. 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Your Spring stock will be up to date If 
selected from the following lines: 

ELASTIUTE VARNISH, 

Granitine Floor Finish 

Maple Leaf Coach Enamels 

Maple Leaf Varnish Stain 

Imperial Buggy Paint 

Imperial Varnish Stain 

Imperial Gold and Silver Enamels 

Imperial Household and Bath Enamels 

Aluminum Paint 

Flat Black Lacquer 

Bronzing Liquids 

Lemon Polishing Oil, Etc. 

— ALSO — 

Shellacs, Japans and General Varnishes 
in all grades. 

A good reason why you should buy our goods is because we lead all 
others in neat and attractive packages, advertising signs, etc. And, above all, 
our goods make and hold customers for you. 

Write for 1902 descriptive catalogue and price lists. 



T iJ Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, ONT., CANADA 



LIMITED 



M Brand Paint 




Is the 

Ladder 

To a 

Successful 

Paint 

Trade. 



** FRANCIS-FROST C°— 

TORONTO. 
Canadian Distributing Agents for Grippin's Crack Filler. 



oz., §4.40 ; Comet, 34.25 with 10c. extra 
in less than case lots. 

INGOT COPPER— There is nothing- 
new to report. Trade is fair. The price 
is I lie. 

INGOT TIN. — A moderate business is 
being done. Straus sell for 27c. 

PIG LEAD.— A good trade is doing 
We quote |3.15 to $3.20. 

LEAD PIPE.— In this the demand does 
not amount to much. We quote 7 Ac for 
composition waste, and 7c. for ordinary. 
The discount is 35 per cent. 

IKON PIPE.— There is a good business 
doing in iron pipe, and prices are firm. 
We have revised our prices this week and 
now quote as follows : Black pipe, \. 
S2.75 per 101) feet ; |, 82.75 ; .>,, 83.15 ; 
I, §3.70; 1-inch, 85.25; 1£, 87.40; H, 
88.90 ; 2-inch, $12.25. Galvanized, §-, 
83.55; A, $4.15; ■'. 85.05; 1-inch, 87.25; 
li, 810.10; li. §12.15; 2-inch, 816.55. 

TINPLATES— There is not much 
doing. We quote : Cokes at $3.75 to $4: 
charcoal, §1.25 to 81.50. 

CANADA PLATE.— Trade remains quiet 
and prices unchanged. We quote as fol- 
lows : 52's, 82.65 to 82.70 ; 60's, $2.75 
to 82.80 ; 75's, 82.80 to $2.85 ; full 
polished, 83.75, and galvanized, §4.25 to 
$4.35. 

STEEL.— A moderate trade is doing. 
Jobbers are now obtaining 83 for machin- 
ery steel, in large quantities, an advance 
of 15c. Our quotations are as follows : 
Sleigh shoe, $2.05; tire, $2.15; bar, $2; 
spring, 82.85 : machinery, 83.00, and toe- 
calk, §2.60. 

SHEET STEEL— The market has not 
improved. Our quotations are : Nos. 10 
to 20, 82.50 ; 3-16, $2.50 ; i, 5-16 and |, 
$2.40. 

TOOL STEEL.— The demand for this 



is improving, but a small movement con- 
tinues. We quote : Black Diamond at 8c; 
Jessop's, 13c. 

TERNE PLATES.— The trade is quiet. 
Prices are $7.75 to $8. 

COIL CHAIN. — Business this week is 
good and prices have not changed. 
Our quotations are as follows : No. 
6, 12£c; No. 5, 104c; No. 4, 10c; 
No. 3, 9£c; ±-in., 7£c. per lb.; 5-16, 
§4.80 ; 5-16 exact, $5.25 ; g, §4.25 ; 7-16, 
§4.05 ; i, §3.85 ; 9-16, $3.75 ; $, §3.55 ; 
f, $3.50 ; i, $3.45 ; 1-in., §3.45. In car- 
load lots an allowance of 10c. is made. 

SHEET ZINC. -There is but little 
doing. We still quote $5.75 to §6.25. 

ANTIMONY.— There is only a light 
movement. The price is 10c. 

ZINC SPELTER.— The business in this 
line does not amount to much at pre- 
sent. We quote 5c 

SOLDER. — A fair trade is doing at 
steady prices. Bar solder is worth 18c. 
and wire solder, 20c. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

The feature of this market is the ad- 
vance in turpentine, there being a total 
gain of 7c. following the strong feel- 
ing in the primary markets. Prices 
are very firm, and turpentine is 
now so scarce that until the new 
crop comes in the market is altogether 
likely to continue strong. Further ad- 
vances are looked for by some dealers. 
It is rumored, although it is early to 
take serious notice of it, that the new 
crop will be considerably lighter than 
last year. Linseed oil remains firm at 
unchanged prices. Paris green shows 
some activity and good orders are being- 
booked this week. General goods are 
now beginning to move freely, and manu- 
facturers are all busy. There are bright 



prospects for an early spring trade. We 
quote as follows : 

WHITE LEAD— Best brands, Govern- 
ment standard, §5.874; No. 1, $5.50 ; No. 
2 §5.124; No. 3, $4.75; No. 4, §4.37* 
all f.o.b. Montreal. Terms, 3 per cent, 
cash or four months. 

DRY WHITE LEAD— $5.25 in casks ; 
kegs, $5.50. 

DRY WHITE ZINC — Pure dry, 6£c. ; 
No. 1, 5£c. ; in oil, pure, 7£c. ; No. 1, 
0£c. ; No. 2, 5Jc. 

PUTTY — We quote : Bulk, in bbls., 
§1.90 per 100 lb. ; bulk, in less quantity, 
§2.05 ; bladders, in bbls., $2.25 ; blad- 
ders, in 100 or 200 lb. kegs or boxes, 
§2.40 ; in tins, $2.55 to $2.65 ; in less 
than 100-tb. lots, $3 f.o.b. Montreal, 
Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph. Maritime Provinces, 10c. high- 
er, f.o.b. St. John and Halifax. 

ORANGE MINERAL— Casks, 7c; 100 
lb. kegs, 7£c ; smaller quantities, 8£c. 

RED LEAD — Genuine red lead in 
casks, $4.50 ; in 100-lb. kegs, $4.75 ; less 
quantities, $5.75 per 100 lb. No. 1 red 
lead, casks, $4.25 ; kegs, $4.50, and^ 
smaller quantities, $5.50. 

LITHARGE— Ground, casks, 5c. ; less, 
54c ; Hake litharge, casks, $5.25 ; smalls, 
$5.75 per 100 lb. 

LINSEED OIL-Raw, 75c; boiled, 78c. 
in 5 to 9 bbls., lc. less, 10 to 20 bbl. 
lots open, net cash, plus 2c for four 
months. Delivered anywhere in Ontario 
between Montreal and Oshawa at 2c per 
gal. advance and freight allowed. 

TURPENTINE— Single bbls., 67c ; 2 
to 4 bbls., 66c. ; 5 bbls. and over, open 
terms. 

SHELLAC VARNISH — Pure white, 
$2.35 to $2.45 ; orange, $2.25 to $2.35. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



23 



MIXED PAINTS— SI. 20 to $1.45 per 
gal. 

CASTOR OIL— 8| to 9£c. in wholesale 
lots, and $c additional for small lots. 

SEAL 01L-47$ to 49c. 

COD OIL— 32$ to 35c. 

PARIS GREEN — Petroleum barrels, 
16£c. per lb.; arsenic kegs, 17c; 50 and 
100-lb. drums, 174c.; 25-lb. drums, 18c. : 
1-Ib. packages, 18$c; $-tb. packages, 
20ic; 1-lb. tins, 19$c; $-fo. tins, 21$c 
f.o.b. Montreal. Tei-ms : 3 per cent. 30 
days, or four months from date of 
delivery. 

GLASS. 

( I lass is among the lines which has 
taken a turn for the better for spring 
delivery. A fairly good business is now 
doing at firm figures. We quote : First 
break, 50 feet, $2.10 ; second, $2.20 for 50 
feet : first break, 100 feet, 84 ; second 
Break, $4.20; third break, $4.70, and 
fourth break, 84.95. 

SCRAP METALS. 

Business is quiet, though the demand is 
a steady one. There are no changes in 
our ([notations. We quote : Heavy cop- 
per and wire, 13$ to 14c. per 
lb. ; light copper, 12 to 12$c; heavy 
brass, 12 to 12$c; heavy yellow, 9$c; 
light brass, 6$c; lead, 2% to 2|c. per lb.; 
zinc, 2 to 2Jc; iron, No. 1, wrought, $10 
light brass, 6$c; lead, 2$ to 2^c. per lb.; 
zinc, 2 to 2£c.; iron, No. 1, wrought, $10 
to $15 per gross ton f.o.b. Montreal ; 
stove plate, $8 to $9 ; machinery scrap. 
$14 ; light iron, No. 2, $5 a ton ; malle 
able and steel, $4 ; rags, country, 00 to 
70c. per 100 lb.; old rubbers, 7 to 7£c. 
per ft. 

HIDES. 

The market is quiet. We quote : No. 1 
hides, 7$c; No. 2. 6$c; No. 3, 5$c 
Sheepskins, 60c. 

MARKET NOTES. 

Turpentine has advanced to 07c. for 
single barrels and 66c. for 2 to 4 barrels. 

Milk-can trimmings are now quoted at 
25 per cent, off list, and milk cans at 
40 per cent. off. 

Machinery steel is 15c. higher, for large 
quantities, the price now being $3. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, January 24, 1902. 
HARDWARE. 

BUSINESS in most lines of hardware 
is enjoying its usual January 
quietude, if anything, there is 
not as much doing as there was a week 
ago, and the shipping rooms are lacking 
in the evidences of activity. The quiet- 
ness, however, is giving those who are 
engaged in stock-taking an opportunity 
of pushing their work to completion. 
Most of the business being done is still 
on spring-shipment account, and the out- 
look in this particular is rather satis- 
factory. Some Orders are being received 
for cross-cut saws, screen doors and win- 
dows, harvest tools, spades anil shovels, 
and green wire cloth. A good business 
is being done in dairy supplies, and on 
Wednesday and Thursday there was a 
big demand for snow shovels as a result 
of the heavy snow fall. Payments are, 
on the whole, fair. 

BARB WIRE.— There is little or noth- 
ing doing. We (piote as follows : F. o. b. 
Cleveland, $2.77$ for less than carlots, 
and $2.65 for carlots. From stock To- 
ronto, $3. 



GALVANIZED WIRE.— Dull and with- 
out change. We quote as follows: Nos. 0, 
7 and S, $3.50 to #3.85 per 1U0 10., accord- 
ing to quantity ; JSo. 9, $2.85 to $3.16 ; 
i\o. 1U, $3.0U to $3.95; lNo. 11, $3.7" to 
$4.1U ; lNo. 12, $3 to $3.30; No. 13, $3.io 
to $3.40 ; No. 14, $4.10 to $4.50 ; No. 16, 
$4.00 to $5.50 ; No. 16, $4.85 to $5.35. 
Nos. to 9 base f.o.b. Cleveland are 
quoted at $2.52$ in less than carlots and 
12c. less for carlots of 15 tons. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.— Practically 
nothing doing. Base price, §2.00 per lull 
lb. Oiling, iUc; coppering, 00c, and tin- 
ning, $2 per 10U lb. extra. Delivery points 
Toronto, Hamilton, London and Mont- 
real, with freights equalized on those 
points. 

htKE NAILS.— A little sorting-up busi- 
ness is being done and an occasional 
order for future delivery is being received, 
but trade, on the whole, is dull. We 
quote $2.55 for less than carlots, and 
$2.50 for carlots. Delivery points, To- 
ronto, Hamilton, London, Gananoque 
and Montreal. 

CUT NAILS.— Business is still limited. 
We quote base price $2.35 per keg 
with 7$c allowance on carlots. 

HORSE NAILS.— Business is quiet. 
The discount's are as follows : " C 
brand, oval head, 50 and 7$ per cent., 
and on " M " and other brands, 50, 10 
and 5 per cent. Countersunk head 60 per 
cent. All the manufacturers are now un- 
derstood to be selling off the same list. 

HORSESHOES.— Not a great deal is 
being done. We quote f.o.b. Toronto as fol- 
lows : Iron shoes, No. 2 and larger, light, 
medium and heavy, $3.60 ; snow shoes, 
$3.85 ; light steel shoes, $3.70 ; feather- 
weight (all sizes), $4.95; iron shoes, No. 
1 and smaller, light, medium and heavy 
(all sizes), $3.85 ; snow shoes, $4 ; light, 
steel shoes, $3.95 ; featherweight (all 
sizes), $4.95. 

SCREWS. — Business is moderate. The 
discounts are as follows : Flat head 
bright, 87$ and 10 per cent.; round head 
bright, 82$ and 10 per cent.; flat head 
brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round head 
brass, 75 and 10 per cent.; round head 
bronze, 65 per cent., and flat head bronze 
70 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS.— Business is 
keeping up fairly well. We quote : Iron 
rivets, 60 and 10 per cent.; iron burrs, 55 
per cent.; copper rivets and burrs, 25 and 
5 per cent. 

BOLTS AND NUTS. -The demand 
continues active. We quote as fol- 
lows : Carriage bolts, common (81 
list), 55 and 5 per cent.; carriage 
bolts, full square ($2.40 list), 60 and 5 
per cent.; carriage bolts, Norway iron 
($3 list), 60 and 5 per cent.; machine 
bolts, all sizes, 55 and 5 per cent.; coach 
screws, 70 per cent. 

ROPE. — Business is seasonably quiet. 
We quote as follows : Pure manila, 16c; 
British manila, 13$c; sisal, 12c 

CUTLERY.— Certain makes of English 
cutlery are scarce, the manufacturers 
being unable to keep up with their orders. 
The demand on retail account is light. 

SPORTING GOODS.— An occasional 
rifle and gun is wanted and there is some 
demand for ammunition and shot. A 
limited quantity of skates and hockey 
sticks have gone out during the week. 

DAIRY SUPPLIES.— The demand con- 
tinues good for milk-can trimmings, and 
the discount is unchanged at 25 per 
cent. 

SCREEN DOORS AND WINDOWS.— 
Some business is still being done on 



OUR METALLIC 
CEILINGS^WALLS 

Aro both artistic and serviceable. 
Popularly used by practical people 
everywhere. 



iT ~LM 



UvT 




S'Z\. 



^ ;g ^_^ 



Easily applied— most moderate in 
cost — fire-proof, sanitary and won- 
derfully durable — with countless 
designs to select from. 
Write us for booklet telling all about them. 

METALLIC ROOFING CO., Limited 

Wholesale Mfrs. TORONTO, CANADA. 



future account. Common doors, 2 or .'! 
panel, are quoted as follows : Walnut, 
stained, 3-inch style, 80.SU per dozen ; 
stained, yellow, $7; natural color, oil 
finish. $8.15; 4-inch style, 20c. extra per 
dozen f.o.b. factory point ; f.o.b. Mont- 
real and Ottawa prices are 30c. per 
dozen advance on above figures. 

HARVEST TOOLS.— A few orders have 
been received during the past week, but 
the country is now pretty well supplied. 
Discount is 70 per cent. 

SPADES AND SHOYKLS.— There is a 
small but steady demand from stock and 
some business on future account is still 
being done. Discount 40 and 5 per cent. 

CEMENT. — A very promising number of 
inquiries have been made for cement ami 
it looks as if trade from now on will 
continue to improve. We are quoting : 
Canadian Portland. Rathbun's " Star," 
$2.25 to $2.65; " Beaver," 82.10 to $2.50; 
"Ensign," $1.90 to $2.30; German, $3. 15; 
English, $3 ; Belgian, $2.50 to $2.75 ; 
Canadian hydraulic, $1.25 to $1.50 per 
bbl. 

METALS. 
Iron and steel continue steady in price. 
Tin and copper are weak and lower in 
price. Business in metals generally is fairly 
good. 

Pig Iron — There is nothing particularly 
new in the situation. There is not a large 
business being done, but prices rule steady. 
We quote : Canadian pig iron at $17.50 
to $18 on track Toronto for No. 2 foundry. 

Bar Iron — Demand keeps brisk and 
prices firm. Base price JS1.95 to #2.05. 
Extras cut to length while rolling : 2 ft. 
and over, 10c. per 100 lb.; 1 ft. and under 
2 ft., 15c. ; under 1 ft., 20c. ; over 20 
ft. by special agreement, according to 
length and size. 

Steel — There is a good demand for 
machinery steel, and prices rule firm. We 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



quote as follows : Merchantable cast 
steel, 9 to 15c. per lb. ; drill steel, 8 
to toe. per lb.; "BC" and "Black 
Diamond " tool steel, 10 to 11c. ; Jessop's, 
Morton's and Firth's tool steel, 14c; 
toe calk steel, #2.85 to #3 ; tire steel, $2.30 
to $2.50 ; sleighshoe steel, $2.10 to $2.25; 
reeled machinery steel, $3, hoop steel, 
S3. 10. 

Black Sheets — The demand is good 
and there is a fair supply. We quote : 
Common, $3.15 for 28 gauge; and dead 
flat, $2. 50 for 26 gauge. 

Canada Plates — A few small sorting- 
up orders have been received during the 
week, but the demand is not active. We 
quote : All dull, S3 00 ; half polished, 
S3. 10 ; all bright, S3. 75. 

Galvanized Sheets — For this time 
of the year the demand is good. We quote 
as follows: "Queen's Head" brand at 
S450 in case lots, and S4 65 in less 
quantities. 

Tin — The market is weak and irregular. 
In London on January 22 prices dropped 
£2 5s. and closed weak, and in New York 
there was a decline of 50 points on the same 
day. Locally there has been quite a little 
trading in small lots, and quotations are 
ic. lower, being S28 to S29 per 100 lb. 

Tinplates — There is a good demand far 
this time of the year, and it is thought that 
prices have about reached the bottom. Our 
quotations on coke plates are 25c. lower, 
I C, usual sizes, now being $\ per box. 

Tinned Sheets — Trade is fair. We 
quote as follows : 72 x 30, up to 24 
gauge, 7j£c; ditto, up to 26 gauge, 8c. 

Terne Plates— Quiet. We still quote : 
I C, 20 x 28 gauge, at $8 50. 

Copper — Local quotations show a de- 
cline in both ingot and sheet copper. Ingot 
is now down to $14 per 100 lb., and plain 
sheets are quoted at S22 to S23. The idea 
for tinned copper sheets is S24 per 100 lb. 
In London on Wednesday prices closed 
ios. lower on both spot and futures and was 
attributed to free selling, particularly of 
futures. New York was quiet and steady 
at lie. 

Brass — The demand shows some im- 
provement, and a fair business is being 
done. The discount has been increased, 
now being 15 per cent. 

Solder — Business is brisk. We quote : 
Half-and-half, guaranteed, 19c; do. com- 
mercial, \Zy z z. ; refined, 18c. ; wiping, 
I7#c. 

Lead — The demand is good. We quote : 
S3. 50 to S3 75 f° r P'R lead and #5 for bar. 

Iron Pipe — Business is fairly good. 
We quote : Black pipe. $5-4° for i-inch. ; 
galvanized, S7 95 for i-inch. 

Zinc Spelter — Trade is quiet at SS 50 
to $6 per 100 lb. 



Zinc Sheet — There is a fair movement 
in small lots. We quote $6 to #6.25 in 
casks and part casks. 

Antimony — The demand is good at 10c. 
per lb. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

There has sprung up quite an active 
inquiry for raw and boiled linseed oil, while 
white leads continue quite active. Sealed 
can paints have hardly yet commenced to 
move, although some orders are being 
booked for later delivery. Dry colors are 
quiet, while shellacs remain very firm. The 
travellers are all out but are storm staid this 
week. The most noticeable feature is the 
advance in turpentine, which has gone up 
7c. per gal. this last week. The other 
prices are unchanged. We quote : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, S5.87X ; No. 1, $5.50; No. 2. #5. 12^ ; 
No. 3. S4-75 I No. 4, S4-37 1 * in pkgs. 
of 25 lb. and upwards ; >£c. per lb. extra 
will be changed far 12^-lb. pkgs. ; genuine 
dry white lead in casks, $$.12}4. 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb. 
$5- I2 H '< ditto, in kegs of ioolb., $5.50; No. 
1, in casks of 560 lb., S4 ; ditto, kegs o' 
100 lb., $4.50. 

Litharge — Genuine, 6 to 6^c. 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 7% to 8c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $6 to $6 .25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Benzine — In barrel lots, i6^c. per gal. ; 
less quantities, 25c. per gal. 

Paris White — 90c. to Si per 100 lb. 

Whiting — 65c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 35c; in less 
than cases, 40c. per lb. 

Liquid Shellac — Pure orange, in bbls., 
S2 25 to S2.35 ; white, S2.35 to S2.45 per 
gal.; in less quantities, 10:. extra. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., S2.25; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2.40; bulk in bbls., 
S1.90 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 
lb., S2.05 ; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., $2.90. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, Si. 90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, $2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, j?i-2oto $1.30 per 
gal. 

Castor Oil — English, in cases, 9% to 
ioc. per lb. and 10 to ioj^c. for single tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 77c; 
boiled, 80c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 76c; 
boiled, 79c, delivered. To Toronto, 
Hamilton and London, 2c. less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 68c; 2 
to 4 barrels, 67c, delivered. Toronto, 
Hamilton and London ic. less. For less 
quantities than barrels, 5c. per gallon extra 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
6d. and is. Canisters. 

WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England. 

Agent: 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 



COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y. 

Steel Carriage and 

Wagon Jacks, 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Wtb 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BV JOBBERS ATMFRS. PRICES. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

'ff^si -^^L»reeit Variety. 

7 Toilet, Hind, Electric Powerl 

ARE THE BEST. 

Highut duality Grooming and 
Sheep -Shearing Machine*. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

SXND FOB OATALOeim TO 
Xa.rleu Shtlr.r Mfg. Co., Huku, H.H..C8A 





Don't Forget the Name. . . 

NEWMANS INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINGS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 
Will cloaea dooragainst any pressure of wind. Far 
ahead of ordinary door springs pneumatic or other- 
wise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



Oneida Community Goods 

HALTERS, COW TIES, SNAPS, etc., etc., 

in all sizes and styles. May be had of all 
jobbers throughout Canada. 

Faotory— NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. 



Mackenzie Bros. 

HARDWARE 
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS, 

WINNIPEG 
MAN. I 



Trevellers covering Manitoba, 
Northwest Territories and 
British Columbia. 

Correspondence Solicited 



I 



" F>LJl_L_IVIAI\l " 

THOUSER or SKIRT HANGERS. 

TWO ^^ SIZES 




PULLMAN SASH BALANCE CO., 
ROCHESTER. N.Y., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



will be added, and for 5 -gallon packages, 
50c, and 10-gallon packages, 80c. will be 
charged. 

GLASS. 

There is a greatly improved demand for 
glass, both locally and for outside points. 
Prices are unchanged. We quote as 
follows : Under 26 in., $4.25 ; 26 to 
40 in., $4-65; 41 to 50 in., $5 10 ; 51 to 
60 in., $s 35 ; 61 to 70 in., $5.75 ; 
71 to 80, $6.25 ; 81 to 85, $7 ; 86 to go, 
$7.75 ; Toronto, Hamilton and London. 
Terms, 4 months, or 3 per cent. 30 days. 
OLD MATERIAL. 

The market is still very unsettled. Prices 
on coppers have not apparently yet reached 
their bottom figures, for there has been a 
decline of ic. in heavy copper, 2c. in new 
light scrap copper, y t c. in bottoms, 2c. in 
coil wire, ic. in light brass, j£c. in heavy 
yellow brass and i^c. in heavy red 
brass, all owing to the further slump 
in the copper markets in the United 
States. We now are quoting : Agricul- 
tural, 60c. per cwt. ; machinery cast, 
60c. ; heavy copper, 10c. per lb. ; stove 
cast, 40c. ; No. 1 wrought, 50c. per 
100 lb. ; new light scrap copper, 7c. 
per lb.; bottoms, 7X C -! coil wire, 10c; 
light brass, 5c; heavy yellow brass, 
7#c. ; heavy red brass, 8c. ; scrap 
lead, 2^c. ; zinc, 2c. ; scrap rubber, 
6c. ; good country mixed rags, 50 to 
60c; clean dry bones, 40 to 45c. per 
100 lb. 

HIDES. SKINS AND WOOL. 

Trade is steady with nominal prices. We 
quote what is paid by buyers on arrival : 

Hides — We quote : No. 1, green, 7j£c; 
No. 2 green, 6^c; No. 1 green, steers, 8c; 
No. 2 green, steers, 7c; cured, 7% to 
8tfc 

Skins — We quote : No. 1 calfskins, 9c; 
and No. 2, 7c; deacons (dairies) 55 to 60c. 
each ; sheepskins, 65 to 75c. ; deerskins, 
I2# to 14c. per lb. 

Wool — We quote: Fleece, 13c, and 
unwashed, 7 to 8c. per lb. 
SEEDS. 

The foreign demand still drags, but the 
offerings have been very light owing to the 
unfavorable weather. Prices are somewhat 
weaker, red clover and alsike being 25c. 
cheaper. We quote prices paid at outside 
^points : Red clover, 54.75 t0 &S l 5 '< 
alsike, $6.25 to J8 25, and timothy, $2.50 
to ^3.25 per bush. 

PETROLEUM. 

Trade is active in this line and prices are 
steady. We quote : Pratt's Astral, 16 }4 
to 17c. in bulk (barrels, extra) ; American 
water white, 17 to J7}4c. in barrels ; 
Photogene, 16 }4 to 17c. ; Sarnia water 
white, 16 to i6^c. in barrels; Sarnia prime 
white, 14^ to 15c. in barrels. 



ARCADE BRAND 

FILES and 
RASPS 



Have all the superior merits of the 
best Hand-Cut Files. 








Warranted 



FAST CUTTING 
AND SUPERIOR 
TEMPER. 



Arcade Files have 

been manufactured 

for over fifty years and 

have stood the test of time. 



Manufactured by 



NICHOLSON FILE CO. 



(Dominion Works) 



Walter Grose 

Selling Agent, 

MONTREAL. 



PORT HOPE, ONT- 

For Sale by- 
Canada Hardware Co., Montreal. 
Kerr & Robertson, St. John, N.B. 
W. B. Arthur & Co., Halifax, N.S. 
Nelson Hardware Co., Nelson, B.C. 
Codere, Sons & Co., Sherbrooke, P.Q. 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs, 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 

INGERSOLL, ONT. 



There is an active demand for coal and 
coke, but a limited supply, cars enough 
still being lacking. Prices are firm. We 
quote at international bridges : Grate, 
$4.75 per gross ton; egg, stove and nut, $5 
per gross ton ; soft coal, $2.50 to $3.25 in 
bond, according to grade. 



O 



MARKET NOTES. 

Coke plates are 25c. lower. 

Tin is quoted lower at $28 to $29. 

Quotations are lower on both ingot and 
sheet copper. 

The discount on brass has been increased 
to 15 per cent. 

Turpentine has advanced 7c. per gallon 
since last week. 

In old material, there has been a number 
of changes, the unsettled condition of the 
United States copper market pulling down 
the price of heavy copper ic; new light 
scrap copper, 2c; bottoms, y£c; coil wire, 
2c. ; light brass, ic; heavy yellow brass, 
y£c, and heavy red brass, i^c. per lb. 



The merchants of Amherst are closing 
their places of business every week night 
except Saturday, during January and 
February, at 6 o'clock. 



TRADE CHAT. 

N the eve of his departure for the 
West, W. O. Lott, ex-secretary- 
treasurer of the Mowat Hardware 
Co., Limited, Trenton, Ont., addressed a 
letter through The Trenton Advocate thank- 
ing his numerous friends for their past 
favors and patronage. 

Singleton Bros., tinsmiths, of Carleton 
Place, Ont., have dissolved partnership, 
W. R. Singleton continuing. 

The tender of $17,500 made by The 
Canadian General Electric Co. for the 
assets of The Diamond Machine and Screw 
Co. , Limited, Toronto, which is in liquida- 
tion, has been accepted by the Master in- 
Ordinary. 

F. F. Quinn, of the firm of Geo. Stephens, 
Quinn & Douglas, hardware merchants, 
Chatham, Ont., has retired from the 
business, which will be continued by 
Stephens & Douglas. 

On the ground that it is insolvent within 
the meaning of the Dominion Winding Up 
Act, it was moved before Chief Justice 
Meredith, on January 20, that an order be 
granted winding up the Niagara Metallic 
Furniture Co. If the parties cannot agree 
on an interim liquidator, Chief Justice 
Meredith will name one. 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



NOVA SCOTIA MARKETS. 

Halifax, January 20, 1902. 

BUSINESS is fairly good in the hard- 
ware line, and dealers are looking 
forward to a good year's trade. For 
this reason the wholesalers are giving heavy 
orders in anticipation. Another induce- 
ment to order early is that spring delivery 
may be prompt, as all the manufacturers 
are now very busy and hard pressed to get 
out the orders already booked. 

* * * 

On the whole, the market conditions are 
firm, and, prices being generally at asjow 
a record as expected, jobbers and retailers 
have no hesitation in making their stocks 
as complete as possible. The firmness of 
the iron and steel market in general gives 
the idea that there will be little, if any, 

reduction in prices. 

* * * 

Travellers are sending in numerous 
orders, which, if small, swell the general 
aggregate. This is especially so of the 
Cape Breton districts, where the activity in 
the Sydneys, resulting from the iron and 
steel plants, has been a great factor in 
increasing Halifax trade. The railroad 
building, which has been going on there for 
the last year, and will continue more ex- 
tensively next summer, will make Port 
Hood, Port Hastings, Broad Cove, St. 
Peters and other points from there to Louis- 
burg a great field for builders' supplies. 
Many Halifax firms have already large 
connections in this district, and their 
hustling travellers will see that their trade 
is held and increased. 

* * * 

A meeting of the Maritime Provinces 
hardwaremen took place at Truro on Janu- 
ary 16. but they are very reticent as to the 
business transacted. In fact, the delegates 
are as close as oysters. Those present 
were : Ed. A. Everett, T. McAvity, T. C. 
Lee, H. A. Coates, B. J Morris and R. B. 
Emerson, of St. John ; G. S. Troops, P. 
Simmonds, W. B. Arthur, R. F. Stevens, 
A. M. Bell and G. H. Richards, of Halifax. 

* * * 

The first of the year announced a change 
in the well known hardware firm of H. H. 
Fuller & Co., in the admission of George H. 
Richards and W. H. Sterns as members of 
the firm, both of whom have been long 
connected with the business. The former 
entered the business as a boy some 20 years 
ago ; the latter had been bookkeeper for 
the firm for some 10 years. Both are cases 
of strict integrity combined with business 
ability receiving the reward which they 

merit. 

* * * 

The travelers in Cape Breton and along 
the South Shore are always bringing in 



some new story off the road. The latest 
going the rounds is to the effect that one 
morning the landlord asked his latest guest, 
a traveller, how he had slept during the 
night, and if his bed was comfortable ? The 
drummer replied that the bed was comfort- 
able, but that he had not slept, as he was 
troubled with insomnia. The landlord was 
mad ; he called the drummer a pupil of 
Ananias ; he wanted to put him out, and 
finally offered to give the drummer $5 for 
every one of "them bugs " he could find in 
the bed. These drummers are queer chaps 
They either meet with some strange experi- 
ences, or else they have fertile imaginations. 

R. C. H. 



SUPPORTING THE I. B. & O. R. 
EXTENSION. 

THE Lindsay Board of Trade, at a well- 
attended meeting on January 16, 
discussed a communication from L 
B. Howland, general manager of the Iron- 
dale, Bancroft and Ottawa Railway. 

This communication informed the board 
that the above mentioned railway company 
have finally succeeded in securing financial 
backing from a prominent trust company in 
New York, and now were ready to complete 
their line, which had already been built 
from Kinmount on the G. T. R. to a point 
near Bancroft, Ont. , by extending it from 
the latter point to a place at or near Cold- 
well Station on the Canadian Atlantic 
Railway, a distance of 60 miles from the 
end of the completed line. To insure this 
extension a 60 mile grant is required from 
the Dominion and a 45 -mile grant from the 
Ontario Government, the latter having 
already subsidized 15 miles. As some 
difficulty was expected in the attainment of 
this, the support by strong and influential 
resolutions of the Lindsay Board of Trade 
was asked. 

Mr. Howland also appeared before that 
board and pointed out, by the aid of maps, 
that the new line would tap the famous 
corundum mining region, would lead to the 
development of the fine water-power on the 
Madawaska river, and extend through 
Lindsay. Trade, consequently, would be 
greatly attracted in that direction, and the 
assistance of the board would very much 
help in the attainment of that object. 

After considerable discussion, a com- 
mittee, consisting of President J. D. 
Flavelle, R. J. McLaughlin, C. D. Barr, 
Wm. Steers and Secretary Sootheran, was 
appointed to draft memorials to be presented 
to the Dominion and Ontario Governments 
asking that subsidies be granted for the 
proposed extension. 



R. BAILEY & SON 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

STOVE LININGS ?„', "SEE 

All kinds of Fire Brick and Fire Clay Work, 

Paving Tile, etc. 

Wholesale Only. - - Write for parWculars. 

1220 Yonge Street, TORONTO. 



ONTARIO SILVER CO., 

Limited, 
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 



Manufacturers of 



FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 



ELECTRO PLATE. 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 

The Grey and Bruce Portland 
Cement Company of Shallow 
Lake, Limited, 

Manufacturers of 
"HERCULES" BRAND OF 

Portland Cement 

Unsurpassed for Sidewalks, Floors, and all 

work requiring the Highest Grade 

of Portland Cement. 

HEAD OFFICE: OWEN SOUND. 

After Stocktaking 

in the quiet time is the opportunity to equip with 




Bennett's Patent Shelf Box 

Write for our new discount sheets containing 
lower prices and 7 varieties in Shelf Boxes. 

J. S. BENNETT, Patentee and Manufacturer, 

15 MARION ST., TORONTO 



"GLORIA" BULB LIGHTS 

ALL GOOD THINGS ARE IMITATED 

The "Gloria" Light, owing to its remarkable brilliancy 
and durability, has established itself among the retai' 
hardware merchants as the cheapest and best value that 
can be offered to their customers to-day. 

The increasing demand for the "Gloria" Triple Weave 
Mantle and its improved features over the Single Weave 
Mantles convinces merchants that without it they are 
losing trade. 

The "Gloria" Triple Weave Mantle is of our own 
manufacture. We alio carry full line of Incandescent 
Gas Supplies, and would be pleased to send you Price 
List. 

THE UNITED INCANDESCENT LIGHT CO. 

Phone Main 969. 1 Yonge St. Arcade, Toronto. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



27 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, January 20, 1902. 

EVERYTHING now points to a brisk 
spring trade, that will probably open 
earlier than usual. There have 
been^uite a number of changes made in 
the price lists for the week. Steel churns 
have been advanced, the discount being 
now 50 per cent, instead of 55. T and 
strap hinges are lower by 25c. Cut nails 
are lower by 15c. and wire nails 30c. On 
the other hand, manila rope has been 
advanced 50c. per cwt. Paints and oils 
are very quiet, as is usual at this season, 
and the only change to note is a drop of 2c. 
per gal. on linseed oils. 

Price list for the week is as follows : 

Barbed wire, 100 lb S3 30 

Plain twist 3 40 

Staples 3 95 

Oiled annealed wire 10 3 85 

11 3 90 

12 3 95 

13 4 10 
M 4 25 
IS \ 35 

wire nails, 30 to 60 dy, keg 3 25 

16 and 20 335 

10 3 35 

8 3 45 

6 3 5o 

4 3 65 

3 3 9° 

Cutnails, 3oto6ody 305 

" 20 to 40 3 10 

" 10 to 16 3 15 

8 3 20 

6 3 25 

4 3 35 

3 3 7° 

Horsenails, 45 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 65 

No. 2 and larger 4 40 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 9° 

No. 2 and larger 4 40 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 4 95 

No. 2 and larger 4 70 

Bar iron, $2.70 basis. 
Swedish iron, $5.00 basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 25 

Spring steel 3 25 

Machinery steel 375 

Tool steel , Black Diamond , 100 lb 8 50 

Jess op 13 00 

Sheetiron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 10c ib. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 3 75 

28 gauge 4 00 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . . 2 79 

18 to 22 gauge 4 75 

24 gauge 5 00 

26 gauge 5 25 

28gauge 5 50 

Genuine Russian, lb 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 75 

26 gauge 8 00 

28 gauge 8 50 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 11 00 

"IX 13 00 

IXX " 1500 

Ingot tin 33 

Canada plate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 3 75 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 00 

Broken lots 7 50 

Pig lead, 100 lb 6 00 

^JVrought pipe, black up to 2 inch 50 an 10 p.c. 

" Over2inch 50 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger S13 00 

H J 3 5° 

" # and 5-16 13 75 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 16 50 

" % 17 00 

Ya and 5-16 17 50 

Solder 20 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 17 

Axes, chopping % 7 5° to 12 °o 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 87'A 

Round" " 82M 

Flat " brass 80 

Round " " 75 

Coach 57 H P-c 



Bolts, carriage 50 p.c. 

Machine 50 p . c. 

Tire 60 p.c. 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p.c. 

Rivets, iron 50 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 35 

Bluestone, cask lots 55 5° 

Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 70 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz.. $2 50 

No. 1 1 50 

No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra 1 75 

No. 1 1 25 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F. , pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C. F. pistol 5P-C. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge black 16 50 

chilled, 12 gauge 1800 

soft, 10 gauge 21 00 

chilled, 10 gauge 23 00 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 25 

Chilled 675 

Powder, F.F., keg 4 75 

F.F.G 5 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 75 and 2% p.c. 

plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 

PETROLEUM. 

Water white American 

Prime white American 

Water white Canadian 

Prime white Canadian 



25 He- 
24c. 
22c. 

2I^C 



PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 



Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ 62 

Less than barrel lots 67 

Linseed oil, raw 82 

Boiled 85 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor 27 M 

Eldorado engine 26 l A 

Atlantic red ._. 29M 

Renown engine 41 

Black oil 19^ 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 to 74 

Harness oil 65 

Neatsfoot oil $ 1 00 

Steam refined oil 85 

Sperm oil 2 00 

Castor oil per lb. 11 A 

Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 

united inches 2 50 

26 to 40 per 50 ft. 2 75 

41 to 50 " 100 ft. 600 

51 to 60 " " " 650 

61 to 70 per 100-ft. boxes 7 00 

Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 2% 

kegs " 2K 

White lead, pure per cwt. 6 50 

No. 1 " 600 

Prepared paints, pure liquid colors, ac- 
cording to shade and color, per gal. $1.30 toji.go 



NOTES. 

Geo. W. Erb, Western manager for The 
Waterous Engine Works Co., has left for 
an extended eastern trip, combining busi- 
ness with pleasure. 

A recent number of The Manitoba 
Gazette contains notice of the issue of 
letters patent to The Winnipeg Machinery 
Co. The capital is $40,000. 

R, S. Cochrane, Western representative 
of The J. B. Armstrong Manufacturing Co., 
leaves to day for an extended trip to 
Western and Coast points, and will be absent 
about six weeks. 



This season 175,000 tons of ore have 
been shipped from Wabana, N.S., to 
Rotterdam, Holland, by The Nova Scotia 
Steel and Coal Co. 



THE 

PAINTERS 
PERFECT 
WHITE 
LEAD 

is beautifully soft and fine in 
the grain. It mixes well with 
Unseed Oil, forming a creamy 
smooth paint of great cover- 
ing power and undoubted 
durability. Every atom is 
paint — perfect paint — and 
there is no loss or residue 
of any kind. The Painters 
Perfect White Lead has be- 
come very popular every- 
where. Book early to en- 
sure early shipment. 



THE 



CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY 



LIMITED 



Montreal and Toronto. 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING 



AND 



PLUMBING 



-h 

I 



BUILDING PERMITS IN TORONTO. 

OF course, building operations cannot 
be expected to be so brisk in mid- 
winter as in other times of the 
year, still a considerable number of buildings 
are being erected in Toronto. Since last 
Thursday the following permits have been 
taken out from the Toronto City Com- 
missioner's office: Wm. Clark, for a pair 
of brick semi detached two storey and attic 
dwellings on Shaw street, to cost $2,300 ; 
W. J. McRea, for a pair of semi detached 
two storey and attic brick residences on 
Withrow avenue, to cost $6,000 ; The 
Fairies Milling Co., for the erection of a 
one-storey brick store on Dundas street, 
to cost $2,000; Joseph Henderson, for a 
pair of semi detached two storey and attic 
brick dwellings on the corner of Maple 
avenue and Glen Road, to cost $8,500 ; 
Buckenden Bros., for six attached, 
two-storey brick-fronted dwellings with 
roughcast sides and rear on Logan 
avenue, to cost $4,800; The Standard 
Chemical Co., for a one-storey wooden 
shed, covered with galvanized non-corrosive 
iron, on Spadina avenue, to cost $100; S. 
McCord, for a two-storey brick stable in 
rear of 696 Queen street east, to cost $450; 
the Dominion Government, for brick and 
stone alterations to the armouries, on 
University avenue, to cost $2,000; John C. 
Green, for inside alterations of wood and 
glass to his store at 56 Bay street, to cost 
$400; Joseph P. Cameron, for a one storey 
brick addition to his factory in rear of 486 
Yonge street, to cost $300; Miss Hannah 
Thomas, for a pair of semi-detached two- 
storey and attic brick dwellings on Lindsay 
avenue, to cost $3,500, and Andrew 
Nelson, for two pair of two storey and attic 
brick dwellings at 27 33 Lansdowne 
avenue, to cost $10,000. 



A HANDSOME NEW BUILDING FOR 
MONTREAL. 

During the coming year a handsome new 
building of Indiana limestone, four storeys 
in height, is to be erected by R. J. Indes, 
on St. Catherine street west, Montreal. The 
plans call for a structure of the style known 
as French renaissance, the front to be 
relieved by elaborate stone carvings, and 
the whole enriched by a medallion cornice 
of the same material as the main body of 
the building. To the main part of the 
structure will be a fine entrance, with a tile 
floor and marble base, in the rear of which 



will be the main staircase and a passage 
elevator with an iron enclosure. There will 
be two large stores on the ground floor, the 
chief of which will be finished throughout 
in quarter oak, with tapestry fabric on the 
wall, and a heavy oak ceiling. A leading 
feature will be an oak mantel-piece, richly 
carved and set out with solid bronze panels 
and marble. The upper floors of the new 
block will be laid out in business offices, 
and the top will serve as a clubroom or a 
studio. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 
CONTRACTS. 

The John Ritchie Plumbing and Heating 
Co., Limited, Toronto, have secured the 
contract for the remodelling of the plumb- 
ing and heating appliances of a residence 
on 1 5 St. Patrick street, Toronto, for F. W. 
Varey. 



SOME BUILDING NOTES 

M. Packenham will build a new factory 
and store at Dresden, Ont. 

It is reported that W. Renfound will also 
erect a new brick block at Dresden. 

Several warehouses for storing wheat and 
grain have been erected at Qu'Appelle, 
N.W.T. 

John Fost will immediately commence 
work on the erection of a new brick resi- 
dence at Dresden, Ont. 

Tenders for the residence of S. G. Shaw, 
Chatham, Ont., have been opened, and the 
contracts will soon be awarded. 

At Crofton, B.C., contracts have just 
been let for the erection of a new frame 
two storey hotel having accommodation for 
75 guests. 

Henderson & Dorner are preparing 
material for the construction of their new 
hotel at Maple Creek, near Medicine Hat, 
N.W.T. 

At Rapid City, Man., it is proposed to 
submit a by-law to the ratepayers authoriz- 
ing the borrowing of $8,000 for the 
construction of a new four-roomed brick 
schoolhouse. 



TENDERS FOR EXHIBITION BUILD- 
INGS. 

In connection with the proposed new 
Exhibition buildings at Toronto it is an- 
nounced that Gouinlock & Taylor have 
been invited to tender for the Main Building 
for $106,000 ; Beaumont Jarvis for the Art 
Gallery for $10,000 and Grey & Gregg for 
the Dairy Building to cost $14,000. These 



tenders are now before the Parks and Exhi- 
bition Committee of the Toronto City 
Council. 



SEWAGE EXPERIMENTAL STATION. 

ON January 22, a deputation consist- 
ing of representatives from many 
important towns and cities of 
Ontario waited on the Provincial Govern- 
ment with a request that an experimental 
station might be established to ascertain 
how sewage might be disposed of to the 
best advantage. 

The deputation, which was introduced by 
L. J. Breithaupt, M.P.P., consisted of 
Mayor Eden, Aid. Krauz, Aid. Honsberger 
and Mr. George Laing, Berlin ; Mayor 
Wood and Aid. Leitch, Brantford ; Mayor 
Stamp and Aid. Savage, Stratford ; Mayor 
Mearnes and Dr. Rice, Woodstock ; 
Mayor Kennedy and Aid. Barber, Guelph ; 
Mayor Watson, Listowel ; Mayor Ingle and 
Aid. Burrows, Lindsay ; Mayor Hawk and 
Aid. Jaffray, Gait. 

It was pointed out that many towns had 
found this problem very difficult to deal 
with, as many places found difficulty in 
disposing of the sewage so as to prevent 
disease and the creation of nuisances in 
their vicinity. Mayor Stamp explained the 
method they have in use at Stratford, known 
as the septic tank system, which had given 
them general satisfaction. The representa- 
tives from other towns quoted cases where 
their municipalities had gotten into trouble 
through the pollution of streams and otner 
means. Tanneries and pork factories have 
always found it very difficult to dispose of 
their sewage. 

The deputation approved of a suggestion 
made by Aid. Jaffray, of Gait, which was 
for the Government to appoint an engineer 
to consult on such matters with local 
engineers. 

The Premier said that this was a very 
important subject, and a solution of this 
problem might be found by seeking abroad 
or experimenting at home. The subject 
was of such importance as to warrant dis- 
cussion with his colleagues, and he thought 
that they might find their way clear to assist 
Berlin or some other town in making 
experiments. The septic system was cheap 
and they all seemed to have confidence in 
it. He will make an announcement of his 
course in a week or so. 



GARBAGE DESTRUCTOR RECOM- 
MENDED. 

In his first fortnightly report for 1902, 
Engineer Rust recommended to the Toronto 
City Council the construction of a small 
destructor at the Island, the cost of which 
will be about $2,000. This would do away 
with the present unsatisfactory and un- 
sanitary methods now in vogue, concerning 
which many complaints have been made. 
He thinks it advisable that an interim 
appropriation should be made at once, so 
that the building will be ready by May 1 . 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 



r 



^v 



PREPARING TOR 
. PAINT BUSINESS? 



We are — so should you ! It's going to be a big one in 
'02 and there's going to be money in it, too. There will be 
money in it if you get the paint that coaxes money out. 
RAMSAYS PAINT will enable you to get your slice of that 
1902 rush for paint, because it is a paint to coax the money 
out — well advertised — nicely put — neat selling cards — pretty 
colors — everybody knows it — known it for years. RAMSAYS 
PAINT goes on to stay on, to establish a reputation for you, 

for us, for everybody 
using it. We can send 
you a booklet telling 
all about it if you wish, 
or our travellers will run 
to talk with you if you 
say so. RAMSAYS 
PAINT is for business, 
reputation and money. 

A. RAMSAY & SON 

MONTREAL 
The Paint Makers. 

Established 1842. 




BURMAN & SONS' clippers 



Established 1871. 



for Horsemen 



BIRMINGHAM, ENG. "nTT,"? 



iff M&^i 

■} 2 


1 


M 



NO. 297. 



NO. 3— POWER CLIPPER, with "Wrist Joint." 

("The Czar of Russia. 
As supplied to^ The King of Denmark. 
(Earl Roberts, Etc., Etc. 





THE "LEOPOLD" TOILET 



THE "WARWICK" 

CLIPPER. 

Buts over three teeth. 

As supplied to 

His Majesty's 
War Department. 



SEND FOR PRICE LIST AND TERMS. 

To be obtained from all the principal Jobbers throughout 
the Dominion. 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from, and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject." 

CANADIAN PRESS CUPPING BUREAU, 

232 McGUl Street, MONTREAL, QUE. 
Telephone Main 1255. 
10 Front St. East, Toronto. Telephone 2701 




You may be looking for 
a Good 

Pipe Hanger. 

Ask us about 

the"Grabler." 

We send you booklet illustrating 
the different kinds. 

The James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co. 



TORONTO. 



Limited. 



BUSINESS FOR MARCONI. 




View of 

Poldhu Station . 

Cornwall. 

WHENCE THE 

WIRELESS 
SIGNALS 

WERE SENT 



The man in the moon 

Will want to know soon 
Where he can buy ALABASTINE, 

Marconi will say 
It is made in Paris, Canada, 

And is the wall-coating everlasting. 



That dealers on earth 

Know its great worth 
And stock it from Maine to Alaska, 

There is no nonsense, they tell, 
The only wall-coating that will sell 

Is the beautiful and durable ALABASTINE. 



The point that we wish to impress on the trade is, that Marconi is a great man, and that ALABASTI N E 
is great goods— both just now are being extensively advertised. 

ALABASTINE is going to sell, and we hope for Marconi— Well ? 
That his experiments will succeed, 
And he be a benefactor indeed, 

As was the man, who, in the wall-decorating line, 
Invented, developed and manufactured 
CHURCH'S COLD WATER ALABASTINE. 

The trade supplied by Wholesale Hardware and Paint Dealers. Also by 

THE ALABASTINE CO. LIMITED, PARIS, ONT. 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE YEAR OF 1901 IN THE KLONDYKE. 



By James Harold Thompson. 



IT is the history of a " Placer Mining 
Camp " that its life is short and 
eventful, while it lasts, and that it 
springs rocket-like into prominence and 
sinks gradually after having reached its 
years of plenty into a thing of the past. 
The Klondyke has reached the crucial 
year of its existence. " For hope's sake" 
many have continued their confidence in 
the future of Dawson ; the hub of which 
has been the richest placer-mining camp 
of this and possibly any other decade. 
The hope of those interested in commer- 
cial enterprises along the Canadian Yukon 
is the discovery of quartz in paying 
quantities. 

As to the future of the mining district 
which in 1897 so startled the world and 
which since then has been such an abun- 
dant gold producer, known as the Klon- 
dyke mining district of the Northwest 
Territory of Canada, its future depends 
upon the discovery of well-placed quartz. 
It is acknowledged by the conservative 
knowing ones that the days of big pro- 
fits in mining and commercial enterprises 
are past and are only present now in 
reminiscence. Overland and water navi- 
gation from the coast, with its difficul- 
ties, are now subject to modern systems 
of railroad and steamboat transporta- 
tion, and when the Arctic winter has put 
its seal upon this northern country, the 
telegraph daily voices the events of the 
world in Dawson. 

Heretofore merchants and tradesmen 
reaped big harvests, 100 per cent, being 
not an uncommon profit. Yet, it was 
seldom that capital profited its owner 
more than once a year because of naviga- 
tion and railroad facilities. The short 
season beginning in June and ending in 
October, coupled with the lack of tele- 
graphic communication, allowed time tor 
but one shipment during the year. As a 
consequence the necessities of life were 
ofttimes cornered and prices in some in- 
stances reached prodigious heights. As 
competition became a factor many of the 
larger commercial enterprises drew to- 
gether and amalgamated their interests. 
Two companies now control the market. 
In every department of mercantilism com- 
petition is keen, excepting in one which 
is a vejy essential one here. That one is 
the oil trade. The Standard Oil Company 
has complete control, and it retails a 
case of kerosene at $12.50 per case. The 
same case of oil sells for from $2 to $3 
in the States. Merchandise is delivered 
in Dawson for from $70 to $90 per ton, 
just about half of what it was in 1899. 
And yet this price is deemed abnormal by 
the importers and a strenuous effort is 
being made to have it reduced to $50 per 
ton. The cost of mining has been cheap- 
ened by the use of steam and machinery. 



enlarging the yearly output of gold much 
over what it would have been under the 
crude methods of the " sour dough." 

Government regulations have somewhat 
hampered the prospector, but withal he 
has been quite vigilant and has as yet 
discovered nothing since 1898 to perpe- 
tuate the reputation the Klondyke has 
had as a gold producer. Claims upon 
the banner creeks whose reputations as 
gold mines have equaled the wildest hopes 
of the pioneer-prospector are gradually 
being deserted and to-day half, I might 
say two-thirds, of Eldorado Creek has 
been worked out. The same is true of the 
other rich spots of a few years past. The 
life of the camp, from what is in sight, 
can be estimated at this date. 

Prospecting for quartz is occupying the 
attention of many hard-rock miners along 
the Yukon and its tributaries. Upon the 
successful solution of the quartz question 
depends the present prominence of Daw- 
son as a mining camp, and it is the one 
thing talked of and hoped for by the pre- 
sent inhabitants of this district. As yet 
nothing of any permanent value has been 
discovered, although many of the num- 
berless claims staked and recorded are 
being worked quite thoroughly. Com- 
panies have been formed and their stock 
is on the market. Their hope is that the 
present prospects will lead to the sub- 
stantial vein, or the " Mother Lode," as 
it is called. To facilitate the sorting, 
handling and assaying of these prospects 
two fine stamp mills have been erected in 
Dawson and are now crushing quartz 
rock. 

Prior to the discovery of the Klondyke 
district it was found practical to thaw 
the frozen earth to almost any depth by 
the use of wood fires. Hence as the gold 
lies in or above the bed rock ground, 
when the bed rock was 100 feet below the 
surface it could be worked as well as 
that of 25 feet. The winter season being 
the longest and dryest season it became 
the busy season for the miner. But steam 
and machinery have reversed this order 
of things, and as in the flays of the old- 
est " sour-dough " miner, summer, al- 
though the season is but six months 
long, has become the time of activity. 
The majority of heavy operators discon- 
tinue altogether the operation of their 
properties and spend the winter months 
at their ancestral homes, wherever they 
may be. As a consequence, the work ac- 
complished this winter will not compare 
at all favorably with that done during 
the preceding winters. It also means a 
busy summer season for 1902. Consider- 
ing those changes, the consenus of opin- 
ion of those conversant with this dis- 
trict is that the output of gold will de- 
crease from this year. 



Gold mining will continue here for some 
time. This is the history of similar 
camps. Capital will gradually withdraw, 
and individuals who will be content with 
wages for their labor will work the old 
workings. These are known as' " s, ip- 
ers " in the vernacular of the miner. 

The development of the unknown 
resources of the vast land known as 
Alaska and the Northwest Territory 
should be of constant interest to the 
farmer, merchant and manufacturer of 
the United States and Canada. Directly 
and indirectly it is of vital importance 
to these mother countries. The actual 
necessities of the man living next door, 
too, and within the Arctic circle will sup- 
port a larger portion of labor than the 
similar necessities of any individual liv- 
ing in any other portion of the globe. 
Good, pure food ; plenty of it ; abun- 
dance of well-made clothing are absolute 
necessities for the health and preserva- 
tion of life in this cold climate. If peo- 
pled as it should be, were the resources 
of this vast territory opened up in a lim- 
ited degree, the commercial world of the 
North-American continent would have a 
market open to their products which 
would be the surest in times of depres- 
sion, the most profitable and congenial 
for the absorption of the congested 
material. 

Experiments have proved that the hard- 
ier cereals and vegetables can be success- 
fully raised within the Arctic circle, but 
the season is so short that competition 
in this line will not become a factor for 
many years, The advent in the manufac- 
turing line, factories, etc., is not to be 
considered. Beef has thus far come from 
the Western States and British Columbia, 
and the winters are found too severe for 
stock-raising. 

Legislation can greatly facilitate the 
work of those who are destined to de- 
velop and pioneer the many industries 
which will some day flourish here. — 
Scientific American. 



WAREHOUSES AT WINNIPEG AND 
VANCOUVER. 

The Francis-Frost Co., Limited, Toronto, 
has made wonderful strides in placing its 
"Ark" Brand Paint. Last fall they estab- 
lished a warehouse in Vancouver, and thus 
relieved the Toronto house of the Coast 
trade. Later, they were compelled to seek 
larger premises at headquarters, in order to 
cope with the Ontario trade, and now they 
have found it necessary to place a ware- 
house in Winnipeg to meet the steadily- 
increasing demand in Manitoba and the 
Territories. 

As Hardware and Metal noted a 
couple of weeks ago, The Francis- Frost 
Co., Limited, Toronto, has recently issued 
a handsome catalogue. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



31 



W^E have 
the nic- 
est set of Hose 
samples ever 
shown to the 
Canadian Jt 
trade. Don't 
fail to see 
them. 



HOSE 

GARDEN 

STEAM 

SUCTION 

ETC. 

Send for samples and quotations. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



\\^E make 
Hose of 
all kinds for all 
purposes. Our 
equipment is 
the most mod- 
ern and our 
goods are per 
fection. 



THE DURHAM RUBBER CO., limited 

Bowmanville, On*. 



REED'S PIPE TOOLS 




jl^-JV Steamfitting and 



^ 



V 



Hardware Specialties. 




PIPE STOCKS AND DIES. 



Standard 

Roller Pipe 

Cutter. 



. . . For Prices and Catalogues, write 



The Fairbanks Company 



747 to 749 

Craig Street, 




Standard 
Three Wheel 
Pipe Cutter. 




32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



DECLINE IN U.S. PIG IRON OUTPUT. 

THE last week's issue of The Iron 
Age, in discussing the number of 
blast furnaces in operation, says : 
" The furnace capacity working on January 
i reflects to some extent the troubles which 
have beset the managers during the last two 
months of the year. Quite a number of 
stacks have been blown out, and others 
have been banked again and again during 
December. Stocks of anthracite and coke 
iron show little change so far as the total is 
concerned. This is due to the fact that some 
of the makers have been unable to ship 
their current make, and, in some cases, 
notably in the South, have accumulated 
some iron. It is probable that if figures 
were available for consumers* stocks a 
considerable absorption of iron would be 
shown. 

" The weekly capacity of the furnaces in 
blast on January i compares as follows with 
that of the preceding periods : 

Capacity 
Furnaces Per Week. 
in Blast Gross Tons. 

January 1, 1902 i64 298.460 

December), 1901 266 324,761 

Novemberl 259 320.824 

October 1 2(6 307.982 

Septemter 1 255 299.861 

August 1 257 3)3,817 

Julyl «9 31 °. 95 ) 

June 1 J5S S-4,505 

May 1 256 301,1:5 

April 1 253 i93,676 

Maroh 1 '-48 292,899 

February 1 245 278 258 

January 1 33 250,351 

December 1, 190) 211 2^8.846 

" The position of furnace stocks, sold and 
unsold, as reported to us, was as below on 
January i, as compared with the five 
preceding months, the same furnaces being 
represented as in former months. This 
does not include the holdings of the steel 
works producing their own iron . 

Stocks. Aug. 1. Sept 1. Oct. 1. 

Anthracite and coke 328,787 318,069 299,824 

Charcoal 58,542 62,005 61,769 

Totals 387,329 380,074 361,593 

Stocks. Nov. 1. Dec. 1. Jan. 1. 

Anthracite anil coke 223,089 181,021 179,993 

Charcoal 50,162 42,441 36,144 

Totals 273,251 123,462 216.137 



appointment to such an important and 
lucrative position, and wishing him all suc- 
cess in his new sphere." 



GOING TO CHINA. 

W. P. Millar, manager of the stove and 
furnace department of The James Smart 
Manufacturing Co., Brockville, since August 
1895, has resigned to accept the position of 
superintedent of agencies for the China 
Mutual Insurance Co., of Shanghai, China. 
Mr. Millar expects to leave Brockville 
about February 1 5, but his family will remain 
there for a time at least. The Brockville 
Recorder says : " Mr. Millar's departure 
from Brockville will be regretted by a large 
circle of friends formed during the time of 
his residence here, but who will join The 
Recorder in congratulating him on his 



THE FIRST IRON VESSEL IN 
GREAT BRITAIN. 

By Ansley Irvine. 

IT is interesting to note that it was as 
early as the year 1809 that Robert 
Dickenson, the eminent inventor, first 
suggested to the Admiralty a scheme by 
which the old wooden ships of the Royal 
Navy were to be gradually replaced by 
vessels built of iron, and thus make the 
English fleet incomparably stronger than 
any combination that could be brought 
together by foreign nations. 

The proposed innovation was promised 
due consideration, and, in 1830, 21 years 
afterwards, the conclusion arrived at by the 
Admiralty was that iron vessels would be 
practically useless in the line of action and 
totally unmanageable in a storm ! Absurd 
as the assertion now appears, it was, never- 
theless, ardently supported by Dr. Lardner, 
a scientific authority, who said the idea was 
perfectly chimerical, and that there was 
about as much chance of an iron boat 
reaching New York as there was of its 
voyage to the moon. 

A fierce storm of invective and derision 
was waged against all who had the temerity 
to hold an opinion contrary to the Admiralty 
and their "scientific" supporters. But 
Thomas Wilson, a young Scotch boat- 
builder, ignored the bigoted opposition, 
and, in 18 16, commenced to build a boat of 
iron at Fasken, Scotland. She was named 
the Vulcan. Her dimensions were 60 ft. in 
length, 12 ft. in breadth and 5 ft. in depth. 



All the plates, rivets and angle irons were 
made over the anvil by Wilson and his 
blacksmith. The plates were fixed perpen- 
dicularly, or boiler-fashion , not horizontally, 
as in modern iron ships. The boat was 
specially constructed for the passenger 
service on the Monkland Canal, and plied 
between Port Dundas and Lock No. 16. — 
Scientific American. 



T 



FREOERICTON BOARD OF TRADE. 

HE Fredericton, N.B., Board of Trade 
recently held its annual meeting with 
President Edgcombe in the chair. 

The president, in his address, noted the 
success of the Provincial Exhibition, which 
was mainly owing to the support of the 
local board of trade, the movement to 
establish a steamship line between Frederic- 
ton and Woodstock and the dredging of 
their harbor front last summer. He urged 
the construction of a union depot for the 
different railways centreing in Frederickton. 

In the Tourists' Association report, next 
presented, mention was made of the Sports- 
man's Shows in New York, Chicago and 
Philadelphia since the last annual meeting 
of the board, at which were distributed 
large numbers of the Fredericton booklet. 
It was stated that a new edition of their 
tourist booklet, comprising 10,000 copies, 
was issued in July last, and the visit of the 
Upper Province Press Association was 
noted. They (the tourist committee) had 
also addressed a letter to the Chief Com- 
missioner of Public Works of New Bruns- 
wick suggesting that a book in which 
visitors could write their names and 
addresses be placed in the Parliament 
Buildings, which was acted upon. 

The treasurer reported receipts of $971.02 
and an expenditure of 9608.35, leaving a 
balance of $272 67. 



Apollo galvanized iron 
commands more money and 
shorter credit — at wholesale 
— than any other — but saves 
the worker money. 

American Sheet Steel Company, New York 

Representatives for Canada 

B. & S. H. Thompson & Company 

26 St. Sulpice Street 

Montreal 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 



.. 



JJ 



MIDLAND 

BRAND 

Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



"The Peerless" 



is the best Bolster Spring ever 
produced. A fine line for the 
hardware trade, write us For Prices, 



Write for Prices to Sales Agents 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

or to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 




James Warnock & Co. 



Gait, Ont. 



CUKRE^T MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



January 24, 1902. 
These prices are for Bach qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots. 100 lb. 29 00 30 00 
Tlnplates. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright 

M.L.S., equal to Bradley Perboi 

I.O., uaualaizes $6 75 

I.X., " 8 25 

I.X.X.. " 9 75 

Famous— 

1.0 6 75 

I.X 8 25 

I.X.X 9 75 

Raven ft Vulture Grades— 

I.O., usual sizes 5 00 

I.X., " 6 00 

.XX " 7 00 

t.XXX., " 8 00 

D.0..12%xl7 « 50 

D.X 5 25 

D.X.X 600 

Coke Plates— Bright 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.O., usual sizes 4 25 

I.O., special sizep, base 4 60 

20x28 900 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Deaa or J. G. Grade— 

I.O.,2Qx28, 112 sheets 8 50 

I.X..TerneTln 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates 

Cookley Grade— Per lb. 
X X.,14x56,50shee bxs") 

" 14x60, " V .... 06% 
" 14x65, " ) 
Tinned Sheets 

72x30 unto 24 gauge 07% 

36 " 08 

Iron and Steel. 

Common Bar, per 100 lbs.... 195 2 05 

Refined " " 2 45 

Horse Shoe Iron 2 40 

Hoop steel, 1% to 3 in. base, 

Sleigh Shoe Steel " base .... 2 10 

TlreSteel 2 30 2 50 

Reeled Machinery 3 00 

ToeOalkSteel 2 85 3 00 

T. Firth & Go's tool steel.per lb 12% 13 

Jessop's tool Steel .... 14 

Morton's tool steel C 12% 13 

— Black Diamond and " B.C." 

•> tool steel 10 11 

Ohas. Leonard's tool steel.... 08 09 

Drill Steel, per lb C8 10 

Boiler Tabes. 

IK-lnnh 12% 

I* •• :... 016 

»% •< "....; 020 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

Vlinoh 2 50 2 60 

Sit inch 2 60 2 70 

«/, Inoh and thloker 2 50 2 60 

Black Sheet*. 

Com. D.F1. 

I8gau«« 285 3 00 

|.nw 2 85 3 CO 

SltoM " 2 95 3 25 

S " 3 05 3 50 

1 " 3 15 .... 



OanadaPlatei. 

All dull, 52 sheets 3 00 

Halfpolished 3 10 

All bright 3 75 

Black pipe— Iron Pipe. 

Per 1C0 Feet. 

% inch 4 65 

% " 3 40 

% " 345 

% " 3 70 

\ " 385 

1 " .... 5 40 

1% " 7 70 

1% " 9V0 

8 " 12 50 

2% " 24 00 

3 " 28(0 

3% " 36 00 

4 " 43C0 

4% " 5C 00 

5 " 57 00 

6 " 7300 

Galvanized pipe — 

% inch 5 15 

% " 5 50 

1 " 7 95 

1% " ... 10 80 

1% " 1295 

2 " 17 35 

5 p. c. off to preferred buyers. 

Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 
G C. Comet. Amer. Head. 

16 gauge 

18 to 24 gauge 4 05 3 75 .... 4 05 

26 " 4 25 4 00 .... 4 25 

28 ." 4 50 4 25 .... 4 50 

Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 

28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 

Chain. 

ProofOoll,S-16in., per 1001b 

% •• " 7 85 8 10 

5-16 " " 4 95 5 25 

% " " 4 35 4 60 

7-16 " " 4 15 4 40 

% •' •• 4 00 4 25 

9-16 " " 3 99 4 15 

% " " 3 80 4 05 

# •• •' 3 85 4 10 

Halter kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 

5 p.o. 

Cow ties 40 p.o. 

Tie-out chains 65 p.c. 

Stallfixturea 35 p.o. 

Trace chain 45 p.o. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, dis- 
count 35 p.c. 
Jaok ohain, brass, aingle and double, dis- 
count 40 p.o. 

Copper. 

Ingot Per 100 lb. 

English B. 8., ton lots 15 00 

Lake Superior 

Bare. 
Out lengths round, % to % in. 23 TO 25 CO 
" round and square 

lto2inohes.... 23 00 25 00 
Sheet. 
Plain, 14 o»., and light, 16 

oz., 14x48 and 14x60 24 00 24 50 

Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., irregular sizea 24 50 25 00 

Tinned copper sheets 26 00 

Planished ........ ••■• 32 00 

Braziers (Insheets.) 

4x6ft. 25 to 30 lbs. ea..perlb 25 

" 35 to 45 " •••• 24 

50-lb. and above, .... 23 

Boiler and T.K. Pitta 

Plain Tinned, per lb 28 

Bpun.perlb u 3i 

Copper Ware. 
Discount, 50 per cent. 

Brail. 
Rod and Sheet. 14 to 30 gauge, 10 peroent. 

Sheeta, hard-rolled. 2x4 23 

Tubing, baae. per lb « *'h 



Zlne Spelter 

Foreign, perlb (5% 06 

Domeatio " 

Zine Sheet. 

5-cwt.oaaks 6 CO 6 25 

Partcaaka 06 0614 

Lead. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb .. 3 50 3 7> 
Bar.l lb "" 05 

Sheeta, 2 1 /, ll.a. aq. ft., by .... 06% 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs., " .... 06 

Note.— Cut sheeta % cent per lb. extra. 
Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists 
at 7c. per lb. and 35 p.c. dis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Notb.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
J-ft. lengths lists at 7% cents. 
Shot. 

Common, $6.50 per 100 lb. ; chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb. ; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 22% pc. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 oer cent, cash, freights equalized. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 

Discount, 60 and 10 per cent, on medium and 
extra heavy, and 60 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Perlb. Perlb. 

Bar half-and-half, guarant'd .... 19 

Bar half-and-half, commer'l .... 18V, 

Refined 18 

Wiping., 17% 

Antimony. 

Cookson'e, per lb 10 11 

White Lead. Per 100 lb. 

Pure 5 87yi 

No.l 5 50 

No.2 5 12% 

No.3 < J5 

No.4 * 37% 

Munro'a Select Flake White 6 37% 

Elephant and Decoratora' Pure 6 12% 

Brandram's B B. Genuine 8 25 

" " No. 1 7 50 

Above prices are for 25 lb. and upwaids. 
Bed Lead. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $4 75 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 00 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 4 25 

No. 1,1001b. kegs, perowt 4 50 

White Zinc. 

Extra Red Seal 06 08 

No.l 05% C7 

No.2 05 06 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, oasks 5 25 

Pure, kegs 5 50 

No. l.caaka 5 00 

No.l, kegs 5 25 

Prepared Paints. 
In %, % and 1 gallon tina. 

Pure, per gallon 125 

Second qualities,per gallon 110 

Barn (in bbls.). 60 90 

The Sherwin-Williams Painta 140 

Canada Paint Co's Pure 125 

Toronto Lead & Color Co's Pure 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy'a Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 20 
Colon In Oil. 
25 lb. tina, Standard Quality. 

Venetian Red, per lb 04% 06 

Chrome Yellow 12 14 

Golden Ochre 08 10 

French " 06 

Marine Black 09 

OhromeGreen 10 

French Imperial Green 12 

Sign Writers' Black 16 

Burnt Umber 11 

" Sienna 11 

Raw Umber 011 

" Sienna 11 



Colors, I>ry. 

Common Ochre bbls 120 130 

Yellow Ochre J.F.L.S.), bbla ... 2 00 

Yellow Ochre (La Belle) 1 15 1 25 

Brussels Ochre 2 00 

Venetian Red (best), bbl .... 1 75 2 00 

English Oxides, per owt 3 00 3 25 

Amerioan Oxides, bbls 1 25 2 00 

Canadian Oxides, Ibis 1 25 1 75 

Super MagnetioOxides,93p.o. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" Umber, " " 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Black, pure 09 

Chrome Yellows, pure 18 

Chrome Greens, pure, perlb. 0(9 10 

Golden Oobre 04 ti5 

Ultramarine Blue in 28-lb.. 

boxes, per lb 06 18 

Fire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb .... 100 

Genuine Eng. Litharge, perlb .... 07 

Mortar Color, per 100 lb 125 160 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45 lb. (8 10 

Whiting, bbl 55 60 

English Vermillion in 30-lb. bags. 95 
Paris Green. per lb. 

Petroleum Casks 16% 

Arseoie Kegs 17 

50-lb. and luu-lb. drums 17% 

25-lb. drums. . .■ 18 

1-lb packages 18% 

%-lb. do 20% 

1-lb tins 19% 

%-lb do 21% 

F.O.B. Montreal. Terms— 3 p. c. off 30 
days, or 4 mos. from date of de ivery. 
Bine Stone. 

Casks, for spraying, per lb 07 

100-lb. lots, do. per lb 08 

Putty. 

Bulkinbbls 1 90 

Bulk in less quantity 2 05 

Bladdersin bbls 2 25 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose 2 40 

Bladders in 25-lb. tins 2 36 

Bladders in 12%-lb. tins 2 65 

Bladders in bulk or tine less than 1001b2 90 
Varnishes. 

In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. net. 

Carriage, No. 1 150 160 

Pale Durable body 4 10 4 25 

" rubbing 2 85 3 00 

Gold Size, Japan 2 85 3 00 

No. 1 Brown Japan 85 

Elastic Oak 1 50 

Furniture, extra 1 25 

No.l 85 

Hard Oil Flniah 165 175 

Light Oil Finish 140 160 

Demar 1 70 1 80 

Shellao, white 2 3. 2 46 

" orange 2 25 2 35 

Turpentine Brown Japan, 125 

" Black Japan.... 85 90 

" No. 1.. 70 75 

Elastilite Varnish 1 gal. can, each, $3.00. 

Granitine Floor Finish per gal., $2.75. 

Maple Leaf Coach Enamels ; Size 1, $1 20 
Size 2, 70c. ; Size 3, 40c. each. 
Castor Oil. 

East India, in cases, per lb. . I9 l / S 10 

" " amalllots 10 10% 

Cod Oil, Etc. 

CodOilpergal 50 55 

PureOlive 1 20 

" Neatsfoot 90 

Glue. 

Common 08% 08 

French Medal 14 14 1 /, 

Cabineteheet 12 

White, extra 18 

Gelatine 22 30 

Strip 18 

Coopera 19 

Huttner 



34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



; 



Joseph Rodgers & Sons 

m Limited 



t 
t 
t 

j JAMES HUTTON & CO., MONTREAL 



SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. 

Each blade of our Goods bears the 
exact mark here represented. 



SOLE AGENTS 

IN CANADA. 




HARDWARE. 

Ammunition. 

Cartridges. 

B. B Caps Dom. 50 and 5 per cent 

Rim Fire Pistol, din. 40 p. o., Amer. 

Kim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5 p. o. 

OintralFire Pistol and Rifle, 10 p.o. Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes Dom. 
30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 per cent. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer. 
add 5 p.c. to list. B.B. Caps, discount 40 
per cent. Amer. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap' and 
" Dominion " grades, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 p o. advance on list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 percent.; American, $1.60. 
Wads per lb. 

Best thiok white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bags 1 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-lb. bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thiok white card wads, in boxes 

of 5J0each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin oard wads, in boxes of 1,000 

eaoh, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

eaoh, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 
each. 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 1C gauges 70 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5and6gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 

Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 10 3 4 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 09'Z 

Brook's, " " " .... 11% 

Angers . 

Gilmour'B, discount 65 and 5 p.o. off list. 
Axes. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 11 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 p.o. 

Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boy's Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Bestquality 13 00 15 00 

Batb Tubs. 

Zinc :•■• . 600 

Copper, discount 15 p.c. off revised list 

Baths. 

Standard Enameled. 

5>/,-inch rolled rim, 1st quality 25 00 

2nd " 21 00 

Anti-Friction Metal. 

"Tandem" A..r. per lb. 27 

B " 21 

C " uy 2 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 

Frictionless metal, per lb 23 

SYRACCJSE SMELTING WORKS. 

Aluminum, genuine 41 

Dynamo 27 

Special i2 

Aluminum, 99 p.c. pure "Syracuse" . . 45 
Phosphorme anti-friction met*l 25 

Bells. 

Hand. 

B'ass, 60 per cent. 
Niokel, 55 per cent. 



• Cow. 
American make, disoount 66% per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant'B 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro',di80ount 45 per cent. 
Farm. 

Amerioan, eaoh 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, perdoz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 60 percent. 
Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 
No. 1, not wiier than 6 io., 60 10 and 10 p.c. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 p c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen. , net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, perdoz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, pergross 2 25 5 20 

Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 12 

Boltsand Nuts . Percent. 

Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list) 55 and 5 

" " full square ($3.40 list) 60 and 5 

" " Norway iron ($3 list) . 60 and 5 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 55 and 5 

Plough Bolts 55 and 5 

Blank Bolts 60 

Bolt Ends 60 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 70 

Coach Screws, cone point 70 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 3%c per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes. 4c. per lb. off. 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c. 

Nuts, in 50 lb. lots Vic per lb extra in less 
than 50 lb lots, %e. extra. 

Boot Calks. 

Small and medium, ball, per M 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 6 2% percent. 

Broilers . 

Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dls., 65 to 67% percent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent 

Henis,No.8, " 6 00' 

Henis, No. 9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Batchers' Cleavers. 

German, perdoz 6 00 1100 

Amerioan, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Tarred felt, per 100 lb 1 70 

R.ady roofing, 2-ply, not under 4) lb. 

per rol 1 8i 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 65 lb. 

per roll 1 10 

Carpet fait, per ton 45 00 

Dry sheathing, per roll, 400 sq ft 3"» 

Tar sheathing, " " " 45 

Dry fibre " " " 55 

Tarred fibre, " " " f5 

O.K. 4 IX. L., ' 70 

Resin-sized. " n " 41 

Oiled sheatih g, " 600 " l io 

" " " 400 " 70 

R of coa'ing in birrels, per gal 17 

' " small packages 25 

Refi ed tar, per barrel 4 50 

Coal tar, " 4 00 

Cjal tar, less than ba»rels, per gal... 15 

Roofing pit h, per 100 lb 85 

Bull Rings. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass net revised 1st, 



Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 60 per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Loose Pin, dis. 65, 10 and 2 1 ■ per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per o nt. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

Amerioan, per doz 100 150 

Bullard's, per doz 6 50 .... 

Castors. 

Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% percent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, per gross 8 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 25 2 75 

English " 3 00 3 15 

Belgian " 2 50 2 75 

Canadian hydraulio 125 150 

Chalk. 
Carpenters Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per cwt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon, per gross • 014 18 

Chisels . 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Warnock's, dis. 70 per cent. 
P. S. & W. Extra 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 

Churns. 
Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8— 
No. 1, §8.50— .Vo. 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00— 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames — 20c. each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 56 
p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 54 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days. 
Clips. 
Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets Net. 

Plain York or Ontario Syphon Jet. $9 65 
Emb. York or Ontario Syphon Jet. 10 20 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Elgin orTeu. SyphonWashout 6 00 
Emb. Elginor Teu. Syphon Washout 6 60 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic, plain 9 60 
" " " " emb. 10 20 

Plain Richelieu 4 00 

Emb. Richelieu 4 25 

Connections 1 25 

Low Down Oat. Sy. Jet, plain 1170 

" " emb'd 12 30 

Closet connection 1 25 

BasinsP.O., 14 in 70 

" oval, 17 x 14 in 150 

" 19x15 in ... 2 25 

Compasses, Dividers, Etc. 
American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 

Cradles, Grain . 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per cent. 
Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. & D.,No. 3, per pair 17% 

" 5, " 22% 

6, " 15 

Boynto pattern " 20 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.c.) 2 00 

Coil. perdoz 88 160 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 
Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent 
Carpeaters, dis. 70 per cent. 
Drills. 
Hand and Breast. 
Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 
DRILL BITS. 
Morse, dis., 37% to 40 per cent. 
Standard dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per oent. 

Faucets . 

Common, cork-lined, dis. 35 per cent. 

ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) per doz- 

5 and 6-inch, common 1 2n 

7-inoh 1 35 

Polished, 15c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 45 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per oent. 



FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 
FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 70 and 10 per cen 

Arcade 70 " 10 " 

Kearney * Foot 70 " 10 " 

Dipston's 70 " 10 " 

American 70 " It " 

J. Barton Smith 7" " 10 " 

McClellan 70 " 10 " 

Eagle 70 " 10 " 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 6). 10 and 5 

Royal 80 " 

Globe 70 to 75 

Black Diamond, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 p.c 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 
Nicholson File Co 's "Simplicity" file handle , 
per gross, 8flc to $1.50. 

GLASS— Window— Box Price. 





Star 


D. Diamond 


Size United 


Per 


Per 


Per 


Per 


Inches. 


50 ft. 


100 ft 


50 ft. 


100 ft 




2 20 


4 25 




6 25 


26 to 40 


2 40 


4 65 




8 75 


41 to 50 




5 10 




7 50 


51 to 60 




5 35 




8 50 


61 to 70 




5 75 




S 70 


71 to 80 




6 23 




11 00 


81 to 85 




7 00 




12 55 


86 to 90 




7 75 




15 00 


91 to 95 








17 50 


96 to 100 








20 50 


101 to 105 








24 00 


K6toll0 








27 50 



GAUGES 

Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, each... 165 
HALTERS. 

Rope, % per gross 

" % " 

" %to% 

Leather, 1 in., per doz 3 87% 

" l%in., " 5 15 

Web, —perdoz 187 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis. 5 to 10 per cent. Can. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic, perdoz 110 

Sledge. 

Canadian, per lb 07% 08X 

Ball Pean. 

English and Can., per lb 22 

HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz. net 150 

Store door, per doz 1 00 

Fork. 
C. & B. , dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. & B. , dis. 40 per cent. rev. ist. 
Saw. 

American, perdoz 1 00 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 40 percent. 

Oross-Cut Saws. 
Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns. 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered- 
No. 11, 5-ft. run 

No.11%, 10-ft.run 

No. 12, 10-f t.run 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 2100 

Lane's O.N. T. traok, per foot 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
Discount, 70 per cent. 

HATCHETS. 
Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cen 



2 40 



9 00 
14 00 

4 00 

5 20 
2 45 



dis. 



1 2b 



25 



2 00 
1 50 



1 25 

4 

3 ?'. 



8 40 
10 80 
12 60 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



35 



USE PHOSPHORINE ANTI-FRICTION METAL 



It is the new dis- 
covery. Ask for 
particulars. 

It is the only 
Anti-Friction 
Metal known to be 
chemically pure. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nlckle, etc., always In stock. 



CANADIAN WORKS, MONTREAL, P.Q. 
AMERICAN " SYRACUSE, NY. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, dia. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 

Heavy T and atrap,4-in., per lb 06% 

5-in., " .... 06% 
6-in., " .... 06 
8-in., " .... 05% 
" 10-in., " .... 05y, 
Light T and strap, dia. 65 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

6 to 10 in., per 100 lbs 4 25 

13 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 25 

Per gro. pairs. 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 
Garden, Mortar, etc., dia. 50 and lOp.c. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Disoount 45 and 5 per cent. 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Bird Cage, perldoz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 100 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can. ch>. 
it A per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat.disoount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Sorew, bright, dia. 55 per oent. 
HORSE NAILS. 
1 'C'brand 50 and 7%p.o.off new list 1 Oval- 
"M" brand 50, 10 and 5 percent. J head 
Countersunk, 60 per oent. 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal. 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 
Light, medium and heavy... 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 60 3 85 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

F.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 p o. off list, June 1899. 
ICE PICKS. 

Star per doz 3 03 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.c. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lb 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.o. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Can., dis., 45 p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N.P.,per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz.... 6 00 9 00 
Shutter, porcelain, F. 4 L 

screw, per gross 130 4 00 

White door knjbs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and 1(1 per cent. 
LAMP WICKS. 
.Disoount, 60 per cent. 
P LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast, perdoz... 7 00 

No. 3 "Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 00 

No.0 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined, perdoz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 I 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

All glass 120 130 

LINES. 

Fish per gross 105 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.o. 

Russel* Erwin, per doz 3 00 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 



Padlock. 
English and Am. per doz.... 50 6 00 

Scandinavian, " 100 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

MACHINE SCREWS. Iron and Brass. 
Flat head discount 25 p.c. 
Round Head discount 20 p.c. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' per doz 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory, perdoz. 125 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Oaulkingeach 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian, per doz 5 50 6 50 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 
Disoount, 25 percent. 

NAILS. 
Quotations are : Cut. Wire. 

2dand 3d $3 35 $3 55 

3d 3 00 3 22 

4and5d 2 75 3 05 

6and7d 2 65 2!0 

8and9d 2 50 2 70 

10andl2d 2 45 2 65 

16and20d 2 40 2 60 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 35 2 55 

Wire nails in carlots are 92 50 
Galvanizing 2c. per lb. net extra. 
Steel'Cut Nails 10c. extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 75 p.c. 
Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barrel nails, dis. 25 per cent 
NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 185 3 50 

NAIL SETS. 
Square round, and octagon 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 10 

POULTRY NETTING. 
2-in. Mean 19 w.g., dis. 6 • p.o. 
2-in. Mtsh, 18 w.g. and heav er, 50 and 10 p.c. 

OAKUM. Per 100 lb. 

Navy 6 00 

U.S. Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Water White (U.S.) 16 1 /, 

Prime White (U.S.) 15% 

Water White (Can.) 15 

Prime White (Can.) 14 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oil 
car, with pump, 5 gal., 

per doz 10 00 

Zinc>nd tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 125 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 percent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Duffer in pattern pails, dis . 45 p.c. 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 40 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets. dis. 40 p.c. 
6, lu and 14-qt. flaring pails, dis. 40 p.c. 
Creamer cans, dis. 40 p.c. 
PICKS. 

Perdoz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS, 
eoroelain head, per gross... 175 3 00 
Brasshead " .... 40 100 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 

PLANES. 
Wood, benoh, Canadian dis. 40 per cent. 

American dis. 50. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American 7% 
to 40 per oent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English, per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 
Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.c. 
Button's Imitation, perdoz.. 5 00 9 00 
German, per doz 60 2 60 



PLUMBERS' BRASS GOODS. 
Standard Compression work, dis. 60 p.c. 
"J.M.T." Cushion work, dis £0 p.c. 
Fuller work, dis. 65 p.c. 
6 doz. lots and over of the above, extra dis. 

10 pc. 
Roueh Stops and Stors and Wa hers, dis. 

60 p c. With, in lots of 2 doz. and over, 

an extra dis. of 10 p.c. 
"J.M.T.'' Globe, Agnle and Check Valves, 

dis 55 p.c. 
Standard Gl^Te, Angle and Check Valves, 

dis. 60 p.c 
"J M T." Radiator Valves dis. 55 p c. 
Standard " ' dis., 60 p.c. 

Patent Quick Opening Valves, diB. 65 p.c. 

and 10 p c 
No. 1 compression bath cock, net . . 2 00 

No. 4 2 00 

No. 7, Fuller's 2 ?0 

No 4%, " 2 35 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

cock, hot and cold, per doz. 15 00 

P-tent Compression Cushion, bath 

c-ek No. 2208 2 25 

POWDER. 
Velox Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 

lOOlb.orless 85 

1,0001b. or more 80 

Net 30 days. 
PRESSED SPIKES. 
Diecount ;5 per ceot. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, perdoz 55 100 

Axle 22 33 

Screw 027 1 00 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 180 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers, per doz 100 185 

Conductor's ' 9 00 15 00 

Tinners', solid.per set 00 72 

-■ hollow pet inch 00 100 

RANGE EOILERS. Net. 

Dominion, 35 " 6 75 

40 " 7 75 

Ronald's Galvanized 30 gallons 6 50 

35 " .... 7 50 
40 " .... 8 50 

Copper, 31 gallons !5 00 

■' 35 " 29 00 

" 40 " S3 00 

RAKES. 
Wood, lOpercent. 

RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Elliot's * 00 18 Ot 

Geo. Butler 4 Co.'s 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 1100 

" KingCutter 12 50 50 00 

Wade 4 Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile & Quack's 7 00 12 00 

REGISTERS. 

Discount 40pe cent 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 

and 10 per cent. 
Iron Burrs, liscount 55 per cent. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons . %c. 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, lc 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets 4 Burrs, 35 and 5 p.c. dis 

and cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets 
%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
RIVET SETS 
Canadian dis. 35to37% percent. 
ROPE ETC. 

Sisal 12 

Pure Manilla 16 

"British " Manilla 13% 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 16 

" 5-32 inch 21 

" Vsinoh 22 

Russia Deep Sea 15 

Jute , 5 

Lath Yarn 10% 



RULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p,c. 

SADIRONS. per set. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished 65 

" No. 50, nickle-plated 75 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% pe oent. 
B 4 A. sand, 40 and 5 per cent. 
Emery, 40 percent. 
Garoet(Rurton's), 5 to 10 p.c. advance on list. 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. . . 9 50 

SAWS.- 
Hand Disston's,dis.l2% p.o. 
S. 4 D., 40 per oent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per ft 35 55 

S. 4 D., dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete, each 75 2 75 

1 rame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 2 25 2 50 

Solid, " l 75 2 00 

SASH CORD. 
Per lb 23 30 

SAW SETS. 

"Lincoln' and Wh ting, per doz... 4 75 

Hand Sets. No. 1 Woodyait(Morrill) 4 26 

X-cut sets , No. 3 Woodyatt (Morrill) 9 50 

SCALEb. 
Standard, 45 p.c. 
Champion, 55 p.c. 
Spring Balances, 10 p.o. 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 
Dominion, 55 p.c. 
" Richelieu, 55 p.c. 
Warren's new Standard 45 p.c. 
" Champion 65 p.c. 
SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent s per doz 65 100 

SCREWS 
Wood, F.H.,brightand steel, 87% and lOp.c 
Wo P. d £• H - '* di8 - 82 Vs and lu p.c. 

" F. H., brass dis. 80 and 10 p.c. 
Wood, R. H., •• dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
F.H., bronze, dis. 75 p.c. 
" 8.H. " 70 p.o. 

Drive Screws, 87% and 10 per oent. 

Bench, wood, perdoz 3 25 4 00 

" iron. " 4 25 5 75 

Set, Case hardened, 60 per cent 
Square Cap, 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, 45 per cent. 

SCYTHES. 

Per doz, net 9 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS. 
Bailey Cutlery Co., full nickeled, dia. 60 p.c 
Seymour's, dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 

Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 percent. 

8NAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 11 £0 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, 1% lb., per lb 37 

2 lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, perdoz 2 40 2 55 

" Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 60. 10 and 5 p.c. 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.c. 
STAMPED WARE. 
Plain, dis. ,75 and 12% p.c. off revised list 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revisedlist. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 50 4 00 

Plain •■••• 3 25 3 75 

Coopers , discourt 45 percent. 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per oent. 



36 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

CHAIN 



PITTSBURGH, 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF" 



U. S. A. 



OF ALL KINDS. 



Proof Coll, B.B., B.B.B., Crane. Dredge Chain. Trace Chains. Cow Ties. etc. 

ALEXANDER GIBB, «„„„;«„- !»«,«.«„ *««„«. A. C. LESLIE & CO., 
Mnntrml. -Canadian Representatives- Montreal 



Montreal. 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 



For other Provinces. 



STOCKS AND DIES. 

American die. 25 p.o. 

STONE. Per lb. 

Washita 28 60 

HindoBtan 06 07 

" slip 09 09 

Labrador 13 

" Axe 15 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas 00 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Qrind.2in,40 to 200 lb. per ton 25 00 

" under 40 11... " 28 00 

Grind, under 2 io. thick " 29 00 

STOVE PIPES. 
5 and 6 inch Per 100 lengths .... 7 00 
7 inch " " .... 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 

No. 4— 3 dozen in case.net cash 94 80 

No. 6— 3 dozen in case, " 8 40 

TACK.8 BRADS, ETC. 

Oheese-box tacks, blued 80 Sl 12% 

Trunk taoks, black and tinned 85 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 & 15 

T * " tinned 80&20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Oat tacks, blued, in dozens only ..80 

" Vt, weights 60 

Swedes out tacks, blued and tinned — 

In bulk 80*10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85, 12% & 12% 

" brush, blued k tinned, bulk. .70 
" gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 & 12% 

Zinc taoks 35 

Leather oarpet tacks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 52% 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 



Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout naila, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finish ing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

Lining tacks, in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin oapped trunk nails 25 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

bulk 40 

TAPE LINES. 
English, ass skin, per doz.... 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

" steel, each 80 8 00 

THERMOMETERS. 
Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.o. 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Same, Newhouse, dis. 25 p.c. 
Game, H. 4 N,, P. S. & W., 65 p.o. 
Same, steel, 72%, 75 p.o. 

TROWELS. 
Disston's discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 18% 

" 4-ply 23% 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, " 27 35 

VISES. 

Wright's 13% 

Brook's 12% 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

" " " No 2 5 50 

Saw Vise 4 50 9 00 



ENAMELLED WARE. 
White, Princess, Turquoise, Blueand White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 



WIRE. 

(M )OTH STCIL WIRI. 



No. 0-9 gauge. 
10 " . 



So. e 
12c. 
10c. 
30-. 
40c. 
55c. 
70.-. 



$2 60 



Add 60c. for coppering and $2 for tinning 
Eitraa net per 100 lb. —Oiled wire 10c, 
spring »ir< $1 .'. '.">. special hay baling wire 30c, 
best steel wire 75-., bright b ft drawn 15c, 
charcoal (extra quality) 41.25, pa'ked in 
casks or cases 15" , bagging and papering 
10c, 50 and 1001b. bundles 10c, in 55-lb. 
bundles 15c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in 
lib. hanks 50c, in %-lb. han*s 75c, in %-lb. 
hanks $1. 

Fine Steel Wire, dis. 22% per cent. 
List of extras : In 100-lb. lots : No. 
17, $5-No. 18, $5.50— No. 19, «6-No. 20, 
$6.65-No. 21, $7— No. 22, $7.30— No. 23, 
7.65-No. 24, 88-No. 25, $9-No. 26 
S9.50-No.27, 810-No. 28, $11 No. 29. 
$12-No. 30, $13-No. 31, $14— No. 32 $15, 
No. 33, $16— No. 34, $17. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31 
$4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 5c— oil, 
ing, 10c. — in 25-lb. bundles, 15c— in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
in %-lb. banks, 75c— in %-lb. hanks, $1— 
packed in casks orcases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c. 



Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per oent. off the 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and 10 per cent, net cash 30 

days, f.o.b. factory. 
Galvanized Wire, perlOOlb.— Nos. 6,7,8, $3.50 
to $3 85— No. 9, $2.85 to $3.15— No. 10 
$3.60 to $3.95— No. 11, $3.70 to $4.10-No 
12, $3 to $3.30— No. 13, $3.10 to $3.40— 
No. 14, $4.10 to $4.50— No. 15, 84.60 to 
$5.05— No. 16. $4.85 to $5 35. Base sizes, 
Nos. 6 to 9 $2.52% f.o b. Cleveland. 
Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand. No. 17, 
$4.65; No. 18, K2.90; No. 19. $2.60. Hol- 
low 6 strand, No. 17, $<-3n; No. 18. $2.70 
No. 19, $2.35; No 20, $2.30, f.o.b. Hamil 
ton, Toronto, Montreal. 

WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 3 00 

9alvanized, plain twist 3 00 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.77% 
in less than carlots, and $2.65 in carlots 
WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft. , net. . 1 25 
WASTE COTTON. per lb. 

Colored 6 

White 8 

WRENCHES. 
Acme, 35 to 37% per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe's Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.o. 

Towers' Engineer, each 2 00 7 00 

" S., per doz 5 80 6 00 

G. ft K.'s Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket, per doz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian.. " .... 24 00 

Royal American., " .... 24 00 

Sampson " .... 24 00 

Terms 4 months, or 3 p.c. 30 days. 
WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 
Canadian make, discount, 40 per cent. 



ADVERTISING inWESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG CANADA. 



THE PARCELL 



DROP LEVER 
TRUCK SCALES. 

Highly Endorsed by Government Inspectors. 




Designed for Farm, Mill, Factory and Warehouse uses. 
Ask your Wholesale Dealer for cuts and prices, or write 

AYLMER IRON WORKS CO,, Limited, AYLMER, 0NT, 



DIAMOND EXTENSION STOVE BACK 



They are easily 
adjusted and 
fitted to a stove 
by any one. 

Please your 
customers by 
supplying them 
immediately 
with what 
they want. 



PaUnUd, July Uth, 189S. 



Canadian Patent, Jnne Uth. 1894. 




Sold by 
Jobber* 
of . . . 

Hardware 
Tinware 

and 

Stoves. 



EXTENDED. 



Manufactured by THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
" A. R. WOODYATT & CO., Guelph, Ontario. 



PANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 






Montreal. 






Watch our ad. in next issue, or write to us for 
particulars on our patented 

Automatic Door Strip and Weather Strip 

Specially adapted for cold climates and takes 
the place of the inner window. 

HELMS 6c HELM S t i 4 8- 5 o wmow st.. 

PHILADELPHIA. 



THAT NEW SET 
OF BOOKS. 

You and your accountant will be 
proud of them if they are made of 
"oJrmese Linen Ledger" — par ex- 
cellence the paper for the best blank 
books. Writing surface fine — at the 
same time a good erasable face — 
and a most durable paper. 

CANADA PAPER CO ., Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL 



'*fjl/ll.0 'fO-DAV <HfrJ, 
li/lfM A f I6f/*J ANP 

— • Xorv<i£e€"£<ru>'. 

DO YOl/? 

4» in the * 

To^oi4-ro 

u/tf/ bring you, 

tenders/rem. ifr* 
&esf contactors 




.^V-'. 



BRITISH BUSINESS CHANCES. 

Firms desirous of getting into communication 
with British manufacturers or merchants, or who 
wish to buy British goods on the best possible 
terms, or who are willing to become agents for 
British manufacturers, are invited to send partic- 
ulars of their requirements for 

FREE INSERTION 
in " Commercial Intelligence," to the Editor 

•SELL'S COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE,' 

168 Fleet Street, London, England. 

"Commercial Intelligence" circulates all over 
the United Kingdom amongst the best firms. Firms 
communicating should give reference as to bona 
fides. 

N.B. — A free specimen copy will be sent on re- 
ceipt of a post card. 



Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Glotbes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by all Wholesale Dealers 



"BAILEY" BRAND CUTLERY 



SURPASSES ALL OTHER MAKES 



WRITE FOR 
CATALOGUE. 




FULLY WARRANTED. 
Shears, Scissors, Razors, and Butcher Knives, made by 

BAILEY CUTLEEY CO., 

BRANTFORD, ONT. 



Limited 



CHAS. F. CLARK, President. 



JARED CHITTENDEN Treasurer. 



.ESTABLISHED 1849- 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices : Nob. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized 
world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 

—OFFICES IN CANADA 

LONDON, ONT. MONTREAL, QUE. 

ST. JOHN. N.B. TORONTO, ONT. 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 

THOS. C. IRVING, Gen, Man, Western Canada, Toronto. JOHN A. FULTON, Gen, Man, Eastern Canada, Montreal. 



HALIFAX, N.S. 
OTTAWA. ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 



BwlB 


i . 


■ ' !II!l!l!l l ji!!lll!|llll|li , >ii;: , !l" 1, l""l l 




\M * T 




Established Cable Address, 

1832. "Bliss." 

manufactcbeks 

Wood Turnings, Hand 

Bench and other Screws 

Mallets, Handles, Vises 

Clamps, Tool Chests 

Croquet, Lithographs 

Wood Toys, Novelties 

and also the celebrated 

Wood's P a " nt Ca ' 

Gate 

For Street and Steam Rail- 
road Cars, 

The R. BLISS MFG. CO. 

Pawtuoket, R.I., U.S.A. 


\ 1 '1 




■'T~ 


M 


I 


inn 







Canadian Representative: ALEXANDER GIBB, 13 St. John St., MONTREAL. 
75 YEARS. ESTABLISHED 1825. 75 YEARS. 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. ^^\T%l:Z ™ mmY *"* x - 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 




i Black Diamond File Works 

6. & H. Barnett Company 



Inc. 1S96 



PHILADELPHIA 



Twelve 



Medals 




Awarded 

By JURORS at 

International Expositions 

Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 



•»*% 




^^%r»»^%r%r%%^%/*%/V%/%/%/%r%/%%/%/%>^ 



$ 



1902 




HOSE. '902 



We manufacture the most popular and best 
selling lines of Garden Hose in Canada. Our ,l ' lal- 
tese Cross" brand we confidently recommend as 
the finest Garden Hose on the market. 

We have other grades not quite so expensive, 
but good reliable brands, viz. : "Lion" (the popular 
medium-priced hose), "King" ••Sun" and "Leader." 

Our "Kinkproof" (wire wound) hose is wired 
by a special process controlled solely by ourselves, 
and is so constructed that it may be cut at any 
wind of the wire without loosening or uncoiling, 
the wire being self-gripping throughout each 
length. 



The Outta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Cd. 



OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms- 
45-47-49 West Front St. 



Factories 



I 15-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



TORONTO, 



CANADA. 



Notice of 

Removal 

After the first day of February, 1902, 
our address will be 

No. 53 St. Sulpice St. 
Montreal. 

B.& S.H.THOMPSON & CO. 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 


Lathyarn 


Sisal Rope 


Shingleyarn 


Jute Rope 


Bale Rope 


Russian Rope 


Lariat Rope 


Marline 


Hemp Packing 


Houseline 


Italian Packing 


Hambroline 


Jute Packing 


Clotheslines 


Drilling Cables 


Tarred Hemp Rope 


Spunyarn 


White Hemp Rope 


Pulp Cord 


Bolt Rope 


Lobster Marlin 


Hide Rope 


Paper Cord 


Halyards 


Cheese Cord 


Deep Sealine 


Hay Rope 


Ratline 


Fish Cord 


Plow Lines 


Sand Lines 


"RED THREAD" Transmission Rope 


from the finest quality Mani.a 


hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 




CONSUMERS CORDAC 


IE COMPANY, 


Western Ontario Representative— 




WM. B. STEWART, 
Tel 94. 27 Front St. West, TORONTO. 


MONTREAL, QUE. 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware, Metal, Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, FEBRUARY I, 1902 



NO. 5. 




S CUTLERYs 



FOR SALE BY LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES. 



Lysaght's Brands 



"Queen's Head"— Best quality, best galvanizing. 
"FleUP de Lis" — Best quality, ordinary galvanizing. 
"Redeliffe" — Corrugating quality. 
"OPb" — Highest grade Corrugated Iron. 



Each the leader in its grade. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTEEAL, 
BRISTOL, ENG. Managers Canadian Branch. 



Why It Succeeded ! 









_.* 




iff- 


s 

V 


^■iip 




■ _- .- -*A -v_ 



Without any strenuous aid from us, the "Saftord" has worked 
itself into the highest attainable place on the world's market to-day. 

Because it is the simplest and most compact radiator in 
existence. 

Because its joints are made with a screwed connection — no 
bolts, or packing. 

Because the contractor finds it the easiest to handle. 

Because the public find it the most satisfactory of all radiators 
to use — can't leak ; once installed all bother is over. 

If you have not our catalogue write for it. 



THE DOMINION RADIATOR CO., LIMITED 

liead Office, Dufferin Street, Toronto, Canada. 



4*4**1*4* pINE *^^^ 



English Cutlery 



CARVERS IN CASES 
DESSERT SETS 
FISH EATERS 
CAKE KNIVES 
BREAD FORKS, Etc. 



milium 



* # 






» m i»» m » n »» 



BRASS KETTLES 
CHAFING DISHES 
HOT- WATER PLATES 
BRASS INK STANDS 
PAPERWEIGHTS, Etc. 

iiitt IIIIKIDIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHI Illlllll ] 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



Cor. King and Victoria Streets. 



INI 



£3flrt!iW?fli1t!WWrfliWWW1trWR?!TO 






COPPER 

Bar, Ingot, Sheet, Tubing. 



Samuel, Sons & Benjamin, London and Liverpool, Eng. 



3 
3 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



£ 
£ 
£ 



M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants. 



3 

^ 27 Wellington St. West, ^TORONTO, ONT. | 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




<£ Australasian ^ 
Hardware and Machinery, 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
and Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 

post free to any part of the world. 



PUBLISHING OFFICES: 

Melbourne 
Sydney, 

AMERICAN OFFICES: 

New York, 

BRITISH OFFICES: 

London, - 



Fink's Buildings. 

Post Office Chambers. 

Park Row/ Building. 



- 4a Cannon St., E.C. 
Specimen Copies on application. 



CR.Co. Star 




RED RUBBER PACKING 

FOR HIGH-GRADE WORK 



Good Packing Good Price 



Good Profits 



Good Advertising Matter 



Send for samples, prices and advertising matter. 



The Canadian Rubber Co. 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 



— 







"YANKEE" 
RATCHET SCREW DRIVER 
N2I5 




Our "YANKEE" Tool Book 
<tells all about them. Mailed 
free on application 



No. 15. " Yankee Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 




No. 30 " Yankee " Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand.C M 




No. 41. "Yankee" Automatic Drill,'' Eight Drill Points in Handle. 




Manufacturers also of 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chlppers. 
Fluting Machines, 

Hand Fluters. 



No. SO. "Yankee " Reciprocating Drill, for Iron, Steel. Brass, Wood, etc. 



Sold by Leading jobbers 
in Canada. 




NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 



No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 

Screw Driver, 



Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WINDOW GLASS 



-TO IMPORT. 
1 ■iivftrr 

Prompt Deliveries. 



EVERY KINO OF PLATE AND WINDOW GLASS IN STOCK. 

BENT GLASS °' r a " kinds, our own manufacture. Closest Prices, 



TORONTO PLATE GLASS IMPORTING CO., 

Mill & Rutherford 



Warcrooms and Offices— 135 to 143 Victoria St. 
Bending Works- 209 to 213 Victoria St. 



TORONTO 



FOR THE 
STREET 




What 



M THBBE , , 

THE M^M L,GMT 



Lamps 
Do. 



They give a stronger, whiter, steadier light than the electric 
arc. Operate easily, safely, satisfactorily. Save money— actual 600 
candle-power light at a cost of one-half cent an hour. Think of 
it ! Write for circulars, etc. GOOD AGENTS WANTED- Exclu- 
sive territory allowed. 

ACORN BRASS WORKS, 
Dept. 8, 15-23 Jefferson Street CHICAGO, ILL. 



What 

M&M" 




FOR THE 
STORE 



Lamps 
Save. 



Barrett Hardware Co , Joliet, 111 , write : "Gasoline and sup- 
plies for six "M & M" Lamps cost us $45.46 last year, an average of 
60c. a month per lamp. We believe we had as good a light as 
though we had six electric arc lights at a cost of $365." No wonder 
that over 30,000 "M&M" Lamps are in use all over the United 
States and Canada. THEY KILL BIO GAS AND ELECTRIC 
LIGHT BILLS. It will pay you to investigate. Write for circu- 
lars. AGENTS WANTED. Dept. 8, 15-23 Jefferson St., Chicago. 




DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 



ST. MARYS, 0NT., CANADA. 



"Maxwell Favorite Churn" Lawn Mowers. 



PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever 
Drive, and Detachable Driving Link. Improv- 
ed for season of igoa. Steel or Wood Frame 
as desired. 



High and Low Wheels, 
from n-in. to ao-in. 
widths. Cold Rolled 

Steel Shafting, Crucible Steel Knives and 

Cutting Plate. 



Wheelbarrows. 



In Four different Sizes. 



Steel Frame 



If your Wholesale House does not offer you these 
articles 

SEND DIRECT TO US. 

"THE MAXWELL" 

Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches. 



MAXWELL MOWER 

8-inch Low Wheel. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO 



ONLY 

WHOLESALE 



37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. 

CROSS CUT SAWS 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 




»V,, •>**&1 , !'! , ifc< 



" Triumph "—Henry Disston's Champion Tooth, Narrow Blade. 






II 



■iiniiiniiiiiiuiniiHiii 



^—wwj 




EXTRA ; ' ISBpl |i|| j . I||| ,|:|,| i | 1 i IIIIIW*- 

1 1'i'ill^t^^l^^'j-^ illl'SoJvj'IIMliTlliiHlli improved' 1 cnoss-curssw-'I'iH'P 11 ■ 

srmNGSTEcJa/WAR,RAirrto ~? ^"T«A high temper cr~- 

|!| tKTHATHlMM CK i , , , REFINED ' CRUCIBLE 5TE(L 

1 ,', PATENT GROUND ' ' «0B ,6»UMS Tt.lh«ll ON BACK.,' ^t r( en lHtC !S^- r ^ 

Henry Disston's "Toledo Blade." 

HANDLED CHOPPING AXES. 




asi . 



AXE WEDGES. 



ill 



AXE STONES. 






2*X \)iX% 



CHOPPING AXES. 



The 

Uncle Sam 
Axe 




DURDAS AXE WORKS. 
Full Line. 



RIXFORD MFG. CO. 
Full Line. 



WELLAND VALE MFG. CO. 
Full Line. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto. 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY 



Graham Wire and Cut Nails are the Best. 

Faotory : Dufferln Street, Toronto. 



OUR PRICES 

ARE RIGHT 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 

Manufacturers of the celebrated 




HRS&C 

CANADA 



AND 



TIN PLATES 

Canadian Office : 
6 ST. SACRAMENT ST., MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 



WRIGHT'S 

Insect 
Sprayers 

PLAIN TIN, 
LACQUERED, 
ALL BRASS. 

••BEST ON EARTH." 

Manufactured by 



E. T.WRIGHT SCO. 

HAMILTON, ONT , and 
MONTREAL, QUE. 
J. H. Hanson, Agent, Montreal. 



KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32, Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 





Samples sent free on application. 

HORSE NAILS-" C," Brand Horse - Nails 

Canada Horse Nail Co. 
" BRASSITE " GOODS — Gnnn Castor Co. 

Limited. Birmingham, Knsr. 






THE PROPRIETOR'S STORY. 




ALABASTINE we have been selling nigh on to twenty years, and know it to be reliable. 

We dealers also know that Alabastine is what is in demand, and that to sell anything else for coating 
walls, we would have to do so on the recommendation that it was the same thing, or just as good as 
ALABASTINE. Would not offer a substitute when Alabastine is called for ; no necessity to do that, 
as it is easier to sell Alabastine, and in handling it we do not incur any risk on account of infringement of 
patents. 

Alabastine is ready for use by the additioji of Cold Water, made so by the inventor, Mr. M. B. 
Church, who was the first to produce a cold water preparation that is thoroughly practical, that has 
superseded all hot water mixtures, and forced other manufacturers to UNDERTAKE the use of the 
cold water process. Then, again, Alabastine is made in Canada, by Canadian labor and from Canadian 
materials. It satisfies my customers. 

The trade supplied by Wholesale Hardware and Paint Dealers. Also by 

THE ALABASTINE CO., LIMITED, PARIS, ONT. 

THE INDEPENDENT CORDAGE CO , Limited, 

TORONTO. 

Highest Award Pan-American Exposition 

MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 

L«, L l. ROPE. Lath Yarn > Shin 8 |e Yarn > Hide Cord . BINDER TWINE 

MANILA ^^^^^^ . ^»^^^^^^^™^^^^^^« 

Pulp Cord. Clothes Lines. ^^^^^^^^^^ 

Transmission Rope a specialty. 



SAW-SET 



ASK YOUR HARDWARE MERCHANT FOR IT , 

TAKE NO OTHER. FAILING TO DO ITS g 
,fi= WORK YOUR MONEY WILLBE RETURNED z 
£ R.DILLON, OSffAWAoNT. r< 



What is a poor 
Scythe good for ? 

You make friends 
and money by sell- 
ing DILLON'S. 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON-EJECTING. 

12 and 16 Gauges. 
Steel and Twist Barrels. 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 




HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 

Also makers of H. & R. Revolvers, 

Catalog on request. Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




LEWIS BRO'S & CO, 



Wholesale Hardware, 

MONTREAL 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE PATENT 

FRONT DRAW-OUT GRATE 



OF OUR 



MPEREAL OXFOR 



is one of the special features that 
give it precedence over all other Ranges. 

This arrangement is of special advantage, as nothing — 
not even the warping of the frame — can interfere with its easy 
working. The 

DIFFUSIVE FLUE CONSTRUCTION 
DRAW-OUT OVEN RACK 
OVEN THERMOMETER 

are other improvements that have made the Imperial 
Oxford the popular range of Canada. 

They're wonderful sellers and we remind you that 
early orders receive prompt attention. 

THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO,, Limited 



i 

TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER 

THE QURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL 




ESTABLISHED 1750 




TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS \ 
ROPERIE ' 



"UFACTU 
OF 



LEITH 



SCOTLAND 



*ERs 






1 

STEAMER 
CLOTH 



IgF AND * „ 
CW CLOTH 4 ■ 
WCOMPANYff 
% LEITH 4? J 



Cordage 



MANILA ROPE 

SISAL ROPE 

NEW ZEALAND ROPE 

RUSSIAN ROPE 

JUTE ROPE 

FISHING LINES 

NETTING TWINES 

PARCEL TWINES 

SPUNYARNS& PACKINCS 

BAILING ROPES & CORDS 




& Canvas 




1750 



SAILCLOTH 

STEAMER CLOTHS 

AWNINCS 

TENT CLOTHS 

DUCK S 

PRESSING CLOTHS 

TARPAU LINGS 

CHEMICAL WATERPROOF 

SEAMING TWINES 

ROPING TWINES 



BUYERS OWN SAMPLES MATCHED AT LOWEST TRADE TERMS 



iSK.SOTl] 



I 1 

eoinburch 
Waterproof, 



<f AND A , 

<* SAIL CLOTH^ 

% LEITH # 
* /I50 




ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO OUR CANADIAN OFFICE AND STORES, 

THE EDINBURGH ROPERIE & SAILCLOTH COY, Limited, 9 St. Peter Street, MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE OSHAWA WIRE 
1 FENCE CO., LIMITED 



OSHAWA, ONT. 



Manufacturers of Woven Wire Fencing, 
Gates, Etc. 

Also Dealers in Galvanized Fence Wire, 

Agents Wanted. 
Send for Catalogue and Prices. 

There are twelve 
Axes that sell well 
in every dozen of 

DUNDAS 
AXES 

Wait for travel- 
lers with samples 
before placing your 
orders. 

Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont. 

W. L. Haldiraand, Jr., Montreal, Agent. 




tern 



1 CrpUllm SuiUry Will PliKk. 



gaaaaf 



THE MURALO COnPANV, 



MURALO 



THE COLD WATER 
WALL FINISH 



VVVVVVVVVVVWVVVVVW^VVVVVVVWXAVVVVIVVVVWVWV 

Get a stock of MURALO and have a Wall Finish 
that has quietly stepped into first place in the ranks 
of COLD WATER goods. It holds first place 
for merit alone. Better milled, better toned, 
healthier, and easier to apply. MURALO is the 
best advertised Wall Finish in the World. 

■WVVWWWVWWWVWW 'WWX'W'WWWV wwwww\ 

Agents : 
A. RAMSAY £» SON, - - MONTREAL 

J. M.ASriDOWN, - - WINNIPEG 

Mclennan, Mceeely &> co., - Vancouver 



IMPROVED STEEL WIRE TRACE CHAINS. 

Every chain guaranteed. Most profitable and satisfactory chain to handle. 




Improved Quality for 1902. 

THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., limited 

HAMILTON, ONT., AND MONTREAL, QUE. 



LOCKS and BUILDERS' 



Catalogues and price list mailed on 
application. 

THE LARGEST MAKERS 
IN THE DOMINION. 



Made in great variety of 
design and finish. 




The Gurney-Tilden Co., Limited, - Hamilton, Canada, 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




Supplies for the Maple Syrup Season 



Sap Buckets. 



Extra deep and straight. Three sizes. They possess many advantages over the ordinary flar- 
ing Buckets; being small in diameter they do not catch the rain or snow, and, as they are very 
deep, they hang perpendicularly and consequently will not overflow until full. Covers sup- 
plied if required. They nest close for shipping or storing. 

We can also supply the ordinary Flaring or Western Sap Pails. 




E. T. Sap Spouts. 



Made of Retinned Steel. Strong and durable. Only require a ^-in. hole in tree. It does 
not cover the inside surface of the hole, therefore a larger amount of sap is obtained. 
Packed in cardboard boxes. 

Maple Leaf Sap Spouts. 

Made in Bronzed Steel. Require a K-in. hole. Has a shoulder which prevents it being 
driven in too far. The hole in the tree is not exposed to wind and snow, consequently sap will 
flow longer. Packed in cardboard boxes. 




J^yrUp CatlS. Round or Square. 



Plain or Decorated. Made in #, % and l-gallon sizes — either Wine or Imperial measure. 




A FULL STOCK CARRIED IN ALL LINES. ORDERS SHIPPED PROHPTLY. 



KEMP MANUFACTURING COY, 



Toronto, Canada. 




VOL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. FEBRUARY I, 1902. 



NO. 5. 



President : 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. 

">e MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P. E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 



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Toronto 
London, Eng. 
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Winnipeg 



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NEW YORK - Room 442 New York Life Bldg. 
Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s. 
Published every Saturday. 

„ , . ... [Adscript, London. 

Cable Address | Adscr £ t Canada. 



• WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT 1NTHISPAPER 



THE CHIEF CAUSE OF FAILURES. 

NOTHING is more necessary when 
beginning business than capital. It 
is the very foundation of business. 
And its lack is the cause of more commer- 
cial failures than all other causes together. 
In Canada and Newfoundland, last year, 
there were 1,379 failures. And, according 
to Bradstreet's commercial agency, 974 of 
these were due to lack of capital alone. In 
other words, it was the cause of over 70 per 
cent, of the total failures. And this is 
about the average of several years past. 
This is a much larger proportion than in the 



United States, where the percentage last 
year was only a little over 30. 

These figures are certainly startling. An 
ambition to go into business on his own 
account is commendable in any young man. 
But it is well that ambition of this kind 
should on all occasions be tempered with 
common sense. 

Capital as a necessity in business is 
gradually becoming more and more impor- 
tant. The amount that even 10 years ago 
would have been considered substantial 
capital would to-day be deemed insufficient 
to warrant one launching into business for 
himself. 

With the keenness of competition and 
the smallness of pre fits that are such mark- 
ed features of business conditions to day, it 
is only commercial enterprises that are 
strongly fortified with capital that can hope 
to succeed. It is this more than anything 
else that induces seperate business enter- 
prises to amalgamate, and that brings into 
existence the large department stores. 

It is better that one should forever be an 
employe than that, becoming an employer 
with inadequate capital, failure should 
follow and the savings of years of hard 
work lost. 



FIRM LINSEED OIL MARKET. 

Linseed oil appears to be in a rather 
favorable position just now. At this time of 
year there are usually exports of seed 
from the United States to Great Britain and 
Europe; but instead of exporting the United 
States is at present importing, being a 
purchaser of Argentine seed. Flaxseed is 
showing increased firmness in Chicago, and 
quotations of oil in London, Eng., are at 
the moment above the parity of prices in 
Toronto for 10-barrel lots, 



SENTIMENT IN BUSINESS. 

SENTIMENT does not count for much 
in trade, either in individuals or in 
nations. Price, commensurate with 
quality, is the ruling influence. Sentiment 
may incline buyers in the direction of cer- 
tain sellers, but it is easily switched in 
another direction if more favorable econo- 
mic conditions prevail elsewhere. 

Canadians would rather import from 
Great Britain than from any other country, 
and the British people, we have reason to 
believe, would rather buy Canadian than 
goods that are the product of countries out- 
side the British Empire. But all things, 
particularly in regard to cost and quality, 
must be equal. Business is business the 
world over. 

It is obvious, therefore, that the chief aim 
should be to manufacture an article whose 
quality is good and whose price will not be 
above that of those who are his competitors 
in the same market. 

We do not wish to ignore sentiment in 
business. On the contrary, we would urge 
its cultivation, for it has its use. And that 
is to throw the balance in the desired direc- 
tion when competitors are equal as to quality 
and price. But it is childish and unbusi- 
nesslike to expect that sentiment shall be 
the determining factor in mercantile life 
under all conditions. If it were possible to 
make it so, what would be the result ? 
Simply that those who relied upon it would 
become effete and un progressive, and would 
ultimately cease to exist. 

The commerce of the world has not been 
developed on sentiment. Competition and 
enterprise have been the most potent forces. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE C.P.R.'S NEW STOCK ISSUE. 

THE announcement that the Canadian may be to such an extent that such tolls 
Pacific Railway Co. has been granted when reduced shall not produce less than 
permission by the Government to 10 per cent, per annum on the capital 
issue new stock to the extent of 820,000.000 actually expended in the construction of 
has naturally excited a great deal of interest the railway." In other words, until the 
in financial and commercial circles. capital expended in the construction of the 
It is stipulated by the conditions under road earns more than 10 per cent, the 
which the power has been granted by the Government cannot have a voice in de- 
Government that the stock must not be sold termining the freight rates. What this 



below par. The money obtained from the 
disposal of the stock is to be applied in the 
following manner : New rolling stock and 
locomotives, $9,000,000; double tracking 
west of Lake Superior, $6,000,000 ; new 
plants for construction of rolling stock, 
chiefly at Montreal, $1,500,000 ; new 
elevators, improvement of terminals, etc., 
$3,000,000 ; miscellaneous improvements, 
$500,000. 

This is an age when people are more dis- 



clause really means has never been authori- 
tatively defined, legal opinion being divided 
in regard thereto, although to the lay mind 
it would seem to clearly indicate that the 
purpose of the Act was to give the Govern- 
ment control of the rates as soon as the 
earnings were in excess of 10 per cent, of 
the capital actually expended in the first 
cost of the road. However, it is in regard 
to this clause that the concessions made by 
the railway in the present instance are con- 



posed than ever before to criticize closely cerned. 

new powers or privileges which may be In the first place, the C.P.R. agrees that 

granted to railway corporations. This is, the $20,000,000 obtained from the issue of 

of course, due to the fact that the looseness new stock and expended on construction 

in this respect in the past on the part of work shall not be reckoned as a part of the 

both the people and their representatives in cost of the railway. It is further agreed to 



Parliament allowed the railway corpora- 
tions to so fortify themselves behind agree- 
ments and legislative enactments as to 
make them and not the Government 
masters of the situation. To day it is 
an unwritten law that no further privi- 



submit the regulating clause in the Act of 
1 88 1 to the Supreme Court of Canada or 
to the Judicial Committee of the Privy 
Council, if necessary, for interpretation. 

If the court of final appeal should give 
the clause the wide interpretation, namely, 



leges or powers shall be granted the big that the cost of construction means the 



railway corporations, and particularly the 
C.P.R. , unless the applicant for the powers 
agrees to make some concessions on privi- 
leges obtained under previous agreements. 
This, it will be remembered, was one of the 
features of the agreement with the C. P. R. 
when it was given the authority to construct 
its Crow's Nest Pass branch, a certain 
reduction in the freight rates being the 
concession obtained. 

Under the agreement just made between 
the C.P.R. and the Goverument, whereby 
the former is permitted to issue the $20,- 
000,000 of stock, certain concessions have 
also been obtained from the railway com- 
pany. What their value is it is scarcely 
possible at the present to determine. 

In the Act of 1881 incorporating the 
C.P.R. it was stipulated in the clause regu- 



amount spent on the road, not only in the 
first instance, but for all time, then the 
agreement of the C.P.R. not to count as a 
part of the cost of the construction the 
$20,000,000 which it now proposes to 
expend is perhaps of some value, although 
but slight, for, if the Act is so interpreted, it 
will practically mean that the dividend-earn- 
ing power of the company will always be 
kept below the point where Government 
interference in the rates would be possible. 
Should the courts, on the other hand, inter- 
pret the clause as meaning the cost in the 
original construction of the road, then it 
would obviously be of no importance 
whether the railway company agreed or not 
to include the $20,000,000 out of the 
reckoning. 

However, there is one thing that should 



that the development of the West has 
necessitated the C.P.C. expending such a 
large amount of money in putting its rolling 
stock and track in a position to cope with it. 



A BUSINESS MAN FOR GOVERNOR. 

IT is announced by the daily papers that 
Senator Snowball is to be appointed 
Lieutenant-Governor of New Bruns- 
wick. 

The gubernatorial office is not one in 
which the occupant is supposed to exercise 
much influence in the business of the State. 
We believe, however, that a Provincial 
Governor can, if he has the ability, do a 
great deal in directing the minds and 
actions of the members of his Cabinet along 
the same practical business lines as a 
business man would the heads of his various 
departments. 

Mr. Snowball has had several years' 
experience in both the House of Commons 
and the Senate, but, what is more important 
still, he has had many years of practical 
experience as a business man. 

In Chatham, N.B., his large sawmill is 
the most important of its kind on the 
Miramichi river, turning out, as it does, 
large quantities of lumber annually for the 
British and Continental markets. Besides 
this, there are other industries in that part 
of the country which have his advice and 
financial assistance. 

At the annual meeting of the Maritime 
Board of Trade, held in Chatham in August 
last, he was most assiduous in his attention 
to the business of the convention, and 
assisted materially in making it the success 
it was, from both a business and a social 
standpoint. 

The business men of New Brunswick are 
to be congratulated in having as their next 
Lieutenant-Governor a practical and a suc- 
cessful business man. 



lating the freight rates that " such reduction be a source of satisfaction to all, and that is 



A DECLINE IN COPPER RIVETS. 

A change has been made in the price of 
copper rivets and burrs, and also in the 
manner of quoting the same. 

When copper rivets with the usual* pro- 
portion of burrs are wanted the discount is 
45 to 10 per cent., instead of 35 and 5 per 
cent. This is a reduction of 20 per cent. 
If copper burrs only are wanted the dis- 
count is 30 and 10 per cent., which makes 
the price slightly higher than before. 

Competition is the chief cause of the 
decline, although the weakness in the copper 
market is doubtless a factor as well. 



CANADfAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



THE LATE H. S. HOWLAND. 



BY the death of the late H. S. Howland 
Toronto loses a venerable and 
greatly respected citizen. He was 
not a presumptuous man. He was the 
very contrary. Quiet and unassuming, he 
went about his business without any blare 
of trumpets. But he was a man of more 
than usual ability in the commercial sense, 
and, by force of this, he won a place in the 
commercial and financial world such as is 
attained by few. Besides being head of 
the wholesale hardware firm of H. S. 
Howland, Sons & Co., Toronto, and of his 
extensive flour milling properties at Klein- 
burg, Ont., be was president of the Imperial 
Bank, and, in spite of the 78 years that 
rested upon him, was, up to within three or 
four days of his death, apparently hale and 
hearty. It was while returning from a visit 
to the mills at Kleinburg that he was 
stricken with paralysis. This was on 
Saturday, January 25, his death taking 
place the following Tuesday night. 

Deceased came to Canada about 62 years 
ago from Paulings, N.Y., and at Lambton 
Mills engaged in the milling industry with 
his brother, the present Sir W. P. Howland, 
From that time until within a few days of 
his death he was an active participant in 
the commercial life of Ontario. He was, 
during his life, the president of three 
railways, namely, the Toronto and Nipis- 
sing, the Toronto, Grey and Bruce, and the 
Toronto and Ottawa. 

In bank organization he also played an 
important part, being one of the moving 
spirits in the creation of both the Bank of 
Commerce and the Imperial Bank, the 
former of which he was vice-president at its 
inception, and the latter of which he was 
president at the time of his death. 

Never a man who courted public life, he, 
however, at one time took some share in 
municipal politics and served a term as 
warden of York County. 

He was a type of a business man who 
said little and did much. 

In manner, he was quiet, even tempered 
and genial. To converse with him was a 
privilege, for he was liberal in his views, 
was well informed on public affairs and 
current topics, and was full of interesting 



reminiscences of the commercial life of 
Canada during the 60 years in which he was 
such an active participant. 

He is gone, and his going reminds us of 
the two last verses of one of the great 
Samuel Johnson's poems : 

The busy day — the peaceful night, 

Unfelt, uncounted, glided by ; 
His frame was firm — his powers were bright, 

Though now his eightieth year was nigh. 

Then with no fiery throbbing pain, 

No cold gradations of decay, 
Death broke at once the vital chain, 

And freed his soul the nearest way. 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COM- 
PROMISES. 

A DEMAND of assignment has been 
made on Joseph Cousineau, 
coal and wood merchant, Mont- 
real, Que. 

Pouilot & Gervais, painters, Quebec, 
have compromised at 50c. on the dollar. 

A consent of assignment of Gregoire 
Leveille, plasterer, Montreal, has been 
filed. 

S. 0. Donoghue, builder, Antigonish, 
N.S., is offering to compromise at 50c. 
on the dollar. 

The creditors of Joseph Laporte, wood 
and coal merchant, Montreal, held a 
meeting on January 30. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND 
DISSOLVED. 
Laird & Ford, builders, Deloraine, 
Man., have dissolved. 

C. D. Alluisi & Cie, plaster ornaments, 
Montreal, have dissolved. 

The Montreal Size Co., glue manufac- 
turers. Cote St. Paul, Que., have dis- 
solved. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

The assets of A. O'Borne, wood and 
coal merchant, Montreal, have been sold. 

O'Borne Bros., lumber and implement 
merchants, Ponoka, N.W.T., have sold 
out. 

The assets of J. A. Duval, hardware 
merchant, Montreal, are to be sold on 
February 3. 

The assets of The Diamond Lighting 
Co., Montreal, are advertised for sale 
by tender. 

The assets of The Brampton Gas Co., 
Limited, Brampton, Ont., are advertised 
to be sold by tender. 

CHANGES. 

The Canadian Automachine Co. has 
registered at Montreal. 

Rousse & Rousse, wood and coal mer- 
chants, Montreal, have registered. 

The Columbus Building Association, 
Quebec, has applied for a charter. 



The St. Anne Co., lumber merchants, 
Quebec, have applied for a charter. 

•James Card, blacksmith, Albcrton, 
P.E.I., is succeeded by Arthur Hardy. 

John Galey & Co.. sawmill owners, Si. 
John, N.B., are going out of business. 
Catherine Eraser has registered at Mont 
real for Win. F. Copland & Co., carpen 
ters. 

■ lames Curran has registered for Moore 
& Co., wood and coal merchants, Mont- 
real. 

1). Holmes & Co., stoves, etc., Yar- 
mouth, N.S., have sold out to A. J. Lin- 
coln. 

W. A. MacKay, electrical supplies, 
Halifax, N.S., has removed to North 
Sydney. 

The Broadbent Wood Turning Co., 
Limited, Broadbent, Ont., has obtained 
a charter. 

Ashdowns', hardware- merchants, York- 
town, N.W.T., have been succeeded by S. 
G. McKee & Co. 

James McCann, agricultural implement 
merchant, Killarney, Man., has sold out 
to Robert Lawson. 

Mrs. T. Dansereau has registered for 
T. Dansereau & Cie, wood and coal mer- 
chants, Montreal. 

Charles F. Moore has registered for T. 
F. Moore & Co., wood and coal mer- 
chants, Montreal. 

Tin' Heaslip-Lawton Co., Limited, 
agricultural implements, Alameda, N. W. 
T.. is applying for incorporation. 

The Montreal Lumber Co., Limited, is 
applying for supplementary letters to in- 
crease its capital to S100.000. 

The Bennett-Foster Co., contractors, 
River Desert, Que., have obtained a 
charter. 

Arthur Doig, hardware and implement 
merchant, Birtle, Man., has sold out to 
Taylor & Mitchell, who take possession 
March 1. 

FIRES. 
E. A. Pearson, tinware merchant, Rat 
Portage. Ont., was burned out. 

Peter Loubret, painter, Quebec, has 

been burned out. His stock was insured. 

T. Laframbroise, carriagemaker, St. 

Phillipe D'Argenteuil, Que., has been 

burned out. 

The building at Sydney, N.S., belong- 
ing to Rhodes, Curry & Co., Limited-, 
contractors, Amherst, N.S., has been 
burned. It was insured. 

W. S. Duggan, general merchant, Oil 
Springs, Ont., has suffered loss by fire. 
His property was insured. 
DEATHS. 
Alfred Mills, lumber and coal merchant, 
is dead. 

John Taylor, coal merchant, Dunnville, 
Ont., is dead. 

Henry S. Howland, of The Graham 
Nail Works, and H. S. Howland, Sons & 
Co.. wholesale hardware merchants, To- 
ronto, is dead. 



L 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ANNUAL MEETINGS OF BOARDS OF TRADE. 



THE BERLIN BOARD. 

OUITE a number of prominent mem- 
bers were present at the annual 
meeting of the Berlin, Ont., Board 
of Trade on January 23, when the presi- 
dent's report was presented and the officers 
elected for the year 1902. 

The retiring president, S. J. Williams, in 
his address, mentioned the securing of the 
factory for the town of Berlin, the progress 
that had been made in the problems of 
technical education, the lighting plant, 
additional railway facilities and the matter 
of the Shurley & Dietrich industry. 

He also noted the increase of 59 in the 
membership during the year, the total num- 
ber now enrolled being 224. The board 
had held 15 regular and 10 special meetings 
during the year. He concluded by urging 
the new members to take a live interest 
in the work. 

A vote of thanks was heartily given to 
the retiring president, Mr. Williams, for his 
services during the past two years. Mr. 
Williams would not stand for reelection. 

The following are the officers for the year 
1902 : 

President— Robert Smyth. 

Vice-President— J. P. Bell, 

Secreary— H. J. Sims. 

Treasurer —Edward Smyth. 

Council— S. J. Williams, H. L. Janzen, C. K. 
Hagedorn, J. U. Clemens, D. B. Detwiler, C. A. 
Ahrens (jr.), G. Shirk and C. H. Mills. 

THE TORONTO BOARD. 

The annual meeting of the Toronto Board 
of Trade was held on Monday afternoon. 
The president, vice-presidents and treasurer 
having been elected by acclamation a week 
before, interest in the meeting was naturally 
not as keen as it might otherwise have been. 
The officers for the ensuing year are as 
follows : 

President— Mr. A. E. Ames. 

First Vice-President— Mr. J. F. Ellis. 

Second Vice-President— Mr. J. D. Allan. 

Treasurer— Mr. E. R. Wood. 

Members of the Council— Hugh N. Baird, T. G. 
Brough, R. J. Christie, W. F. Cockshutt (Brant- 
ford), W. J. Gage, Edward Gurney, Peleg How- 
land, A. E. Kemp (M.P.), C.G.Marlatt (Oakville), 
Noel Marshall, P. R. Miller, J. L.Spink, Miles 
Vokes, W. A. Warren, J. W. Woods. 

Board of Arbitration— Geo. H. Baird, Hugh 
Blain, Lieut. -Col. J. I. Davidson, D. O. Ellis, 
M. C. Ellis, Thos. Flynn, S. R. Hart. W. D. 
Matthews, J. C. McKeggie. W. K. McNaught, D. 
M Spink, W. M. Stark. 

Industrial Exhibition Board— S. E. Briggs, John 
Carrick, Geo. Edwards, R. Y. Ellis, R. W. Elliott, 
Geo. H. Gooderham, W. P. Gundy, Thos. H. Lee. 

Representatives on Harbor Commission— Barlow 
Cumberland, J. T. Matthews. 

The annual address of President Ames 
was comprehensive and interesting. The 



attitude of the board in regard to technical 
education had, he said, always been that 
the country should adopt a vigorous policy 
of scientific education. He added : " The 
importance of better instruction to artisans, 
and to those who have to master the still 
higher branches of mechanical effort, is 
being recognized by the Provincial and 
Dominion Governments to a large extent, 
but it is very much to be desired in the 
interests of the country, that still greater 
earnestness be directed to evolution along 
these lines upon thoroughly scientific and 
practical bases." 

The subject of the Bell Telephone Co. 
Mr. Ames prefaced with the disclaimer o 
any idea of hostility to that institution. The 
naturally monopolistic nature of the busi- 
ness of the company, however, rendered it 
necessary that patrons should be protected. 
The increased charge for long distance 
apparatus, the increase of stock in 1892 
from $2,000,000 to $5,000,000, the attempt 
to increase rates in 1897, which was resisted 
by the board, Toronto City Council and 
other bodies, and the Bill of last session to 
increase the capital stock were all touched 
upon. 

He said he desired to impress upon all 
citizens their responsibility in developing 
Canada, and by broad intelligence and 
business integrity Canadian goods of every 
kind should be of the highest character pos- 
sible, so that they could compete with any 
in the world. 

Now that the tariff, or the means of secur- 
ing commercial prosperity, was considered 
too big a question to be played with for 
party advantage, Mr. Ames urged that 
public attention should be concentrated not 
upon party, but upon the best means of 
enhancing the development of Canada, and 
to this end he would like to see a greater 
feeling of independence in the rank and file 
in regard to party lines. While the tariff 
was sleeping, Mr. Ames thus urged the syste- 
matic study of Canadian industries: "As 
has been said, the tariff is out of politics, 
but that is only a passive state. It seems to 
me that what we need during the next five 
years, starting now, is the energetic con- 
sideration by our Governments of all the 
conditions under which the citizens of this 
country do business. It will be a great day 
for Canada when the strife between the two 
parties is wholly as to which can best dis- 
cover and supply the country's needs, and 
when the electorate distributes the rewards 
of office for success in this direction and 
without prejudice as to the name the party 
bears." 



The president's report was adopted amid 
applause upon the motion of Mr. Hugh 
Blain, who congratulated the president upon 
its interesting and valuable character. 

Mr. J. D. Allan also spoke in reference 
to the report, and also in regard to the 
resolution of condolence with the family of 
the late Walter S. Lee, a valued member of 
the board since 1864, which resolution was 
passed in the usual form. 

Mr. J. W. Woods, in the absence of Mr. 
J. L. Spink through illness, moved the 
resolution making retiring Secretary Wills 
an honorary life member, to which Mr. 
Wills replied briefly. 

Mr. D. Rose suggested that Dr. Mon- 
tague be asked to lecture before the board 
on Australian trade matters. The question 
was left over for further consideration. 

The resolution in regard to urging Britain 
to adopt a preferential tariff on wheat was 
held over to be discussed on Wednesday, 
February 5, and on motion of Mr. Hugh 
Blain members will be supplied with printed 
copies. 

A NEW BOARD AT ALMONTE. 

A board of trade has been formed at 
Almonte, Ont. On January 22 about 40 of 
the leading citizens and business men 
attended an open meeting presided over by 
Bennett Rosamond, M.P., at which a com- 
mittee was appointed to take the steps 
necessary before applying to the Secretary 
of State for incorporation. An application 
for a charter was signed by those present, 
and, it is hoped within a short time the 
board will be fully organized. 

The meeting was addressed by the chair- 
man, Bennett Rosamond, M.P., who said 
the town, if they had had a board of trade 
two years ago, would not have had a worth- 
less lighting plant, and been compelled to 
pay twice as much for water-power as they 
should. 

K. Eardley-Wilmot has had a good deal 
fo do with interesting the business men 
in this matter. He said that, coming 

WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 
WIRE^^ 

Prompt Shipment!. 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 
HAMILTON, ONT, 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



as a stranger, there seemed to be a 
lot of mismanagement in that town, and 
that a board of trade would guard the 
interests of the town. 

A number of others, including J. Robert- 
son, Squire Smith, Wm. Thoburn, M. 
Grey, also thought it a good move to 
establish a board of trade. 

The committee appointed consists of B. 
Rosamond, M.P., K. Eardley-Wilmot, W. 
H. Stafford, J. Robertson and Mayor 
Simpson. These will take the steps neces- 
sary to obtain a charter. 

K. Eardley-Wilmot has been elected 
secretary pro tem. 

A POETICAL SECRETARY. 

Secretary George E. Calkin, of the Kent- 
ville, N.S., Board of Trade, is of a some- 
what poetical turn of mind. And, in calling 
the recent annual meeting of the board, he 
dropped into verse in order to emphasize 
upon the members the necessity of taking 
a lively interest in that organization. There 
were nearly 70 lines in his effusion, the 
concluding verse of which ran : 

Then stir up the laggard 

And push out the drone, 

Let us all strive together 

To better our town, 

For we are not merely 

The power behind, 

We are People and Throne. 

Some may be disposed to criticize the 

poetry, but no fault can be found with the 

sentiment. 

SUMMERSIDE BOARD OF TRADE. 

There was a good attendance at the 
annual meeting of the Summerside, P. E.I., 
Board of Trade, on January 22, when Hon. 
R. C. McLeod, the president of the board, 
gave a resume of the year's work. In his 
speech he dwelt particularly with an ex- 
periment now being tried on the Summer- 
side Tormentine route. 

A resolution was passed complimenting 
Hon. Jas. Sutherland on his appointment as 
Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

The meeting was also addressed by J. A. 
Brace. Neil McQuarrie, Wm. Stewart, and 
Richard Hunt. Several remarks were made 
by other members of the board on the 
year's work of the council. The following 
are the officers elected : 

President — Hon. R. C. McLeod (reelected). 

Vice-President — Neil McQuarrie (reelected). 

Secretary — D. K Currie (reelected). 

Auditors — John Grady, J. S. Hinton. 

Council of Board of Trade— J. A. Brace, W. A. 
Brennan, Ronald Campbell, George Godkin, R. 
T. Holman, Richard Hunt, Joseph Read, David 
Rogers, John A. Sharp, Neil Sinclair. 



SOLD HIS STOCK. 

W. J. Leed, of London, has disposed of 
the hardware stock of W. S. Rodgers & 
Son, Glencoe, Ont. , which he had recently 
purchased, to T. Poole, of the same place. 



The Four Factors 

that bring success to S.'W.P. Agents are 

S.-W.P. Methods, 
S.-W.P. System, 
S.-W.P. Advertising, 
S.-W.P. Quality. 

With quality alone S.-W.P. can place any paint dealer 
at the head of the business in his locality, but we don't 
depend on quality alone. We back the quality up with 
methods, system, and advertising that insures success from 
the start. The combination can't be beat, and will win out 
against any competition, anywhere paint is sold. 

If you want to learn in detail about these four factors, 
send a postal card today for the " B-13 Booklet." It is 
full of valuable information. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 




CHICAGO, 
NEW YORK, 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND. 
NEWARK, BOSTON, SAN FRANCISCO. 

MONTREAL, TORONTO, KANSAS CITY. 




CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

CANADA WOOD SPHCIALTY CO. 

In a tastefully gotten up and neatly 
printed circular the Canadian Wood Speci- 
alty Co., Limited, of Orillia, are announcing 
to their friends and patrons that the business- 
es carried on by the Canada Wood Specialty 
Co. and N. Janes & Son have been 
amalgamated under the name and style 
of The Canada Wood Specialty Company, 
Limited. They state that they will continue 
the manufacture of birch and maple flooring, 
turned goods, and a full line of veneer 
work. They will by the new building kilns 
and up-to date machinery be able to turn 
out first-class work on very short notice. 

A FREEZER CATALOGUE. 

North Bros. Manufacturing Co., Phila- 
delphia, Ta., are the makers of a large 
variety of ice cream freezers embodying all 
that is best and of intrinsic merit in an ice 
cream freezer. These are distinguished 
from all others by such practical features as 
automatic twin scrapers and drawn-steel 
bottom cans tbat will not break. The pails 
are of cedar with electric welded wire hoops 
that are guaranteed not to break. All sizes 
from the 1 quart " Lightning " to the 40- 
quart "machine" freezer are carried in 
stock by this firm, who are also prepared to 
furnish to the wholesale jobbing trade ice 



crushers, packing tubs and cans for ice 
cream makers, and ice chippers and shavers 
for home use. 

This firm are also the makers of the 
"Yankee" tools, simple in construction, 
strong, durable, smooth workers and hand- 
somely finished, and they will not get out of 
order. These consist of screwdrivers of 
various patterns and also a number of 
different varieties of drill points for 
carpenters, cabinetmakers, etc., for boring 
wood for such various put poses as the 
setting of screws, nails and brads. 

Both their ice cream freezers and 
' ' Yankee ' ' tools have received the highest 
awards for machines and tools of their kind 
at the Philadelphia Export Exposition of 
1899 and the Paris Exposition of 1900. 

Their handsome little catalogue and price 
list for 1902 will be mailed to our readers 
on application. Mention Hardware and 
Metal when you write. 



A SPORTING GOODS CATALOGUE. 

It is only the ordinary thing for big firms 
to get out catalogues of their goods every 
year, but it is decidedly out of the ordinary 
when one comes across a catalogue like that 
of John Millen & Sons, Montreal and 
Toronto, which has recently been issued 
for 1902. Bicycles and bicycle parts are a 
specialty in this house, so the first part of 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



the catalogue is devoted to these. Every- 
thing imaginable that is used in connection 
with bicycles may be found here, all illus- 
trated in either half-tone, line or zinc en- 
gravings. The cuts show up well, and, in 
addition, a perfect idea of the goods can be 
obtained from the descriptive text which 
accompanies each. Other sporting goods, 
guns, fishing rods and tackle, baseball, 
tennis, hockey, golf and lacrosse necessaries, 
besides a great many other things in the 
hardware line, are advertised in this cata- 
logue. 

But the chief interest centres in the last 
portion of the book. It is a key catalogue, 
and contains 30 pages, fully illustrative of 
the great variety of keys carried by this 
house. They are of every shape, size and 
price. If only to have this assortment of 
keys alone the catalogue is valuable, but, 
as a means of to all sorts of light hardware 
and sporting goods, there is nothing like it. 
The catalogues are being sent out, and 
dealers who do not receive one will miss 
much if they neglect to drop a card to the 
firm asking for a copy. 



PAINTS FOR RETAILERS. 

An article of merit, well advertised, and 
attractive. Dealers handling "Zanzibar" 
paints have these three things to aid them : 
These paints are of unquestionable high 
merit and always uniform ; advertising 
matter in the most attractive form is 
furnished ; and the lithographed labels 
used on all cans are among the most hand- 
some used in the Dominion. The Zanzibar 
Paint Co., Limited, are sole manufacturers. 



HAMILTON BRANCH ORGANIZING. 

A large number of Hamilton retail mer- 
chants gathered in the. Board of Trade 
Rooms, Hamilton, on January 22 to lis- 
ten to President Rogers, of The Toronto 
branch of The Retail Merchants' Associa- 
tion, and Secretary Trowern address them 
on the advisability of forming a branch 
in Hamilton. A number of Hamilton 
merchants gave their views, after which 
they decided to organize a branch of The 
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada 
in Hamilton. 

A committee . consisting of T. 0. Car- 
penter, H. Hiland, Albert Case, J. T. 
Clarke, Win. Bews, James Dunlop, Bur- 
well Griffin, F. R. Newberry, G. S. Klein, 
and Win. Fr'aser were appointed to make 
the necessary arrangements. 



Hyacinthe Sylvestre, of Sylvestre, 
Hyacinthe & Son, hardware merchants, 
Montreal, is dead. 

The foundry of The T. H. MacLean 
Manufacturing Co., Limited, was recently 
burned down. The loss is covered by 
insurance. 



IVER JOHNSON BICYCLES 



NEWEST AND LATEST TRUSS FRAME 



The Truss frame 
satisfies that 
longing for 
something new 
and good in a 
bicycle — it pos- 
sesses the ad- 
vantage of rac- 
ing weight and 
roadster strength 
—a rigid crank 
hanger— greater 
speed— no buck- ', 
ling of frame — 
Made of one- 
inch Tubing. 



Agents wanted 
in unoccupied 
territory ; send 

for new catalog 

just issued. 




(FRAME PATENTED.) 



New York Salesroom— 

00 Chambers Street. 



IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 

- FITCHBURG, MASS., U.S.A. 



Zanzibar Paints 

We do not say " there are no other good paints " ; we do not have to sell 
our paints in that way, but we do say ZANZIBAR PAINTS 

in point of service and appearance are unequalled. Do you carry them in 
stock? You should. Write for our "Terse Talks." 



THE ZANZIBAR PAINT CO., Limited 



Toronto, Can. 



"PAGE METAL GATES are solow in pried 

no one can afford 
to use wooden ones. Light, and yet strong enough to sup- 
port a heavy man on the end while ha swings around the 
circle without causing them to sag. They are neat in 
appearance, will last a lifetime. Will not sag nor get rickety. 
They are supplied with latches which allow them to be open- 
ed either way and are self acting. The only good metal gate 
1 low enough in price for Seneral farm purposes. We also make Farm and Ornamental 
, Poultry Netting, Nails and Staples. The Page Wire Fence Co. .Limited, Walkerville, 0n» 1 



:;::::::-M;;::::t: ; ::v 



STANYON ENGINEERING CO. 



'Phone Main 2177. 



402 MCKINNON BUILDING, 



TORONTO 



CONTRACTING AND CONSULTING ENGINEERS. 

Steel Works, all kinds of Rolling Mills, Wire Mills, etc., all built complete. Machinery designed for any purpose. 
General Offices, - - PITTSBURG, Pa. 



YOUR ORDER FOR 



Coiled Sbrjnq Wire 



and all other kinds of fence wire, staples, 
pliers, stretchers, reels, steel gates and 
general fencing supplies can be supplied 
on shortest notice, best quality and 
lowest prices, by— 

THE LONDON FENCE MACHINE CO., 



Limited. 



LONDON, ONTARIO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 



■.■,.■■..■.■..■■■,■,...■■,.■■■„■■■,■■.■,■■.■■■■■,■■„,„.■„ 



1TIE ADVERTISING ARENA. 



'I MMMM | ' JMM f M 



A LESSON IN ADVERTISING 

A WHOLESALER, according to Hard- 
ware Trade, in New York had one of 
the brightest and most impressive 
lectures on advertising read to him by a 
country merchant, that he has ever heard in 
his life. The country merchant is one of 
the ordinary merchants. He is a character 
in his way, a Hibernian, and with his full 
share of the proverbial wit. He was on a 
buying trip, and passing a wholesale house 
he observed paper napkins in the window. 
He went in to look at them, for he had sale 
for such things in his store. 

"An 1 do ye have paper napkins to 
sell?" he asked of the wholesaler. He 
did have them, he said. "An' how the 
devil do I be knowin' that ye have paper 
napkins to sell, if I don't come down here 
and happen to see them in the windy ? 
Why don't ye tell a man ye have paper 
napkins ? Why don't ye advertise ? Thin 
we'd know what ye had to sell." The 
merchant told him that he did advertise, 
which was true. , 

"Ah, yis," said the merchant, "an' how 
do ye advertise ? Ye put a cut of yer 
buildin' in the paper. Now what the devil 
do I be wantin' to see the cut of your 
buildin' for ? I don't care for yer old 
buildin'. It's what's in yer buildin' that 
interests me. If ye have paper napkins, 
say ye have paper napkins, and don't be 
showin' us a picture of your big sthore. 
That's the way I'm a-goin to sell these 
paper napkins I'm buyin' of ye. I put an 
advertisement in me paper at home to till 
the people of me town that I have paper 
napkins to sell and the price they have to 
pay for thim, an' be the powers they come 
an' buy thim." 

This wholesaler told me that he had more 
good advertising sense rubbed into him in 
10 minutes by this merchant than he had 
found in books in the past 10 years. 

JOHN KNOWS IT. 

A. newspaper whose columns oveiflow 
with advertisements of business men has 
more influence in attracting attention to 
building up a town than any other agency 
that can be employed. People go where 
there is business. Capital and labor go 
where there is an enterprising community. 
No power on earth is so strong to build up 
a town as well as a paper well patronized, 
and its power should be appreciated. The 
man who overlooks his town paper injures 



■HTTT»TTTTTTTTTTTTTTT¥T¥T1T MMMM TT>TTTTTT» MM I HH 

himself by injuring his town and townsmen. 
— John Wanamaker. 

SOME SAMPLE ADS. 



To Clean Out 
Our Stock of 
Skates 

We have made a reduction all 
along the line in all styles and 
qualities. Besides our regular 
stock we have a large number of 
shopworn skates — the accumula- 
tion of several years past, which 
we will sell at bargains. We 
will show you skates, and good 
ones, too, from 35c. up. 



After Inventory 
Sale 

We finished up the taking of 
inventory this week and we 
found quite a number of season- 
able suits that will be of more 
benefit to you than to us — there- 
fore we have made a substantial 
reduction in price — a reduction 
that ought to clean every one out 
in quick order. 

We maintain that no ready- 
made clothing can surpass the 
kind we sell — it is made to wear 
and made to fit — and you'll agree 
with us. if you come in, that the 
price isn't a matter you can 
object to. 

Your credit is good. 



— Printers' Ink. 



^miimn.iirn^. 

Jeweled 3; 

Rings «: 

and * 

Diamond ;: 

Hearts 5 : 



HOW MUCH MONEY TO SPEND? 

Truly an interesting question. It all 
depends upon the goods and the competi- 
tion. Another good question to ask is, Who 
else is in the field and how well are they 
occupying it ? 

Take baking powder. It will be conceded 
that this article has been well advertised. 
There was a time when a manufacturer 
might have started a baking powder busi- 



ness with small capital, and by judicious 
effort had a good chance to win out. That 
time has passed. There is no use talking 
about trusts and their good or bad features. 
Let politicians do that. The fact remains 
that a firm that has gone in and possessed 
the land, is making a good article and has a 
strong and sensible advertising policy, is in 
a position to continue. Before the business 
can be diverted to any great extent it will 
be necessary to get a better article or spend 
more money pushing it. Another thing. 
The new article must be a good deal better, 
and the big concern generally sees to it that 
theirs is about as good as can be made. 

I knew a firm that did not believe this. 
They were going to sell to jobbers at better 
discounts, give retail men more profit and 
sell an article just as good. The jobber and 
retail man would be glad to push it along, 
you know, because they would get larger 
profits. 

They forgot about the public. 

I asked them, " How much money have 
you got ? " They seemed to think it was 
none of my business. Then I asked them 
how much money they would put up and be 
able to lose without seriously imperilling 
their capital. This seemed easier, and at 
last I learned that they would put up $2,000. 
This was to include their advertising expenses 
and my service. Two thousand dollars 
against the combined result of possibly a 
million. Their great point was that they 
would reinvest their profits. Reinvesting 
profits looks easy, but it is the rock upon 
which many a concern has gone up against to 
disaster. The trouble is there are no profits 
to reinvest. One dash, one chance in a 
hundred, and nothing behind it to give 
them another chance for their money. 

I thanked them for the offer, but refused 
the service, and explained my reason. Other 
heads were bowed beside the remains of 
foolish advertising experiments. They pro- 
bably think advertising doesn't pay. 

How much to spend ? It must be enough 
to justify a reasonable hope of success. No 
one knows absolutely in advance what will 
be the result of advertising effort. Those 
with most experience and ability can make 
the closest guess, and they try the best plan 
first, but are sure to keep enough money in 
reserve to be able to change the policy if 
necessary. 

Some lines can be tried with little money. 
They are most inviting. Other lines require 
enough money to make a positive disturb- 
ance before results can be expected. They 
must make noise enough to be heard by all 
the people before trade can be expected to 
move in their direction. 

The foolish man thinks only of his own 
business. The wonderful goodness of his 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



product, and the money he can make by 
reinvesting his profits. The wise man 
studies the situation from the buyer's stand- 
point. He makes up his mind in advance 
as to how much publicity he must have 
before he can expect success, and then sits 
down and counts his money. 

The exception ? Oh, yes, there are 
exceptions to this rule. Nobody knows 
what the percentage is, but experienced 
advertising men can think of but few. 
Some have spent money and won in viola- 
tion of all rules of business sense. Chance, 
luck, gamble. The exception is so small 
that it cuts no figure. The real advertising 
work has been done, as it should be, by 
someone who knows the facts and has the 
sagacity to understand how much money to 
spend. — Seth Brown, in Printers' Ink. 



ADVERTISING JOB LOTS. 

The "job lot," " closing out slaughter " 
and other well-known reasons for sales have 
been so overworked in advertising that most 
people are aware of their sham. Probably 
there will be a change in the tenor of such 
publicity ere long, though it is difficult to 
say what form it will take. The store which 
advertises good wares at a decent profit, 
dwelling upon quality and reliability, pro- 
bably succeeds as well as the establishment 
which is continually in the throes of its 
mistakes in buying and efforts to help the 
manufacturer unload. In the case of the 
department stores the special sale is likely 
to last a long while yet, but some of the 
better-known New York advertisers never 
use the price reduction sale as an argument 
in their ads., or use it so rarely that it is 
always effective by way of contrast. — 
Printers' Ink. 

CHOOSE CAREFULLV. 

It is a good plan for those just starting in 
the mail-order business to use their own 
judgment and observation as to what line 
they shall handle and not put too much 
confidence in the various cheap guides and 
catalogues which profess to give the begin- 
ner a list of the things he should carry in 
stock. What will sell in one locality may 
not be at all in demand in another. Before 
starting look around and see what are the 
articles most likely to be in demand among 
the class of people most easily reached by 
you. — White's Sayings. 

THE GOOD AD. 

A good ad., remarks The Brookline 
Chronicle, is an announcement in brief 
terms, straight from the shoulder, concise 
and to the point, telling something in a 
clear and intelligent manner and stating a 
few prices as an indicator of the way you 
sell goods or do work. 



JONES BROS. 

Stove Biick Manufacturers, Fire Clay and Asbestos, 
Furnace Cement, all kinds of Fire Clay Products 
made to order from patterns. 
BRACONDALE P.O., ONT. (near Toronto. 



Lace Leather 

Send direct to us for the celebrated 
" NIAGARA " Brand Lace Leather, best 
produced in this country. Yellow and 
White in Sides or Cut Strings. Prices and 
Samples on application, 

WOOD BROS. 

Tanners of High-Class Leathers, 
ST. CATHARINES, ONT. 



Lockerby & McComb 

AGENTS IN CANADA 

FOR THE 

Celebrated P. & B. 

Cold Storage Lining 

AND 

. . Ruberoid Roofing . . 

P. S. --Prices on Application. 

65 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 

THE OAKVILLE 

BASKET CO., 

Manufacturers of 
i, 2, 3 Bushel 

Grain 

AND 




Root 

B asKeTs 

THE OAKVILLE 
BASKET CO. 




pIFTY per cent, more useful 
light from the same amount 
of current. 

For sale by all dealers In 
Electrical Supplies. 



The ONTARIO LANTERN GO. 



WALTER GROSE, 

Selling Agent, 
Montreal. 



MANUFACTURERS, 

HAMILTON. 



To Oven Builders, 

Etc. 

The Canadian Patent 
Rights of Prym's Patent 

Oven (patented in thirteen 
countries), which has the 
unique benefit of being 
evenly heated on all six 
sides at the same time, are 
offered for sale, and can be 
obtained by applying to 

J. CULBERT, 



4 Monkwell St. 



LONDON, E.C., ENG. 



TRADE 




MARK 



M'obles 8? Hoare. 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 

Which can be obtained direct from tbe works 
or from tbe principal Color Dealers In Canada. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



v 






> 



Simple enough, isn't it? 

No complicated machinery to get out of order. All the gearing is enclosed 
in this ball-like frame so it is impossible to catch ice and salt The 
expense of making ice cream is only the cost of the materials if you use a 

Peerless Iceland Freezer 

(One Motion) 

It is the simplest freezer made and the easiest to turn Three minutes is 
the freezing time. Much pleasanter than standing over a hot stove in hot 
weather, and frozen desserts are more wholesome and delicious. Write 
for booklet "Ice Cream Secrets" for those who know and those who don't. 
Gives many new receipts, as well as good old stand bys, all easy to make. 

To Remove all Doubt : If you've never made ice cream at home, or if you have had 
enough experience with another freezer, get a Peerless Iceland from your dealer, take it 
home, and if not perfectly pleased, return it, and dealer tvi'l refund your money. If your 
dealer hasn't it. he can get it : or write us and we will see that you are supplied. Be sure 
and get a Peerless Iceland. Kasily recognized from above photograph; notice label. 

DAJVA & CO., Dept A, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

The Peerless Ice Chipper chips the ice properly, saves ice, saves time, saves your temper. 



Is this Ad. big enough to be seen? 

It is another of a series that will appear in all the leading magazines and ladies' papers 
this Spring and Summer. All of your women customers take one or more of these pub- 
lications. Don't you want to have your store identified with the very best advertising? 

Order Peerless Iceland Freezers and Peerless Ice Chippers from your jobber early 
so that he can put you in touch with our advertising department. If yours doesn't 
handle them see one who does, or write us and we will see that you are supplied. 

DANA & CO., Cincinnati. 



NewYorK: 10 Warren St. 



San Francisco : 105 Front St. 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




ANOTHER LETTER RE LINSEED OIL. 

Editor Hardware and Metal, — In 
your issue of January 25 there appeared a 
letter from a reputed dealer in Canadian 
linseed oil in reply to my letter in a pre- 
vious issue regarding the quality of English 
linseed oil offered in this market. It is quite 
evident your correspondent knows very little 
of the linseed oil trade when he speaks of 
price variations of from £$ to £10 per ton 
between oil produced from British India seed 
and that made from seed of other countries. 
If there were such a difference in price I am 
afraid very little Calcutta linseed oil would 
be imported to Canada. While Argentine 
seed may be sold at a slightly lower price 
than Calcutta seed, I do not believe that 
were Argentine seed used exclusively the 
difference in production would exceed £1 
per ton, besides which, in the latter event, 
the oil would not be allowed into Canada 
under the preferential tariff, so that the 
actual cost of Argentine seed oil in Canada 
would be more than Calcutta seed oil. 

Your correspondent produces figures to 
show that about 18 per cent, of the flaxseed 
imported into England is from foreign 
countries. Assuming this to be correct, we 
must take into consideration the fact that 
the United States and Russia are foreign 
countries, and, deducting their proportion, 
we could no doubt reduce the percentage of 
Argentine seed to 10 per cent, of the total 
imports. 

If, as your correspondent states, the Eng- 
lish crushers are compelled to use from 30 
to 40 per cent, of Argentine seed to get the 
quality of oil they desire, perhaps he can 
explain how they manage to get hold of the 
remaining 20 to 30 per cent, of Argentine 
seed to supply their wants. Then, again, as 
it is not customary for anyone to desire an 
inferior article when they can get the best 
article for the same money, one must natur- 
ally conclude from your correspondent's 
remarks that English crushers are obliged 
to use a proportion of Argentine seed to im- 
prove the oil. 

Your correspondent claims that the bulk 
of English linseed oil imported into Canada 
comes in May, June and July. As the 
greatest consumption of oil takes place dur- 
ing these months, I would like to know how 
he could expect it to come at any other 
time. 

Will your correspondent explain how it is 
that Canadian crushers buy foreign seed 
from which to make their oil if it is so in- 
ferior to any seed grown in British posses 



sions ? I know that American seed enters 
largely into the manufacture of linseed oil 
in Canada, and I should not be surprised if 
even Argentine seed is crushed in Canada. 
Under these circumstances how does he ex- 
plain the superiority of Canadian oil? Does 
the fact of crushing the seed in Canada 
make it any better or must we attribute it 
to superior workmanship or improved plant? 
If so, Canadian crushers must have made 
phenomenal strides in the few years they 
have been engaged in the oil industry. 
They have certainly not been at it very 
many years. 

If seed grown on this continent is so very 
much superior to foreign seed why do the 
Americans export their own seed and im- 
port Argentine seed ? 

If so called Canadian oil is so very 
superior to English oil why do some of our 
leading paint manufacturers give the prefer- 
ence to English oil ? I know of more than 
one instance where I have given a buyer 
the option of taking his contract out in 
English or Canadian oil, and he has chosen 
the English oil. 

My inquiries regarding English linseed 
oil have elicited entirely different informa- 
tion to that volunteered by your correspond- 
ent, and I am informed that 99 per cent, of 
English oil coming to Canada is crushed 
from Calcutta seed, besides which, a sworn 
declaration to this effect accompanies every 
shipment that comes to our firm. We have 
no reason to doubt this statement which 
comes from the combined largest seed 
crushing interests in the world. 

With all due respect to your correspond- 
ent, I trust I may be permitted to suggest 
that he bases his arguments mainly on hear- 
say evidence, and I should not be surprised 
to learn that his writing has been prompted 
by one or more of the western merchants 
who have combined the last few years in an 
effort to maintain high prices, and whose 
pecuniary interests have possibly suffered 
through the competition of English linseed 
oil. 

J. Watterson. 
Montreal, January 28. 



A FUEL SAVER. 

Editor Hardware and Metal, — As you 
are always interested in new enterprises, I 
write to inform you of a movement on foot 
in this enterprising and go a-head town to 
form a company for the manufacture of the 



West fuel-saving device. At our invitation, 
Mr. Porter, of Buffalo, came here and has 
allowed us to investigate the device, the 
patents of which he is the owner. We have 
tried it under different conditions on all 
kinds of stoves for coal, and the verdict in 
all cases has been with those who have tried 
it that they can effect a saving of from 
33/4 to 5° P er cent - The device is simple 
in operation, requires no care and is a 
vigilant guard as to the economy in fuel 
saving. 

The front drafts of the stove or range are 
completely closed, and it takes in the air 
from a very small hole at the back of the 
stove. The air is heated to the same 
temperature as the fire in the stove, causing 
the carbonic acid gas to completely reduce 
to fine ashes the carbon or coal. It is an 
old principle newly applied, and is a 
marvel of perfection. There are no clinkers, 
the gas is all consumed before reaching the 
stovepipes, and there is no danger of any- 
one suffering from escaping gas. 

The Paulin Co., 
Ptfr T. G. Watson. 
Simcoe, Ont., January 28, 1902. 



SHERWIN-WILLIAMS WON. 

The sporting members of the staff of The 
Sherwin Williams Co. and The Canada 
Paint Co. met on the Crystal Rink, Mont- 
real, on Thursday night (January 23) and 
played a friendly game ot hockey that all 
the onlookers considered pretty fast. Judg- 
ing by the noise made by the supporters of 
either side, it was the most brilliant game 
ever played. 

The Sherwin-Williams people left the 
rink blowing tin horns and doing other 
things that ought to be done when the 
enemy has been beaten by 4 to 1, for such 
was the score. Two of the Sherwin- 
Williams Company's Cleveland officials, 
Mr. Martin, manager of the trade sales 
department, and Mr. Ford, the advertising 
manager, who were enjoying their first sight 
of Canada's national winter sport, felt so 
proud of their team that they entertained 
tbem to an oyster supper afterwards. A 
return match is likely to be played shortly. 

AGENTS WANTED. 

Wanted— a manufacturers' selling 
Agent for paper mill. Must have experience in 
brown, manila and print wrappings Address, with 
references, to Alex. McArthur & Co., 82 McGill St., 
Montreal. (6) 

FOR SALE. 

GOOD HARDWARE AND TINWARE Busi- 
ness and premises in small town, splendid 
farming locality. No opposition. Excellent oppor- 
tunity for two live men. Too much work for 
owner. Apply, Box 76, Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. (5) 



WE ARE NOT IN THE TRUST. 



Quality of our goods guaranteed and our discounts very i 
■ liberal. A trial order solicited. Write for discounts. 



s. 



99 Niagara St., TORONTO FILE CO. 

CANADIAN GOODS FOR CANADIANS 



s. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



John Bowman 

HARDWARE & COAL CO. 

LONDON, ONT. 



SKATES SKATES SKATES 

V We have a large stock of Skates to dispose of 
anH will fill all orders promptly at closest prices. 

Cutlery Cutlery Cutlery 



ipecial Lines 



Special Prices 



English and German Table and Pocket 
Cutlery, Cases, Carvers, Razors, Scis- 
sors, Pen and Pocket and Table Cutlery 
in great variety. 



ri 




After Stock-Taking 

You will be replenishing your stock, so we wish 
to keep before your notice, "Dominion" Goods, all of which 
bear the following Trade Mark, which is a guarantee of quality: 



SHELF 
GOODS 




HEAVY 
GOODS 



Wood Screws, 

Wire Nails, (Papers), 
Bright Wire Goods, 

Wire Door Pulls, 
Steel and Brass Jack Chain, 
"Crescent" Wire Coat 

and Hat Hooks. 



Wire Nails. 
Iron and Steel, 
Brass and Copper, 
Hay Baling, 
Pulp Binding, 
Galvanized, 
Barbed. 



w 
I 

R 
E 



Bright and Galvanized 
Fence. 



Bed, Blind, ) 

andPoultr, STAPLES 

Netting. J 

BROOM, MATTRESS. BOTTLING, 
and other wires. 

Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co. 



MONTREAL 



Limited 



TORONTO 



ESTABLISHED I 860. 



INCORPORATED 1895, 



Milk Cans '-Milk Can Trimmings 



TN addition to our regular lines of Milk Cans, we have 
this year introduced a new feature that is sure to be appre- 
ciated by every farmer — by sinking the handles into the 
body of Can, making them flush with body (as shown in cut) 
thereby doing away with the complaint of the handle of one Can 
knocking holes into and bruising the other Cans. 

Handles sunk in this way will carry much heavier weight, as 
well as stiffen body of the Cans. To distinguish this Can from 
our other lines, it is called the "Eureka." All our Broad 
Hoop Milk Cans are made with our Patent Roll Bottoms. 



Patented January, 1901. 



THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL, P.Q. 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, January 31, 1902, 
HARDWARE. 

THERE is a good business doing on 
orders for Spring delivery, as well 
as increased trade for smaller lots 
for present requirements. On the whole 
this week has been the best of the year, 
so far, and in addition to the sales 
effected, collections are reported fair. 
There is no special feature in the mar- 
ket. Prices on all lines seem to be preity 
steady. 

BARB WIRE.— Business for spring is 
fairly active. The price is $3 per 100 lb. 
f.o.b. Montreal. 

GALVANIZED W1RK— In this there is 
not as much doing. We quote as follows : 
Nos. 6, 7 and 8 gauge, $3.45 ; No. 9, 
82.80; No. 10. 83.55; No. II, §3.65; No. 
12, $2.95. No. 13, $3.05 ;> No. 14, $4.05: 
No. 15, 84.55 ; No. 16, $4.80 ; No. 17, 
$5.20 ; No. 18, $5.45. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE— A good de- 
mand continues. Bright iron and 
annealed. Nos. to 9, sell for $2.60 per 
100 lb. f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamil- 
ton, London, St. John and Halifax. We 
quote extras as follows : No. 10, 6c.; No. 
11. 12c.; No. 12, 20c; No. 13, 30c.; No. 
14, 40c; No. 15, 55c: No. 16, 70c 



FINE WIRE.— A moderate trade is 
doing. The discount is 22^ per cent. 

SPRING WIRE.— This is about the 
same. There is a small movement. We 
quote $1 .25 extra. 

COPPERED AND TINNED WIRE - 
Trade is rather dull. Coppered, extra. 
60c; tinned. $2 per 100 lb. 

BRASS AND COPPER WIRE.— There is 
only a moderate demand. The discount 
on both wires is 60 per cent. 

FENCE STAPLES.— There is" not much 
doing. The discount oir poultry net 
staples has been changed from 25 per 
cent, to 30 per cent. Blind staples are 
now 4ti per cent. Fence staples, we 
quote, per 100-lb. keg, bright, $2.90 ; 
galvanized, $3.25. 

WIRE NAILS. — There is a growing de- 
mand in wire nails. Trade is, however, 
quiet. Our quotations are as follows: 
$2.55 for small lots and $2.50 for car- 
lots f.o.b. Montreal. London. Hamilton, 
Toronto, Gananoque, Brantford, Windsor, 
Ont., St. John and Halifax. 

CUT NAILS. — A fair trade continues. 
We quote : $2.35 per keg for small lots 
and $2,274 f° r carlots. The discount on 
flour barrel and coopers' nails is 40 per 

cent . 

HORSE NAILS.— There is but little 
doing. We quote: "C" brand at 50 and 
7£ per cent, off and " M " brand at 60 



per cent, off on oval and new city heads 
and 66 2-3 per cent, off for new counter- 
sunk heads. 

HORSESHOES.— The demand for horse- 
shoes is very light. We quote : Iron 
shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 2 and 
larger, $3.50 ; No. 1 and smaller, $3.75 ; 
snow shoes, No. 2 and larger, $3.75 ; No. 
I and smaller, $4 ; X L steel shoes, all 
sizes, 1 to 5, No. 2 and larger, $3.60 ; 
No. 1 and smaller, $3.85 ; feather-weight, 
all. sizes; $4.85; toe weight, steel shoes, 
all sizes, $5.95 f.o.b. Montreal ; f.o.b. 
Hamilton, London and Guelph, 10c. 
extra. 

SCREWS. — A moderate demand is felt 
this week. It is a slight improvement 
over last week's business. Discounts are : 
Flat head bright, 87£ and 10 per cent. 
off list ; round head bright, 82£ and 10 
per cent.; flat head brass, 80 and 10 per 
cent.; round head brass, 75 and 10 per 
cent. 

BOLTS. — Several good orders for spring 
were booked this week. The demand, on 
the whole, is light. We quote : Norway 
carriage bolts, 60 and 5 per cent. ; 
common, 55 and 5 per cent.; full square 
carriage bolts, 60 and 5 per cent.; 
machine bolts, 55 and 5 per cent. ; coach 
screws, 70 per ' cent. ; sleigh shoe bolts. 
70 per cent. ; blank bolts, 60 per cent. ; 
bolt ends, 60 per cent. ; plough bolts. 55 
and 5 per cent. ; tire bolts, 67^ per cent.; 



SAMSON" MILK CANS i BOTTOMS 

THE ONLY PERFECT TRIMMING ON THE MARKET. 

Has many imitations, but being protected by patents its Sanitary, One-piece, 
and other leading features cannot be copied. 

All other styles of bottoms are pieced. 

The "Samson" is much stronger than pieced bottoms can 
possibly be made. 

Has no place for dirt or sour milk to lodge. 

Insist on getting "Samson" Milk Can Trimmings, and do 
not buy any other "just as good." 





Always 

in 
Stock 



"Samson" Delivery Cans and Pail Bottoms. 
Tinned Sheet Iron in all gauges and sizes. 



The IVIoClary IN/lQrujfso-turing Co., 



LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, AND 

" Everything -For the Tinshop." 



ST. JOHN, N.B. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



DRAIN PIPES, 
PORTLAND CEMENTS, 
FIRE BRICKS AND CLAY 
SILICA AND MAGNESIA 
BRICKS, 

with specially prepared mortar. 

Contractors' and Founders' 
Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SElEW! 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

« CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS. QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 



BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



The Robin Hood 
Powder Company 

taf 

If you want the best Trap or Game load in 
the world, buy "Robin Hood Smokeless," 
in " Robin Hood " Shells. It is quick, safe, 
and reliable. Try it for pattern and pene- 
tration from forty to seventy yards against 
any powder on the market. We make the 
powder, we make the shells, and we load 
them. Write for our booklet, " Powder 
Facts." 

The Robin Hood Powder 
Company — 

SWANTON, VT. 



stove bolts, 67^ per cent. To any retail- 
er an extra discount of 5 per cent, is 
allowed. Nuts, square, 3Jc. per lb. off 
list ; hexagon nuts, 4c. per lb. off list. 
To all retailers an extra discount of £c. 
per lb. is allowed. 

BUILDING PAPER.— A fairly good 
trade is being done and business is im- 
proving. We quote as follows : Tar- 
red felt, $1.70 per 100 lb.; 2-ply, 
ready roofing, 85c. per roll ; 3-ply, $1.10 
per roll ; carpet felt, $2.25 per 100 lb., 
dry sheathing, 35c. per roll ; tar sheath 
ing, 45c. per roll ; dry fibre, 55c. per roll, 
tarred fibre, 65c. per roll ; O.K. and I.X. 
L., 70c. per roll; heavy straw sheathing, 
$30 per ton ; slaters' felt, 60c. per roll. 

CORDAGE.— There is a fairly active 
market in cordage this week. Prices are 
steady. Binder twine is commencing to 
be inquired after, though the demand is 
only a very light one. It is quoted at 
9£c, sisal, ,and lie. for manila. We 
quote as follows : Manila, 16c; British 
Manila at 13£c; sisal, 12c. and lathyarn 
at 10-^c. Manitoba prices are : Manila, 
16c; British manila, 14^c; sisal, 13c. and 
lathyarn, 12c. 

RIVETS AND BURRS.— There is no 
improvement. The discounts are : Best 
iron rivets, section, carriage, and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., coop- 
ers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets,, 60 and 
10 per cent. ; swedes iron burrs are 
quoted at 55 per cent, off ; copper rivets, 
35 and 5 per cent, off, and coppered iron 
rivets and burrs, in 5-lb. carton boxes, 
are quoted at 60 and 10 per cent, off 
list. 

SCREEN WIRE CLOTH.— A fair busi- 
ness is doing at $1.25 per 100 square 
feet. 

POULTRY NETTING— This is being- 
inquired after more freely. Canadian or 
English is quoted at a discount of 60 
per cent, off 2 x 2 mesh, 19 wire, and 55 
per cent, off 2 x 2 mesh heavier, Can- 
adian list. 

HARVEST TOOLS.— There is an active 
market. The discount is 70 per cent. 

FIREBRICKS.— Only a moderate busi- 
ness is doing. We quote : Scotch, $19 to 
$23.50 and English, $1S.50 to $22.50 per 
1,000. 

CEMENT— Trade is dull. We quote ; 
German cement, $2.30 to $2.40 ; English, 
$2.25 to $2.35; Belgian, $1.70 to $1.95 
per bbl. ex-wharf, and American, $2.20 
to $2.30 ex-cars. 

METALS. 

There is a fair trade passing for the 
time of year, and prices in general are 
firm. Recent advices from the English 
markets show that prices on Canada 
plate and black sheets are very firm, 
which is likely to affect import orders 
for spring to a considerable extent. Cop- 
per on the United States markets has 
exhibited a firmer tone, and two advan- 
ces of -£c. have occurred during the week. 
This is thought to be due to the heavy 
buying- being done. The foreign markets 
also show advances in ingot copper and 
tinplates. 

PIG IRON. — A moderate trade is doing 
this week. A slight improvement is 
noticed. We quote . Summerlee, $21 to 
$21.50; Canadian, $18.50 to $19. 

BAR IRON.— There is a fair trade 
doing. Prices are quite firm. We quote 
as follows : Merchants' bar, in carlots, 
$1.87£, and in small lots, $1.95. Horse- 
shoe iron is worth $2.15 to $2.20. 

BLACK SHEETS.— There is not much 
business being done in this line. Our 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

Merchants Bank Building, 

MONTREAL 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

IRON, 

h3 / tZEZL, and 

METALS. 



IRON AND 
BRASS 

Pomps 

Foroe, Lift and Cittern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We cap 
supply your wants with 
—quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 

THE R. McDOUGALL CO., Limited, 
Manufacturers, GALT, CANADA. 

ADAffl HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 




We offer for prompt shipment 
F»ig Tin, 

L. & F. and STRAITS. 

got Copper, O.O. 
F*ig Lead. 
Spelter. 
Antimony. 



Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co,, Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers "f 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL. 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Your Spring stock will be up to date If 
selected from the following lines: 

ELASTIUTE VARNISH, 

Granitine Floor Finish 

Maple Leaf Coach Enamels 

Maple Leaf Varnish Stain 

Imperial Buggy Paint 

Imperial Varnish Stain 

Imperial Gold and Silver Enamels 

Imperial Household and Bath Enamels 

Aluminum Paint 

Flat Black Lacquer 

Bronzing Liquids 

Lemon Polishing Oil, Etc. 

ALSO — 

Shellacs, Japans and General Varnishes 
In all grades. 

A good reason why you should buy our goods is because we lead all 
others in neat and attractive packages, advertising signs, etc. And, above all, 
our goods make and hold customers for you. 

Write for 1902 descriptive catalogue and price lists. 



1 Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, ONT., CANADA 



LIMITED 



WILL YOU TAKE 
THE CHANCE 

of losing good customers by selling them 
an inferior paint— just because you can 
offer it for less money ; or do you want to 
build up business and establish a paying 
trade by selling paint you can recommend ? 

Ark Brand Paint 

will do the latter for you— cheap paint the 
former. Every can of "Ark Brand" Paint 
is guaranteed. 



Send your order direct if our travellers 
have not already seen you. 

,*♦ FRANCIS-FROST CV- 

TORONTO. 
Canadian Distributing Agents for Grippin's Crack Filler. 



quotations are as follows : 28 gauge, 
$2.65 ; 26 gauge, $2.60 ; 20 to 24 gauge, 
$2.50, and 8 to 20 gauge, $2.50. 

GALVANIZED IRON.— The demand is 
still small. We quote as follows : 
No. 28, Queen's Head, $4.40 ; Apollo, I0f 
oz., $4.40 ; Comet, $4.25 with 10c. extra 
in less than case lots. 

INGOT COPPER— The movement is 
not large. The price is 14^c 

INGOT TIN— The demand is only fair. 
Straits are worth 27c. 

PIG LEAD. — Business in pig lead is 
active. Prices are firm, but steady. We 
quote : $3.15 to $3.20. 

LEAD PIPE.— There is not much doing. 
Quotations! are 7£c for composition 
waste, and 7c. for ordinary. The dis- 
count is 35 per cent. 

IRON PIPE— In black pipe there is a 
very good demand and prices all around 
show a firmer tendency. Our quota- 
tions arc as follows : Black pipe, i- 
^2.75 per 100 feet ; f, $2.75 ; £, $3.15 ; 
%., $3.70 : 1-inch, $5.25 ; 1J, $7.40 ; 1£, 
$8.90 ; 2-inch, $12.25. Galvanized, f, 
$3.55 ; i, $4.15 ; f, $5.05 ; 1-inch, $7.25 ; 
1±, $10.10 ; 14, $12.15 ; 2-inch, $16.55. 

TINPLATES — There is a very small 
movement. We quote : Charcoal, $4.25 to 
$4:50 ; cokes, $3.75 to $4. 

CANADA PLATE.— There is a fair 
trade doing this week. We quote as fol- 
lows : 52's, $2.65 to $2.70 ; 60's, $2.75 
to $2.80; 75's, $2.80 to $2.85; full 
polished, $3.75, and galvanized, $4.25 to 
$4.35. 

STEEL.— There is a moderate business 
doing. Nothing new in prices. We quote : 
Sleigh shoe, $2.05 ; tire, $2.15 ; bar, $2 ; 
spring, $2.85 ; machinery, $3.00, and toe- 
calk, $2.60. 



SHEET STEEL.— Trade is fair. We 
mote : Nos. 10 to 20, $2.50 ; 3-16, $2.50; 
J, 5-16 and f, $2.40. 

TOOL STEEL. — A better inquiry is ex- 
perienced this week. We quote : Black 
Diamond, 8c; Jessop's, 13c. 

TERNE PLATES.— The market is still 
quiet. We quote : $7.75 to $8. 

COIL CHAIN.— A good business is 
being done on all lines. Prices are 
steady. .We quote as follows : No. 
6, 124c.; No. 5, lO^c; No. 4, 10c: 
No. 3, 94c; i-in., 7£c per lb.; 5-16, 
$4.80 ; 5-16 exact, $5.25 ; |, $4.25 ; 7-16, 
$4.05; 4, $3.85; 9-16, $3.75; |, $3.55; 
\, $3.50; I, $3.45; 1-in., $3.45. In car- 
load lots an allowance of 10c is made. 

SHEET ZINC— There is but little 
doing. We still quote $5.75 to $6.25. 

ANTIMONY. — A slight improvement, 
but still quiet. The price is 10c 

ZINC SPELTER.— There is very little 
demand. The price is 5c 

SOLDER.— A steady demand keeps up 
and prices are well maintained. We 
quote : Bar solder, 18c; wire solder, 20c 

UWB^T" PAINTS AND OILS. 

Turpentine on the primary markets is 
as strong as ever, but there is nothing' 
new to report. Linseed oil has also as- 
sumed a stronger position, both for pre- 
sent and future deliveries. Local prices 
on both turpentine and linseed oil re- 
main unchanged. Paris green continues 
to be booked in good quantities at cur- 
rent prices, for delivery during the sea- 
son. Business in mixed paints, white 
lead and painters' materials, generally, 
is very good for this time of the year, 
and it is noticeable that the deliveries 
called for are heavier than is usual. Wc 
quote as follows : 



WHITE LEAD.— Best brands, Govern- 
ment standard, $5,874; No. 1, $5.50 ; No. 
2 $5,124 ; No. 3, $4.75; No. 4, $4.37* 
all f.o.b. Montreal. Terms, 3 per cent, 
cash or four months. 

DRY WHITE LEAD-$5.25 in casks ; 
kegs, $5.50. 

DRY WHITE ZINC — Pure dry, 6£c. ; 
No. 1, 5£c. ; in oil, pure, 7£c ; No. 1, 
6£c ; No. 2, 5£c. 

PUTTY — We quote : Bulk, in bbls., 
$1.90 per 100 lb. ; bulk, in less quantity, 
$2.05 ; bladders, in bbls., $2.25 ; blad- 
ders, in 100 or 200 lb. kegs or boxes, 
$2.40 ; in tins, $2.55 to $2.65 ; in less 
than 100-tb. lots, $3 f.o.b. Montreal, 
Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph. Maritime Provinces, 10c. high- 
er, f.o.b. St. John and Halifax. 

ORANGE MINERAL-Casks, 7c ; 100 
lb. kegs, 74;C ; smaller quantities, 8£c. 

RED LEAD — Genuine red lead in 
casks, $4.50 ; in 100-lb. kegs, $4.75 ; less 
quantities, $5.75 per 100 It). No. 1 red 
lead, casks, $4.25 ; kegs, $4.50, and 
smaller quantities, $5.50. 

LITHARGE — Ground, casks, 5c ; less, 
5^c ; flake litharge, casks, $5.25 ; smalls, 
$5.75 per 100 lb. 

LINSEED OIL— Raw, 75c; boiled, 78c 
in 5 to 9 bbls., lc less, 10 to 20 bbl. 
lots open, net cash, plus 2c. for four 
months. Delivered anywhere in Ontario 
between Montreal and Oshawa at 2c per 
gal. advance and freight allowed. 

TURPENTINE.— Single bbls., 67c ; 2 
to 4 bbls., 66c ; 5 bbls. and over, open 
terms. 

SHELLAC VARNISH — Pure white. 
$2.35 to $2.45 ; orange, $2.25 to $2.35. 

MIXED PAINTS— $1.20 to $1.45 per 
gal. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



23 



CASTOR 01L-8f to 9ic. in wholesale 
lots, and ^c additional for small lots. 

SEAL OIL-47* to 49c. 

COD OIL— 32^ to 35c. 

PARIS GREEN — Petroleum barrels, 
16Jc. per tb.; arsenic kegs, 17c; 50 anil 
100-lb. drums, 17^c; 25-Ib. drums, 18c. ; 
l-lt>. packages, 18£c; -J -lb. packages, 
8Hc.; 1-tb. tins, 19£c; £-lb. tins, 2Hc. 
f.o.b. Montreal. Terms : 3 per cent. 30 
days, or four months from date of 
delivery. 

SCRAP METALS. 

There is a fairly good demand this 
week, and prices on several lines are be- 
coming firm. Iron, both wrought and 
machinery scrap is very scarce, espe- 
cially the latter, and dealers are expect- 
ing an advance in the near future. We 
quote : Heavy copper and wire, 10 to 
lO^c. per tb.; light copper, 9c; heavy red 
brass, 9c; heavy yellow, 9c; light brass, 
4c; lead, 2f to 2|c; zinc, 2 to 2£c; iron, 
No. 1 wrought, $14 ; machinery scrap, 
|14 ; stove plate, $8 to §9 ; light iron, 
No. 2, $5 per ton ; malleable and steel, 
S4 ; rags, country, 60 to 70c. per 100 lb.; 
old rubbers, 6 to 6-Jc. per lb. 

GLASS. 

There is nothing new to report in 
L'las^. Orders for import are coming in 
well, and prices remain firm. Our quo 
tations are as follows : •* First break, 
50 feet, $2.10 ; second, $2.20 for 50 
feet ; first break, 100 feet, $4 ; second 
break, $4.20 ; third break, $4.70, and 
fourth break, $4.95. 

WOES. 

There is very little doing. We quote : 
No. I hides, 7ic; No. 2, 6£c; No. 3, 

~i!a-. Sheepskins, 65c 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, January 31, 1902. 
HARDWARE. 

WHILE for in the way of immediate 
shipment the wholesale hardware 
trade is at present not active, a 
good many orders are being booked for 
future delivery, and the outlook for spring 
trade is assuring. Milk can trimmings are 
going forward quite briskly. Sap buckets 
are now beginning to be shipped, for which 
about the usual complement of orders have 
been booked. Business in tinware and 
enamelled ware shows some signs of im- 
provement as far as the demand is con- 
cerned. There have not been many 
changes in prices. The only one worthy of 
note is in copper rivets and burrs, in which 
a sharp decline has taken place. 

Barb Wire— A number of orders have 
been booked during the week for future 
shipment, but from stock very little is being 
done. We quote as follows : F.o.b. 
Cleveland, $2.77 y£ for less than carlots, 
and #2.65 for carlots. From stock 
Toronto, $3. 

Galvanized Wire — The conditions 
are much the same as in regard to barb 
wire, the demand from stock being light 
and for future shipment good. We quote : 
Nos. 6, 7 and 8, JS3.50 to S3. 85 per 100 



lb., according to quantity ; No. 9, $2.85 to 
$3.15 ; No. 10, $3. 60 to #3-95 ; No. 11, 
$3. 70 to $4. 10 ; No. 12, S3 to S3-3° '. 
No. 13, S3- 10 to S3 40; No. 14, S4-ioto 
S4.50; No. 15, S4-6o to S5-5° ; No. 16, 
S4.85 to 55.35. Nos. 6 to 9 base f.o.b. 
Cleveland are quoted at $2.$2'A in less 
than carlots and 12c. less for carlots oi 15 
tons. 

Smooth Steel Wire — A few orders for 
future delivery are being booked in oiled and 
annealed wire. Nothing is being done in 
hay-baling wire. Base price, S 2 -6o per 100 
lb. Oiling ioc. ; coppering, 60c, and tin- 
ning, $2 per 100 lb. extra. Delivery 
points, Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Montreal, with freights equalized on those 
points. 

Wire Nails — Some orders are being 
booked for future account, but very little is 
being done from stock, which is, of course, 
to be expected after the heavy buying there 
was before the recent adjustment of prices. 
Both here and in the United States prices 
are firm. The nail manufacturers in the 
latter country hold a meeting on February 1 
for the purpose of perfecting the agreement 
entered into at a meeting held in Pittsburg 
some time ago. We quote $2. 55 for less 
than carlots, and $2. 50 for carlots. Delivery 
points, Toronto, Hamilton, London, 
Gananoque and Montreal. 

Cut Nails — A few small nails are going 
out, but trade is, on the whole, limited. 
We quote base price $2.35 per keg, with 
7^c. allowance on carlots. 

Horse Nails — Not much doing. 
Discounts are as follows: "C " brand, 
oval head, 50 and 7% per cent., and 
on "M" and other brands, 50, 10 and 
S per cent. Countersunk head 60 per cent. 
All the manufacturers are now understood 
to be selling off the same list. 

Horseshoes— Business is of an average 
character for this time of the year. We quote 
f.o.b. Toronto as follows: Iron shoes, No. 2 
and larger, light, medium and heavy, 
S3. 60 ; snow shoes, $3.85 ; light steel 
shoes, $3.70; featherweight (all sizes), 
S4.95; iron shoes, No. 1 and smaller, light, 
medium and heavy (all sizes), S3.85 ; snow 
shoes, S4 ; light steel shoes, S3-95; feather- 
weight (all sizes), S4-95- 

Screws — A fairly good business is being 
done. Discounts are as follows : Flat head 
bright, 87^ and 10 per cent.; round 
head bright, 82^ and 10 per cent. ; flat 
head brass, 80 and 10 per cent. ; round 
head brass, 75 and 10 per cent.; round 
head bronze, 65 per cent., and flat head 
bronze 70 per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs— The price of copper 
rivets, with the usual proportion of copper 
burrs, are quoted at 45 and 10 per cent., a 




For either new or old Buildings 

OUR 

Metallic Cornices 

can't be equalled for practical 
service and artistic beauty. 

They are light in weight, easily handled 
and economical in cost — giving 1 fire-proof 
protection as well as a handsome effect. 

Almost countless stock designs— or an) 
particular size, shape or pattern to order. 
Write for full details. 

METALLIC ROOFING CO.,limited 

Wholesale Mfrs. 
TORONTO, CANADA. 



reduction of 20 per cent. Copper rivets 
alone are 30 and 10 per cent. Trade is 
good in iron rivets and burrs. Small cold 
punched rivets are in active request and 
very strong in price. We quote : Iron 
rivets, 60 and 10 percent.; iron burrs, 55 
per cent. ; copper rivets, with usual propor- 
tion of burrs, 45 and 10 per cent.; copper 
burrs alone, 30 and 10 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — A good demand is 
still reported. We quote as follows : Car- 
riage bolts, common (Si list), 55 and 5 
per cent.; carriage bolts, full square (S2.40 
list), 60 and 5 per cent.; carriage bolts, 
Norway iron (S3 list), 60 and 5 per cent. ; 
machine bolts, all sizes, 55 and 5 per cent.; 
coach screws, 70 per cent. 

Rope — Trade is quiet, owing to the high 
prices ruling. Most of the retailers appear 
to have placed their orders for future de- 
livery when prices were about 3c. per lb. 
lower than they are at present. We quote : 
Pure manila, 16c; British manila, I3^c; 
sisal, 12c. 

Cutlery — Business in cutlery is occupy- 
ing but little attention. 

Sporting Goods — Some orders are being 
booked for spring delivery, but very little 
is being done outside that. 

Dairy Supplies — The demand for milk 
can trimmings continues good, and ship- 
ments are going forward freely. Discount 
25 per cent. 

Tinware — Business shows some improve- 
ment and an improvement from this out is 
looked for. Discount 40 per cent. 

Sap Buckets — About the usual number 
of orders have been placed and shipments 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



are beginning to go forward pretty freely. 
Discount 40 and 10 per cent. 

Enamelled Ware — Business is recover- 
ing somewhat from its recent quietude. 

Screen Doors and Windows — Trade 
on future account is brisk. Common doors, 
2 or 3 panel, are quoted f.o.b. factory 
points as follows : Walnut, stained, 3 -in. 
style, $6.80 per dozen ; stained, yellow, 
$7; natural color, oil finish, $8.15; 4-in. 
style, 20c. extra per dozen. Windows : 
No. o, $1.60; No. 1, $1 70; No. 2, #1.95; 
No. 3, #2.10 ; No. 4 #2.50 per dozen. 

Harvest Tools — A few orders are 
still being booked for future delivery. 
Discount 70 per cent. 

Spades and Shovels — Some orders are 
being booked for spring delivery, but not a 
great deal is being done. Discount 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Green Wire Cloth — A fair business is 
being done for summer delivery. We 
quote 21.25 per 100 square feet. 

Cement — Trade in cement is recovering 
from the depression usually felt in January, 
and a number of orders are now confidently 
ecpected. We quote : Canadian Port- 
land, Rathbun's "Star," #2.25 to $2.65; 
"Beaver," 5210 to $2.50; "Ensign," 
$1. 90 to $2.30; German, $3. 15; English, $3; 
Belgian, J2.50 to $2.75; Canadian hydrau- 
lic, $1.25 to $1.50 per bbl. 

METALS. 

In steel and iron the market continues 
firm, and quite a strong feeling has developed 
in regard to tinplates and Canada plates. 
Tin is weak, but copper is excited and 
firmer. 

Pig Iron — The market rules firm. This 
is particularly true of the market in the 
United States, where, according to The Iron 
Trade Review of January 30, consumers 
are already covering requirements for the 
third quarter of the year. The idea as to 
price on track Toronto is still $17.50 to #18 
for No. 2 foundry. 

Bar Iron — The tone of the market is 
gathering strength, although no change has 
taken place in quotations. In the United 
States last week, however, the price was 
advanced $2 per ton. Base price $1.95 to 
#2.05. Extras cut to length while rolling : 
2 ft. and over, 10c. per 100 lb.; 1 ft. and 
under 2 ft., 15c. ; under 1 ft., 20c. ; over 
20 ft. by special agreement, according to 
length and size. 

Steel — The market is decidedly firm for 
practically all kinds of steel, and importers 
report that they cannot get prompt delivery 
from the manufacturers either in the 
United States or in Great Britain. We 
quote as follows : Merchantable cast 
steel, 9 to 15c. per lb.; drill steel, 8 
to loc. per lb.; "BC" and "Black 
Diamond " tool steel, 10 to lie; Jessop's, 



Morton's and Firth's tool steel, 14c; 
toe calk steel, $2.85 to $3 ; tire steel, $2- 30 
to $2.50 ; sleighshoe steel, $2.10 to $2.25; 
reeled machinery steel, S3, hoop steel, 
S3. 10. 

Black Sheets — The demand is fair 
for this time of the year. We quote : 
Common, S3. 15 for 28 gauge; and dead 
flat, $2. 50 for 26 gauge. 

Canada Plates — Business is quiet from 
stock, but orders are being booked freely 
for forward shipment. We quote as fol- 
lows : All dull, S3 00 ; half polished, 
S3- 10 ; all bright, S3. 75. 

Galvanized Sheets — The demand is 
good both for shipment from stock and on 
future account. We quote : " Queen's 
Head" brand at $4.50 in case lots, and 
$4 65 in less quantities. 

Tin — The market is again easier. In 
Lndon on Wednesday the market closed 
12=. 6d. lower on spot and 5s. lower on 
futures, and New York has declined of 
sympathy, although an improvement in the 
latter market is looked for. Locally there is 
a fair business doing in small lots, for which 
$28 to S-9 per 100 lb. is the ruling price. 

Tinplates — Prices are stiffening in the 
British markets. This has stimulated the 
demand here, although no change has been 
made in quotations. We quote I C, usual 
sizes, at S4 per box. 

Tinned Sheets — The demand has 
improved materially, and there is a good 
business being done. We quote as follows: 
72x30, up to 24 gauge, 7j£c. ; ditto, 
up to 26 gauge, 8c. 

Terne Plates — Quiet. We still quote : 
I C, 20 x 28 gauge, at S8 50. 

Copper — A reaction has set in and the 
outside markets are excited and rapidly 
advancing. On Wednesday, in London, 
spot copper closed £1 7s. 6d. higher and 
futures £1 1 os. higher. Locally there has 
been a heavy demand during the past week 
and quotations are $1 higher for ingot, now 
being S'5 per 100 lb. 

Brass — Business is quiet and discount on 
rod and sheet is 15 per cent. 

Solder — A fair trade is being done. 
We quote : Half-and-half, guaranteed, 19c; 
do. commercial, i8j£c. ; refined, 18c. ; 
wiping, I7#c. 

Lead — There is a light demand for small 
lots. The outside markets are steady to 
strong. We quote : S3- 5° to S3 -75 for pig 
lead and $5 for bar. 

Iron Pipe — Trade keeps fair, with the 
tone of the market in regard to prices firm. 
We quote : Black pipe, $5.40 for i-inch. ; 
galvanized, $7-95 for i-inch. 

Zinc Spelter— This is moving in small 
quantities at $5- 50 to $6 per 100 lb. 

Zinc Sheet — The demand is fairly good. 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pie- 

paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 

6d. and is. Canisters. 



WELLINGTON' 



KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England, 

Agent: 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL, 



COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y. 

1 Steel Carriage and 

Wagon Jacks, 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BV JOBBERS AT MFRS. PRICES. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

* &**" S3 <ri^ Large* Variety, 

nP* x S^~>r/l Toilet, LUnd. Electric PowerJ 

" V ARE THE BEST. 

Higheat Quality Grooming and 
Sbeep-She&rirjg Machine*. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

BIND FOB OATALOOFI TO 
i««liu gkau-w Mfg. Co., Kuku, H.H..C8A 




V 



Oon't Forget the Name. . . 

NEWMANS INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINGS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 
Will close a dooragainst any pressure of wind. Far 
ahead of ordinary door springs pneumatic or othei- 
wise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



Oneida Community Goods ft 

ONT.I 



HALTERS, COW TIES, SNAPS, etc., etc 

in all sizes and styles. May be had of all 
Jobbers throughout Canada. 

Factory— NIAGARA FALLS, 



Mackenzie Bros. 

HARDWARE 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS, 

Travellers covering Manitoba, ! WINNIPEG 
Northwest Territories and 
British Columbia. . MAN. 

Correspondence Solicited. 



" 1=3 UL.L. IN/IAN " 

TROUSER or SKIRT BANGERS. 

TWO ^», SIZES 




PULLMAN SASH BALANCE CO., 
ROCHESTER, N.Y., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 



We quote $6 to $6.25 in casks and $6 25 
to $6. 50 in part casks. 

Antimony — The demand has been active 
during the past week at 10c. per lb. 
PAINTS AND OILS. 

The paris green market is somewhat 
weaker this week, some green of United 
States manufacture being quoted at lower 
figures than the Canadian product. Lead 
for future delivery continues active. Raw 
and boiled linseed oil are also active, and 
the price is firm. Turpentine is quiet, but 
the previous advance has been sustained. 
Dry colors are quiet. Prices rule about the 
same. We quote : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $5.87^; No. 1, $5.50; No. 2. $5. 12^ ; 
No. 3, $4-75 : No 4. $4-37 '4 in pkgs. 
0(25 lb. and upwards ; yic. per lb. extra 
will be charged for 12^-lb. pkgs. ; genuine 
dry white lead in casks, 85.12^. 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb. 
$5.12^; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $5.50; No. 
1, in casks of 560 lb., $4 ; ditto, kegs of 
100 lb., $4.50. 

Litharge — Genuine, 6 to 6#c. 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 7^ to 8c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $6 to $6. 25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Benzine — In barrel lots, i6#c. per gal.; 
less quantities, 25c. per gal. 

Paris White — 90c. to $1 per 100 lb. 

Whiting — 65c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 35c; in less 
than cases, 40c. per lb. 

Liquid Shellac — Pure orange, in bbls., 
$2 25 to $2.35 ; white, $2.35 to $2.45 per 
gal.; in less quantities, 10:. extra. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., $2. 25; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, 52.40; bulk in bbls., 
$1.90 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 
lb., $2. 05 ; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., $2.90. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, $1.90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, £2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, $1 .20 to $1.30 per 
gal. 

Castor Oil — English, in cases, 9% to 
ioc. per lb. and 10 to io^c. for single tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 77c; 
boiled, 80c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 76c; 
boiled, 79c, delivered. To Toronto, 
Hamilton and London, 2c. less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 68c. ; 2 
^jto 4 barrels, 67c, delivered. Toronto, 
Hamilton and London ic. less. For less 
quantities than barrels, 5c. per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5 -gallon packages, 
50c., and 10-gallon packages, 80c. will be 
charged. 

GLASS. 

The retail trade is steady, while jobbers 
are booking a number of stock orders for 
delivery later on in the year. We quote as 
follows : Under 26 in., #4. 25 ; 26 to 
40 in., JS4.65; 41 to 50 in., $5.10 ; 51 to 
60 in., 55.35 ; 61 to 70 in., 55.75; 



^fl&Kf*" 



¥ Nicholson File Co. 

PROVIDENCE, R.I., U.S.A. 

CAST STEEL FILES and RASPS HIGH GRADE 

(FOR HOME AND EXPORT TRADE) 

LARGEST FILE MANUFACTURERS IN THE WORLD. 

SEVEN DISTINCT FACTORIES. 

The well-known Nicholson and X.F. Brands are made exclusively at our Providence 
works from best selected steel and by experienced workmen, and are exported to all 
parts of the globe and command the highest price. 

The following prominent wholesale hardware merchants in Canada carry a stock of Nicholson Brand 
Files for the benefit of the retail trade : 



H. H. Fuller & Co., Halifax, N.S. 

W. H. Thorne & Co., 8t. John, N.B. 

A. Macpherson <fe Son, Montreal, P.Q. 

H. S. Howland, Sods & Co., Toronto, Ont. 

Wood, Vallance & Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Hobbs Hardware Co., London, Ont. 

J. H. Ashdown Hardware Co , Winnipeg, MaD. 

Geo. D. Wood & Co.. Winnipeg, Man. 

Thos. Dorm & Co., Vanco ver, B.C. 

McLennan, McFeely & Co., Vancouver, B.C. 

E. G". Prior & Co., Victoria, B.C. 

Hickman Tye Hardware Co., Victoria, B.C. 



WALTER GROSE 

MONTREAL 

CANADIAN SELLING AGENT. 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 



Manufacturers of 



Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs, 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 

INGERSOLL, ONT. 




GLASS- 



Art Leaded Glass, 
Plate and Window Glass 
Prismatic Glass. 

All Glass required for building. 
Catalogue and Prices on Application. 

THE WOOD ART GLASS CO., London, Ont. 



71 to 80, $6.25 ; 81 to 85, $7 ; 86 to 90, 
$7 75 '< Toronto, Hamilton and London. 
Terms, 4 months, or 3 per cent. 30 days. 

OLD MATERIAL. 

The copper market is firmer in the 
United States and it has a corresponding 
effect in the steadying of the prices for old 
material. We note no further changes this 
week. We quote as follows : Agricul- 
tural, 60c. per cwt. ; machinery cast, 
60c. ; heavy copper, ioc. per lb. ; stove 
cast, 40c. ; No. 1 wrought, 50c. per 
100 lb. ; new light scrap copper, 7c. 
per lb.; bottoms, 7}4c, coil wire, ioc; 
light brass, 5c; heavy yellow brass, 
7^c. ; heavy red brass, 8c. ; scrap 
lead, 2)£c. ; zinc, 2c. ; scrap rubber, 
6c. ; good country mixed rags, 50 to 
60c; clean dry bones, 40 to 45c. per 
100 lb. 

PETROLEUM. 

Prices are steady, with a good movement 
from stock. We quote: Pratt's Astral, i6# 
to 17c. in bulk (barrels, extra) ; American 
water white, 17 to i7#c. in barrels ; 



Photogene, \6%, to 17c. ; Sarnia water 
white, 16 to i6#c. in barrels; Sarnia prime 
white, 14^ to 15c. in barrels. 

COAL. 

The stock of bituminous coal on hand is 
very light, as is also the stock of nut coal. 
Prices for the latter have locally advanced 
25c. per ton, but the prices remain firm 
and unchanged for importation. We 
quote at international bridges : Grate, 
$4.75 per gross ton; egg, stove and nut, $5 
per gross ton ; soft coal, $2.50 to 83.25 in 
bond, according to grade. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Ingot copper is quoted $1 per 100 lb. 
higher. 

Copper rivets and burrs are 20 per cent, 
lower. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. W. S. Leslie, of A. C. Leslie & Co., 
Montreal, was in Toronto on Thursday in 
the interests of his firm. 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BANQUET AT HAMILTON. 

Australian Trade Discussed. 

ABOUT 100- guests attended the 
monthly banquet of The Can- 
adian Manufacturers' Association 
at the Hotel Royal, Hamilton, on Janu- 
ary 24, the first banquet this association 
ever held out of Toronto. At the head 
of the table was E. A. Brice, the first 
% ice-president of the association ; at his 
right hand being the Hon. Dr. Montague, 
one of the principal guests of the even- 



I 




No. 893. -The Watson, Foster Co., Limited. 

The most successful number of its character in 
the 1902 line. The stripe— shaded off the ground 
—gives a depth to the design. Especially on rich 
colored grounds it is handsome in the extreme. 

ing. W. K. George, . vice-president for 
Ontario ; . J. P. Murray, chairman of the 
reception committee ; W. P. Bull, Fred- 
ric Nicholls, Geo. H. Hees, and P. W. 
Kllis, all of Toronto ; H. S. Brennen 
and Mayor Hendrie, of Hamilton ; John 
Bertram, of Dundas ; John Baillie, of 
Montreal ; E. F. Tillson, W. A. Dowler, 
and W. D. Robinson, Tilsonburg ; J. W. 
Taylor, Johannesburg, South Africa ; E. 
T. Lower, Stamford, Conn.: Harry Sites, 
Woodstock ; J. B. Henderson, Paris, and 
0. R. H. Warnock, Gait. 

After the dinner was disposed of, Mayor 
Hendrie, in a neat speech, welcomed the 
visiting manufacturers to Hamilton. He 
then gave place to the Hon. Dr. Mon- 
tague, the principal speaker of the even- 



ing, who took for his theme " The op- 
portunities for Canadian Trade in Aus- 
tralia." Dr. Montague said he saw no 
reason why there could not be made in 
this Dominion the $40,000,000 worth of 
goods we now annually import from the 
United States, and give employment to 
many heads of families who now had to 
go elsewhere in quest of a living. He 
claimed that the Dominion should have a 
proper share of the Empire's trade. He 
dwelt on the reception accorded him in 




No. n82.— The Watson, Foster Co., Limited. 

A fleur-de-lis pattern of striking effect, on rich 
grounds of French maroon, green or blue, with 
gilt figure. It is a correct and effective decora- 
tion for halls, churches, lodge rooms, etc. Dealers 
should note this design and sample it at once. 

Australia, and declared, that without a 
doubt, Canada and the Canadians held 
a warm place in the hearts of the Aus- 
tralasians. The growth of Australia had 
been marvellous, its shipping tonnage 
now being 21,000,000, and the total 
value of its imports and exports equal- 
ling $383,000,000. Canada, he declared. 
might share in that trade if it was gone 
about in the right way. He recom- 
mended the establishment of a better 
steamship service between this country 
and that colony ; the establishment of 
warehouses for Dominion productions in 
Australia, the sending of eight or ten 
business men to work up trade, and the 
publication of a journal describing Can- 
ada's varied industries. ' 



THE 

PAINTERS 
PERFECT 
WHITE 
LEAD 

is beautifully soft and fine in 
the grain. It mixes well with 
LinseedOil, forming a creamy 
smooth paint of great cover- 
ing power and undoubted 
durability. Every atom is 
paint — perfect paint — and 
there is no loss or residue 
of any kind. The Painters 
Perfect White Lead has be- 
come very popular every- 
where. Book early to en- 
sure early shipment. 



THE 



CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY 



LIMITED 



Montreal and Toronto. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



'27 



WATJ0NF05TERC0. 



\|<>\ "I'RK.M. 



NVA1.I.-PAPKR* 



WE ANTICIPATE 

A 

LARGER REPEATING BUSINESS 
THAN USUAL THIS SPRING. 

AS YET OUR STOCK IS VERY COMPLETE. ORDERS, 
LARGE OR SMALL, RECEIVE SAME ATTENTION AND 
ARE PROMPTLY SHIPPED. 

BUT MANY OF OUR BEST COLORINGS WILL SOON 
BE OUT OF PRINT, WE ASK DEALERS, THERE- 
FORE, TO ANTICIPATE THE SHORT END OF THEIR 
STOCKS AT AN EARLY DATE. 

SAMPLE BO OKS-ANY GRADE, 

AND INGRAINS, SENT ON APPLICATION 

PRE-PAID 



FEB. I903 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING 



AND 



PLUMBING 



BANQUET OF THE HAMILTON 
PLUMBERS. 

THE first annual banquet of the Hamil- 
ton Master Plumbers' Association was 
held at the Waldorf.on the evening of 
January 27, and proved to be a thoroughly 
enjoyable affair. It was presided over by 
the president, A. Rogers, and the 40 guests 
and members present did ample justice to 
the good things provided for their consump- 
tion. 

Not the least interesting feature of the 
euening's proceedings was the presentation 
of a handsome ring, suitably engraved, 
to W. D. Smith, by W. J. Walsh, the re- 
tiring president, on behalf of his fellow- 
members as a mark of their appreciation 
for Mr. Smith's valuable services on behalf 
of the Association. 

The toast of the "Hamilton City Corpora- 
tion ' ' was responded to in an appropriate 
way by Aids. Hugh S. Wallace and Wm. H. 
Findlay. 

Besides the pleasing music provided by 
an efficient orchestra, a number of songs 
were given by such popular men as Andrew 
Mann, Chas. E. Marks, Aid. Findlay, 
Aid. Wallace, H. W. Anthes and W. L. 
Helliwell. 

Amongst the guests present we notice the 
following from Toronto : W. H. Meredith, 
Wm. Mansell, F. W. Armstrong, Samuel 
Topping, Robert S. Sumerville, Charles E. 
Marks, A. W. Mann, J. H. Patterson, H. 
W. Anthes and W. L. Helliwell. 



NEW CHURCH SCHOOLHOUSE. 

On a site immediately south of the main 
church, a new Sunday-school will be erected 
by the members of Grace Church, Ottawa. 
The hall is to have a frontage of 30 feet on 
Elgin street and will extend back 60 feet, 
the whole to be built of brick at a cost of 
$3,000. It will conform with the design of 
the church in point of architecture. Tenders 
will be called for without delay so that work 
can be commenced on the building early in 
the spring. 



BUILDING PERMITS IN TORONTO. 

This week fewer building permits than 
usual were issued in Toronto. The cold 
weather is probably accountable for this. 
As it is the building operations are far 
behind the requirements of the rapidly- 
growing city of Toronto. The following 
permits have been granted from the city 
commissioner's office : Rev. W. E. Has- 



sard, for the erection of a small addition to 
the schoolroom of the Crawford street 
Methodist church, to cost about $240 ; Thos. 
Oliver, for alterations of brick and plaster 
to his dwelling on 424 Wilton avenue, to 
cost $600 ; S. F. Aberdeen, for the erection 
of a two storey and attic brick dwelling on 
330 Gladstone avenue, to cost $ 1,600 ; 
J. Jeffrey, for the erection of a two storey 
dwelling with a brick front and roughcast 
sides and back on Albany avenue, to cost 
$1,000 ; J. MacDonald, for alterations and 
new fronts and partitions to stores on 1 1 84- 
1 188 Queen street west, to cost $900 ; 
Gough Bros., for alterations of wood and 
iron to their store on 6 and 8 Queen street 
west, to cost $1,500 ; Jos. Wilby, for the 
erection of a pair of two-storey brick and 
roughcast semi detached dwellings at 65 
and 67 Woodbine avenue, to cost $2,000, 
and John McKenzie, for a two-storey brick 
stable at 389 Berkeley street, to cost $200. 



SOME BUILDING NOTES. 

A new church is being built atClanbrassil, 
Ont. 

J. B. Jackson's cold-storage warehouse 
at Simcoe, Ont., is about completed. 

Silverton & Wilson are erecting a com- 
modious store and dwelling at Inwood, Ont. 

Tenders are being received at Lebanon, 
Ont., for the erection of a new brick school- 
house. 

Plans are being prepared for the erection 
of a large hotel at North Sydney, C.B., 
next summer. 

Mayor Matthews has awarded the con- 
tract for his new residence at Fort William, 
Ont. 

It is rumoured that the Dominion Coal 
Co. is going to erect a plant at Quebec, 
costing $75,000. 

A new stove foundry, 50 x 120 feet, is 
being erected at St. John, N.B., by Ex- 
Ald. John E. Wilson. 

A new cheese factory is to be built in the 
spring, near Fordwich, Ont., and already 
most of the brick has been hauled to the 
spot. 

Amherst, N.S., has passed by-laws en- 
abling the town council to borrow $10,000 
to erect and equip suitable buildings for the 
Maritime winter fair. 

A new two -storey brick separate school 
of eight rooms is to be commenced early in 
the spring at Port Arthur, Ont. The 
structure will cost about $10,000. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING " 
CONTRACTS. 

Purdy, Mansell & Co., plumbers and 
steamfitters, Toronto, have secured the 
contract for the plumbing and hot.water 
heating of a house on Glen Road, Toronto, 
forC. A. Dinnick ; also the plumbing and 
heating of two houses on Madison avenue 
for the same party, and the automatic fire- 
protection contract for the Massey Harris 
Co., Limited, Toronto. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

A. Hall & Son, plumbers, Coaticook, 
Que. , have registered. 



A PRAISEWORTHY IDEA. 

With that thoughtfulness for the comfort 
of their men, for which The Sherwin Wil- 
liams Co. are famous, they have gone to 
some trouble to provide a lunch room in the 
Montreal factory where the men can enjoy 
their mid-day meal away from the smell of 
the paint. Heretofore, they have been eat- 
ing a cold lunch in their workrooms, and 
everyone who has been in a paint factory 
knows the discomfort which must attend in 
that case. 

The new room is bright and clean ; tables 
and dishes are provided, and the men are 
given coffee or tea and milk without charge. 
A library, containing books, illustrated 
papers, etc., is connected with it ; cards, 
checkers and other games are also provided, 
so that the men can pass the noon- hour very 
pleasantly. 

This is not a new thing with the company. 
In their Cleveland factory large rooms are 
provided for this purpose and a good lunch 
given to the employes. It is a laudable 
idea, and The Sherwin-Williams Co. are 
deserving of much credit. 



You may be looking for 
a Good 

Pipe Hanger. 

Ask us about 

«.e"Grabler." 

We send you booklet illustrating 
the different kinds. 

The James Morrison Brass Mfg. Go. 




TORONTO. 



Limited. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 



PAINT SURPRISE 



\\/ HEN you get a paint that is made for painting as it 
should be made, your paint business will surprise you. 
RAMSAYS PAINTS are made for painting, the right kind of 
painting, and if you take hold your paint business will be a 
surprise in the right direction. If you are handling cheap 
paints or paints without a reputation, it will surprise you to see 
the trade going away. RAMSAYS PAINTS have a reputation 
to keep your trade and gain as well. RAMSAYS PAINTS 
have attractive labels, showing color, number and name on 
each tin. We assist you with booklets, color cards, show cards, 

fence signs and everything 
necessary to push a paint 
business as it should be 
pushed to success for you 
and for us. The price 
is just right and our 
travellers want to talk the 
matter over with YOU. 




A. RAMSAY & SON 

The Paint Makers, 

MONTREAL. 

Established 1842. 



BUTLER'S 



FAMOUS 



Sheffield Cutlery. 



Fish and Dessert Knives ; Spoons and Forks j 
Cabinets and Cases of Cutlery and Plate. 



"ftlTTI ED" was registered a; 
DU 1 LEA Trade Mark, A.D 



as a 
1768. 



Sole Makers of the celebrated 

"KEEN" Razors, "CAVENDISH" 

brand of Table Knives and Carvers. 



HIGHEST AWARDS. 



SPECIAL MENTION. 



—Full Line of Samples and stock at— 

George Butler & Co.'s 

kKoom. 62 HOLBORN VIADUCT, E.C. 

(Over Snow Hill Station.) 
MANUFACTORY: 

Trinity Works, SHEFFIELD, ENG. 



Canada Foundry Company 



LI MI TED 



Architectural Iron 



[ BEAMS, COLUMNS, 
J CASTINGS, 
[ FIRE ESCAPES 



/ PIPKS 

Waterworks Supplies *g™£« 



PIPES, 
SPECIi 
HYDRANTS, VALVES. 



_ . , rt , . ( BRAKE SHOES, 

Railway Supplies { j--^ 

_ II r GRILLS, 

Ornamental Iron ™<?* 

____ __^^_^_^____^^_ [ RAILINGS. 

General Jobbing 



HEAD OFFICE : 

TORONTO, ONT. 

District Offices : 

Montreal, Que., Halifax, N. S., Winnipeg, Man., 

Vancouver, B. C, Rossland, B. C. 



"THE BEST PAINTS" 

Beaver Pure | pREPAR[D 
T.L&C.Co.Pure) PAINTS 

FOR OUTSIDE AND INSIDE USE. 



They are made from the purest pigments, ground 
in Refined Linseed Oil, and are unsurpassed for 
Beauty, Durability and Covering. 

By their uniformity of shade, and trueness to 
color represented on our color cards, they have 
become renowned. Made in 48 most artistic shades. 

EVERY TIN GUARANTEED. 

Catalogue and Price Lists, with Color Cards, 
supplied upon application. 



The TORONTO LEAD & COLOR CO., limited 

Leslie St., TORONTO. 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



GOOD HARDWARE AND PLUMBING BUSI- 
ness in Eastern part of Toronto. Apply Box 77, 
Hardware and Metal, Toronto. - - (5) 




THE GLORIA LIGHT 



Send for Price List of Incan- 
descent Gas Supplies. 

Try our Gloria Triple Weave Mantle 
— the strongest and most brilliant. 



The United Incandescent Light Co,, 

7 Vonge St. Arcade, TORONTO. 

Phone Main 969. 



r 



ALL 
TOOLS 



- ARE — 



•. • 



STEVENS 

- AF 

STANDARD FOR QUALITY 

Your stock is not complete without a full line of our Rifles, Shotguns, Pistols, Tools 
and Victor Bioycles. 

Handled by the Leading Jobbers. 

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p 2l ^ ox Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. 



The Parcell Drop 
Lever Truck Scales 

Highly endorsed by Government 
Inspectors. 

Designed for Farm, Mill, Factory and 
Warehouse uses. Ask your wholesale 
Dealer for cuts and prices, or write 



AYLMER IRON WORKS CO., 



AYLMER, ONT. 



Limited 




See I You Don't 
Have to Pull. 
A Child Can Do It. 




No.34 





AHO SEir PULLE 



No. 14 



Ho.17 



A 



NO. 16 



KEYS 



Walker's Self-Pulling Cork Screws 

Made of Crucible Steel, Nickel Plated, Polished Apple Wood Handles. 

EVERY ONE TESTED AND GUARANTEED. Several imitations on the market, but none as good. 

Mfrd. only by ERIE SPECIALTY CO., Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 

To introduce our line of Keys 
we will prepay express to any 
point in Canada on orders of 
one gross or more. This offer 
is open until March ist, 190' 



SPECIAL 

OFFEE 




If interested in Bicycle or Automobile Material, or 
Sporting Goods, drop us a postal request and we 
will mail you our latest catalogue. 



Price per gross, $1.70; per doz., 20c. 



JOHN MILLEN & SONS 



Branch; 132 Bay Street, Toronto, Ont. 



MONTREAL, CANADA 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



31 



\\7"E have 
the nic- 
est set of Hose 
samples ever 
shown to the 
Canadian jf> 
trade. Don't 
fail to see 
them. 



HOSE 

GARDEN 

STEAM 

SUCTION 

ETC. 

Send for samples and quotations. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



\\^ E make 
Hose of 
all kinds for all 
purposes. Our 
equipment is 
the most mod- 
ern and our 
goods are per 
fection. 



THE DURHAM RUBBER CO., limited 



[ONA^mam vil 



On*. 



, 







CANADA 
RADIATORS 



Their use means 
economy in 
both cost of 
plant and fuel. 



WRITE US FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICES. 



-VVWWVWVWVWVVVVWWWVWA\'VVWVWWV'VWVVV\V\VW\V1W 

F>OIIMTS OF" IVSERIT 

which the radiators possess over all others : 

FIRST — They are the only cast iron radiators made with perfect circulation. 
The steam and water must travel through each loop after entering before 
discharging at the return end of the radiator. 

SECOND — They are the only steam radiators in which there is any effective 
provision made for drawing off the air from the inner loops, and, there- 
fore, no air pocketing and corresponding cold ends. 

THIRD — -They are the only radiators that are adapted for use in either 
steam or hot water, and, therefore, where a change is made in the heating 
system the same radiator will answer. 

1\V***\VV\VIVVVVVV\\^^VIVVWMA^*VI\VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV\ 

The Fairbanks Company 

747-749 Craig Street, MONTREAL. 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, January 27, 1902. 

THE week presents no changes of any 
kind. Business is steady, and pre- 
parations are being made for spring 
delivery. The new prices given last week 
are generally in force. Paints, oils and 
glass are all dull, and there will not be 
much move now until spring opens. Linseed 
oil is held at the decline of last week. Re- 
ports are to hand that glass is lower in price 
in Belgium, but no changes are to be noted 
here. The implement dealers' convention, 
to be held here on February 12 and 13, 
promises to be a very interesting one, and a 
large attendance of dealers from all over the 
Province is expected. 
Price list for the week is as follows : 

Barhed wire, 100 lb S3 30 

Plain twist 3 40 

Staples 3 95 

Oiled annealed wire 10 3 85 

n 3 90 

« 3 95 

13 4 10 

14 4 25 

15 4 35 
Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy, keg 3 25 

16 and 20 3 35 

10 3 35 

8 3 45 

6 3 50 

4 365 

3 3 90 

Cutnails, 30to6ody 305 

" 20 to 40 3 10 

" 10 to 16 3 15 

8 3 20 

6 325 

4 3 35 

3 3 7° 

Horsenails, 45 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 65 

No. 2 and larger 4 4° 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 490 

No. 2 and larger 4 4° 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 4 95 

No. 2 and larger 4 70 

Bar iron, $2.70 basis. 
Swedish iron, $5.00 basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 25 

Spring steel 3 25 

Machinery steel 3 75 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 8 50 

Jessop 13 00 

Sheetiron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 3 75 

28 gauge 4 00 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . . 2 79 

18 to 22 gauge 4 75 

24 gauge 5 00 

26 gauge 5 25 

28gauge 5 50 

Genuine Russian, lb 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 75 

26 gauge 8 00 

28 gauge 8 50 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 11 00 

IX 13 00 

IXX " 1500 

Ingot tin 33 

Canada plate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 3 75 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 00 

Broken lots 7 50 

Pig lead, 100 lb 6 00 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch 50 an 10 p.c. 

" Over 2 inch 50 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger $13 00 

H l 3 50 

■% and 5-16. 13 75 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 16 50 

H T 7 00 

yi and 5-16 1750 

Solder 20 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 17 

Axes, chopping $ 7 5° t0 I2 °° 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 87 K 

Round" " 82M 

Flat ' ' brass 80 

Round " " 75 

Coach 57^ P<=- 



Bolts, carriage sop.c. 

Machine 50 p . c. 

Tire 60 p.c. 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p.c. 

Rivets, iron 50 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 35 

Bluestone, cask lots $5 5° 

Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 70 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz.. $2 50 

No. 1 1 50 

No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra 1 75 

No. 1 1 25 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion.C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c . 

C.F. pistol 5 p.c. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge black 16 50 

chilled, 12 gauge 18 00 

soft, 10 gauge 21 00 

chilled, 10 gauge 23 00 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 25 

Chilled 6 75 

Powder, F.F., keg 475 

F.F.G s 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 75 and 2% p.c. 

plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 



PETROLEUM. 

Water white American 

Prime white American 

Water white Canadian 

Prime white Canadian 



PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 
Turpentine, pure, in barrels 

Less than barrel lots 

Linseed oil, raw 

Boiled 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor 

Eldorado engine 

Atlantic red 

Renown engine 

Black oil 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 

Harness oil 

Neatsfoot oil 

Steam refined oil 

Sperm oil 

Castor oil per lb. 

Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 
united inches 

26 to 40 per 50 ft. 

41 to 50 " 100 ft. 

51 to6o " " " 

61 to 70 per 100-ft. boxes 



25 Kc. 
24c. 
22c. 

21 l Ac. 

$ 62 
67 
82 

85 
27 'A 
26 J* 
29 J4 
41 
19K 
55 to 74 
65 
& 1 00 

85 
2 00 
i\A 

2 50 
2 75 
6 00 

6 50 

7 00 



Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 2% 

kegs " 2 y A 

White lead, pure per cwt. 6 50 

No. 1 " 6 00 

Prepared paints, pure liquid colors, ac- 
cording to shade and color, per gal. $1.30 to $1 .90 



NOTES. 

Application has been made to the Legis- 
lature of Manitoba for the incorporation of 
the Winnipeg Hedge and Wire Fence Co. 
with a capital of $75,000. 

A new hardware store is being opened in 
the town of Elgin by W. J. McGuire, and 
another in Margaret by Mr. Reekie. 

Among the visitors to the city during the 
past week has been Mr. John H. Tilden, 
Hamilton, president of the Gurney Stove 
and Range Co., Winnipeg. This is Mr. 
Tilden' s annual trip and he expresses satis- 
faction at the growth and prosperity of the 
West. Mr. H. J. Clare, of Clare Bros., is 
succeeding Mr. Horace Wilson as manager 
of the company's branch at this point. It is 
expected that the business of the concern 
will be much extended during the coming 
season. 



WILL REPRESENT THE McCLARY CO. 

Mr. Douglas Macpherson, of Toronto, 
has accepted a position with the McClary 
Manufacturing Co., of London, and will 
represent that firm in Southern Ontario. 

For many years Mr. Macpherson has been 
connected with the Kemp Manufacturing 
Co., and since his return, 15 months ago, 
from service in South Africa has been 
employed as assistant manager of the Mac- 
donald Manufacturing Co. The southern 
trade will no doubt be pleased to meet this 
bright young business man. 







Common galvanized iron 




has all the faults there are; 




the worst one is its varying. 




Apollo is uniform. 




American Sheet Steel Company, New York 




Representatives for Canada 




B. & S. H. Thompson & Company 




26 St. Sulpice Street 




Montreal 





CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 



a 



j) 



MIDLAND 

BRAND 

Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands'. 



Write for Prices to Sales Agents 

Drummond, McCali & Co. 

or to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. Limited 



"The Peerless" 



is the best Bolster Spring ever 
produced. A fine line for the 
hardware trade 



Wri te Us For Price;. 

c 




James Warnock & Co. 



Gait, Ont. 



CUKHEfiT ^AHKET QUOTATIONS. 



January 31, 1902. 
These prices are for such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for largerquantitiesand 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56and281b. ingots, 1091b. 28 CO 29 00 
Tin platen. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright 
M.L.S. .equal to Bradley Perbox 

I.C., usua zes 16 75 

I.X., " 8 25 

I.X.X., " 9 75 

Famous — 

1.0 675 

I.X 8 25 

I.X.X 9 75 

It »ven & Vulture Grades— 

I.C., usual sizes 5 00 

I.X., " .... 6 CO 

.X.X " 7 00 

t.XXX., " 8 03 

D.O.,12%xl7 4 50 

D.X 5 25 

D.X.X 6 00 

Coke Plates— Bright 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.O. , usual sizes 4 SO 

I.C. .special sizes, base 4 50 

20x28 850 

OharcoalPlates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.O.,20x28, 112 sheets 8 50 

I.X.,TerneTin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates 

Cookley Grade— Per lb. 
X X.,14x56,50shee bxs) 

" 14x60, " >-.... 06% 

" 14x65, " J 

Tinned Sheets 

72 *30 no to 24 gauge 07% 

26 " 08 

Iron and Steel. 

Common Bar, per 100 lbs.... 195 2 05 

Kenned " " 2 45 

Horse Shoe Iron " 2 40 

Hoop steel, 1% to 3 in. base, 3 10 

Sleigh ShoeSteel " base 2 10 

TireSteel 2 30 2 50 

Reeled Machinery 3 00 

ToeOalkSteel 2 85 3 00 

T. Firth &Co's tool steel.per lb 12% 13 

J essop's tool Steel 14 

Morton's tool steel C 12% 13 

Black Diamond and " B.C," 

tool steel 10 11 

"<>as. Leonard's tool steel.... 08 09 

Jrill Steel, per lb 08 10 

Boiler Tabes. 

1%-iuch 12% 

" 13 

2'/, " 15 

3 " 16 

3% " 20 

4 " 25 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

14 inch 2 50 2 60 

<-l61nch 2 60 2 70 

'. inch and thioker 2 50 2 60 

Black Sheets. 

Cjm. D.Fi. 

18 gauge 2 85 3 0U 

20 gauge 2 85 3 CO 

22 to 24 " 2 95 3 25 

26 " 3 05 3 50 

28 " 3 15 



OanadaPlates. 

All dull, 52 sheets 3 00 

Halfpolished 3 10 

Ali bright 3 75 

Black pipe— Iron Pipe. 

Per 1C0 Feet. 

% inch 4 65 

% " 340 

% " 345 

% " 370 

\ " 385 

1 5 40 

1% " 7 70 

l 1 /, " 9 20 

2 " 1250 

2y, " 24 00 

3 " 28 10 

3% " 36 00 

4 " 43 CO 

4% " 5r 00 

5 " 57 00 

6 " 73 00 

G tlvanized pipe— 

% inch 5 15 

% " 5 50 

1 " 7 95 

1% " 10 80 

1% " 12 95 

2 " 17 35 

5 p. c. off to preferred buyers. 

Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 
G C. Comet. Auier. Head. 

16 gauge 

18to24gange 4 05 3 75 .... 4 05 

26 " 4 25 4 00 .... 4 25 

28 ." 4 50 4 25 .... 4 50 

Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 

28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 

Chain. 

Proof Coil, 3-16in.,perl001b 

% •' " 7 85 8 10 

5-16 " " 4 95 5 25 

% - " 4 35 4 60 

7-16 " " 4 15 4 40 

y. " " 4 f'O 4 25 

9-16 " " 3 99 4 15 

% " " 3 80 4 05 

^ •• " 3 85 4 10 

Halter kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 

5 p.o. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie-out chains 65 p.c. 

Stallfixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, dis- 
count 35 p c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

Copper. 

Ingot Per 100 lb. 

■English B.S., ton lots 15 0J 

Lake Superior 

Bars. 
Cut lengths round, y, to % >n- 23 TO 25 CO 
" round and square 

1 to 2 inches.... 23 00 25 00 
Sheet. 
Plain, 14 ox., and light, 16 

ox., 14x48 and 14x60 22 00 22 50 

Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., irregular sizes 22 to 23 01 

Tinned copper sheets ^4 00 

Planished • 32 00 

Braziers (InBheets.) 

4\fift.25to30 lbs. ea., perlb 23 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 22 

50-lb. and above. " .... 21 
Boiler and T.K.Pitts 

Plain TlDned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb ° 32 

Copper Ware. 
Discount, 50 per cent. 

Brass. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 per oent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled. 2x4 23 

Tubing, base, per It 23% 



Zinc Spelter 

Foreign, perlb 5 50 6 00 

Domestlo " 

Zinc Sheet. 

5-cwt. casks 6 '0 6 25 

Partcasks 6 25 6 50 

Lead . 
Imported Pig, per 100 lb .. 3 50 3 7' 

Bar, 1 lb "" 95 

Sheets, 2% lbs. sq.ft., by .... 06% 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs., " .... 06 

Note.— Cut sheets % cent per lb. extra. 
Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists 
at 7c. per lb. and 35 p.c. dis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
i-ft. lengths lists at 7% cents. 
Shot. 

Common, $6.50 per 100 lb. ; chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb. ; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 22% p.c. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 ner cent, cash, freights equalized. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 

Discount, 60 and 10 per cen t. on medium and 
extra heavy, and 60 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Perlb. Perlb. 

Bar half-and-half, guarant'd .... 19 

Bar half-and-half, commer'l .... 18% 

Refined 18 

Wiping 17% 

Antimony. 

Cookson's, per lb 10 

White Lead. Per 100 lb. 

Pure 5 87% 

No.l 5 50 

No.2 5 12% 

No.3 4 75 

No.4 4 37% 

Munro's Select Flake White 6 37y 2 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 6 12% 

Brandram'sB B. Genuine 8 25 

" No. 1 7 50 

Atove prices are for 25 lb and upwai ds. 
Bed Lead. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $4 75 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 00 

No. 1, 5601b. casks, per cwt 4 25 

No. 1,1001b. kegs, perewt 4 50 

White Zinc. 

Extra Red Seal 06 08 

No. 1 005% (7 

No.2 05 06 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, casks 5 25 

Pure, kegs 5 50 

No. l.casks 5 00 

No. 1, kegs 5 25 

Prepared Paints. 
In %, % and 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 125 

Second qualities, per gallon 110 

Barn (inbbls.) 60 90 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 1 40 

Canada Paint Co's Pure 125 

Toronto Lead & Color Go's Pure — 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 1 20 

Stewart* Wood's Champion Pure. 1 20 
Colors in Oil 
25 lb. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian Red, per lb 04% 06 

Chrome Yellow 12 14 

Golden Ochre 08 10 

French " 06 

MarineBlack 09 

Chrome Green 10 

Frenr-h Imperial Green 12 

Sign Writers' Black 16 

Bumf Umber 11 

" Sienna 11 

Raw Timber 11 

" Sienna 11 



1 30 

2 uu 

1 25 

2 00 

2 00 

3 25 
2 00 

1 75 

2 25 
10 
10 
09 
09 
18 
10 
05 

18 

1 00 

07 

1 50 
10 
60 
95 

per lb. 
16*4 
17 



Colors, Dry. 

Common Ochre bbls 110 

Yellow Ochre J.F.L.S.), bbls ... 

Yellow Ochre (La Belle) 1 15 

Brussels Ochre 

Venetian Red (best), bbl . . . . 1 75 

English Oxides, per cwt 3 00 

Amerioan Oxides, bbls 1 25 

Canadian Oxides, 1 Ms. 1 25 

Super Magnetic Oxides, 93p.o. 2 00 
Burnt Sienna, pure, perlb... 

" Umber, " " .. 

do Raw 

Drop Black, pure 

Chrome Yellows, pure 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb. 6 1 9 

Golden Ocbre C4 

Ultramarine Blue in 28-lb.. 

boxes, per lb 06 

Fire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb .... 

Genuine Eng.Litharge, perlb 

Mortar Color, per 1001b 125 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45 lb. 1 8 

Whiting, bbl 55 

English Vermillion in 30-lb. bags. 
Paris Green. 

Petroleum Casks 

Arsenic Kegs 

50-lb. and lm'-lb. drums i}% 

25-lb. drums ) g 

1-lb packages 18% 

%-lb. do 20% 

Mb tins 19%* 

%-lb do 21% 

F.OB. Montreal. Terms— 3 p.c. off 30 
days, or 4 nio?. feem date of de ivery. 
Bine Stone. 

Casks, for spraying, per lb 07 

100-lb. lots, do. per lb 08 

Patty. 

Bulk in bbls. 1 90 

Bulk in less quantity 2 05 

Bladders in bbls 2 25 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose 2 40 

Bladders in 25-lb. tins 2 35 

Bladders in 12%-lb. tins 2 65 

Bladders in bu'k or tios less than 10011.2 90 
Varnishes. 
In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. net. 

Carriage, No. 1 150 160 

Pale Durable body 4 10 4 25 

" rubbing 2 85 3 00 

Gold Size, Japan 2 85 3 00 

No. 1 Brown Japan 

Elastic Oak 

Furniture, extra 

No.l 

Hard Oil Finish 165 

Light Oil Finish 140 

Demar , 1 7J 

Shellao, white 2 3 

" orange 2 25 

Turpentine Brown Japan,. 

" Black Japan.... 85 

" No. I.. 70 
Elastilite Varnish 1 gal. can, each, $3.00. 

Granitine Floor Finish per gal., $2.75. 

Maple Leaf Coach Enamels ; Size 1, $1 20 
Size 2, 70c. ; Size 3, 4Uc. each. 

Castor Oil. 
East India, in cases, per lb. . 1 9% 

" " small lots 10 

Cod Oil, Etc. 

CodOilpergal 50 

Pure Olive 

" Neatsfoot 

Glne. 

Common 08% 

French Medal 14 

Cabinet sheet 12 

White, extra 18 

Gelatine 22 

Strip 18 

Coopers 19 

Huttner 



85 

1 50 
1 25 

85 

1 75 
1 60 

1 80 

2 45 
2 35 
1 25 
90 
75 



10 
10% 

55 

1 20 
90 

C? 
14% 



30 



34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



JAriES HUTTON & CO. 

Sole Agents in Canada for 

Joseph Rodgers & Sons, Limited, Thomas Goldsworthy & Sons, 
Steel, Peech & Tozer, Limited, Burroughes & Watts, Limited, 

W. & S. Butcher, Etc., Etc., 

Have reopened their offices in Victoria Chambers, 

232 McGill Street, * -MONTREAL. 



HARDWARE. 

A in inanition. 

Cartridges. 

B B Caps Dom. 50 and 5 per cent, 

Rim Fire Piatol, dia. 40 p. o., Amer. 

Him Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5 p. o. 

n^itral Fire Pistol and Rifie, lOp.o. Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes Dom. 
30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 percent. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer. 
add 5 p.o. to list. B.B. Caps, discbunt 40 
per cent. Amer. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap and 
" Dominion " grades, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 p A. advance on list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 percent.; American, $1.60. 
Wads per lb. 

Best thick white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bags 1 "0 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-lb. bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 
each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

Hand smaller gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 

Discount, 20 peroent. 

Anvils. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 10% 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 09V4 

Brook's, ... 11% 

Angers. 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 p.c. off list. 
Axes. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 1100 18 00 

Benoh Axes, 40 p.c. 

Broad Axes, 25 percent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boy's Axes 5 75 6 75 

SpllttingAxes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Bestquality ••• 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tubs. 

Zino 6 00 

Copper, discount 15 p.c. off revised list 
Baths. 
Standard Enameled. 

5%-inoh rolled rim, 1st quality 25 00 

Antl-Frlction Metal . 

"Tandem" A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

C " Oil 1 /, 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 

Frictionless metal, per lb 23 

SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. 

Aluminum, genuine 41 

Dynamo 27 

Special ••• il 

Aluminum, 99 p.c. pure "Syracuse .. 45 
Phosphorine anti-friction metal — 25 
Bells. 
Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per oent. 



Cow. 
Amerioan make, discount 66% per oent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per oent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant'e 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro' , disoount 45 per cent. 
Farm. 

American , each 1 25 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, perdoz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blackamitha', discount 40 per oent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 60 percent. 
Standard, 60 and lOper cent. 
No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60 10 and 10 p.c. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 p c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockf ord, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings'Gen. , net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 percent 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, perdoz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, per groB8 2 25 5 20 

Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 12 

Bolteand Nuts . Percent. 

Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list) 55 and 5 

" full square ($2.40 list) 60 and 5 
" " Norway iron ($3 Hat).. 60 and 5 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 55 and 5 

Plough Bolts 55 and 5 

Blank Bolts 60 

Bolt Ends 60 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 70 

Coach Screws, cone point 70 

Nuts, square, all sizes 3'\ic per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizea. 4c. per lb. off 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c. 

Nuts, io 50 lb. lots %c. per lb extra, in leaa 
than 50 lb. lots, %c. extra. 

Boot Calks. 
Small and medium, ball, per M — 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Diacount 62% percent. 

Broilers . 
Light, dia., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dls., 65 to 67% percent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent 

Henis.No.8, " 6 00 

Henis, No. 9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers' Cleavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 1100 

American, perdoz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Tarred felt, per 100 lb 1 70 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 lb. 

per rol i 85 

Ready rooting, 3-ply, not under 65 lb. 

per roll 1 10 

Carpet felt, per ton 45 00 

Dry sheathing, per roll, 400 sq ft 35 

Tar sheathing, " " " 45 

Dry fibre " " " 55 

Tarred fibre, 65 

O.K. tl.X.L., 70 

Resin-sized. " " " 41 

Oiled Bheatihog, " 600 " 110 

" 400 " 70 

Riof coating, in barrels, per gal 17 

' " small packages 25 

Refined tar, per barrel 4 50 

Coal tar, " 4 00 

Coal tar, less than barrels, per gal... 15 

Roofing pitch, per 100 lb 85 

Bull Rings. 
Copper , $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in . 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass net revised iat, 



Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dia., 60 per cent. 

Wrought Steel . 
Fast Joint, die. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Loose Pin, dia. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dia. 70, 70 and 5 per o nt. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretcher s . 

Amerioan, perdoz 100 150 

Billiards, per doz 6 50 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dia. 55 to 57% peroent. 
Plate, dia. 52% to 57% percent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nob. 31 and 32, per groaa 8 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 25 2 75 

English " 3 00 3 15 

Belgian " 2 50 2 76 

Canadian hydraulic 125 150 

Chalk. 
Carpenters Colored, per groaa 45 75 

White lump, per owt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon, per gross 14 18 

Chisels. 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Warnock's, dia. 70 percent. 
P. S. & W. Extra 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 

Churns. 
Revolving Churns, metal framea— No. 0, $8— 
No. 1, $8.50— No. 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00— 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames— 20o. each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 56 
p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 54 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p. c. cash in 30 days 
Clips. 
Axle dia. 65 per cent. 

Closets Net. 

Plain York or Ontario Syphon Jet. $9 60 
Emb. York or Ontario Syphon Jet. 10 20 

Fittings 1 00 

PlainElginorTeu. SyphonWashout 6 00 
Emb. Elgin orTeu. Syphon Washout 6 60 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic plain 9 60 
" " " " emb. 10 20 

Plain Richelieu 4 00 

Emb. Richelieu 4 25 

Connections 1 25 

Low Down Oat. Sy. Jet, plain 1170 

' " " emb'd 12 30 

Closet connection 1 25 

BaBinaP.O., 14in 70 

" oval, 17x14 in 150 

■' " 19x15 in 2 25 

Compasses, Dividers, Etc. 
American, dia. 62% to 65 per cent. 

Cradles, Grain . 
Canadian ,dis. 25 to 33 1 '% per oent. 
Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. & D.,No. 3, per pair 17% 

" 5, " 22% 

6, " 15 

Boynto pattern " 20 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.c. ) 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 1 60 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 
Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent 
Carpenters, dis. 70 percent. 
Drills. 
Hand and Breast. 
Millar's Falls, perdoz. net list. 
DRILL BITS. 
Morse, dis., 37% to 40 per cent. 
Standard dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

Faucets. 
Common, cork-lined, dis. 35 per cent. 

ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) per doz- 

5 and 6-inch, common 1 20 

7-inch 1 35 

Polished, 15o. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 45 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 



FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Disoount off revised list, 40 per cent. 
FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 70 and 10 per cen 

Arcade 70 " 10 " 

Kearney * Foot 70 " 10 " 

Difston's 70 " 10 " 

American 70 " It " 

J. Barton Smith 7" " 10 " 

McOlellan 70 " 10 " 

Eagle 70 " 10 " 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 60. 10 and 5 " 

Royal 80 " 

Globe 70 to 75 " 

Black Diamond, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 p.o 
.Towitt'e, English list, 25 to 27% per oent. 
Nicholson File Co 'a "Simplicity'' file handle 
per gross, 85c. to $1.50. 

GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size United Per Per Per Per 

Inches. 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft 

Under26 2 20 4 25 .... 6 25 

26to40 2 40 4 65 .... S 75 

41 to 50 5 10 .... 7 50 

51 to 60 5 35 .... 8 50 

61to70 5 75 .... 70 

71 to80 6 25 .... 11 00 

81 to 85 7 00 .... 12 55 

86 to 90 7 75 . . 15 00 

91 to95 17 50 

96tol00 .. 20 50 

101tol05 24 00 

K6toll0 27 50 

GAUGES 

Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 

Winn's, Noa. 26 to 33, each... 165 3 40 

HALTERS. 

Rope, % per groaa 

,r % " 9 00 

" %to% 14 00 

Leather, 1 in., per doz 3 87% 4 00 

" IK in., " 5 15 5 20 

Web,-perdoz 187 2 45 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole'a, dia. 5 to 10 peroent. Can. dis. 
25 to 27% per oent. 

Taok. 

Magnetic, perdoz 1 10 1 20 

Sledge. 

Canadian, per lb 07% 08* 

Ball Pean. 

English and Can., per lb - 22 25 

HANDLES. 

Axe.perdoz.net 150 2 00 

Store door, per doz 100 150 

Fork. 
C. k B. , dia. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. & B , dia. 40 per cent. rev. iat. 
Saw. 

American, perdoz 1 00 1 25 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 3 v 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 40 percent. 

Oroaa-Cut Saws. 

Canadian, per pair 1394 

HANGERS. doz. pain. 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns , 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered- 
No. 11, 5-ft. run 8 40 

No.11%, 10-ft.run 10 80 

No. 12. 10-ft.run 12 60 

No. 14, 1 5-ft. run 2100 

Lane's O.N.T. track, per foot 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
Discount, 70 per cent. 

HATCHETS. 
Canadian, die. 40 to 42% per oen 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



USE PHOSPHORINE ANTI-FRICTION METAL 



^° 



It is the new dis- 
overy. Ask for 
rticulars. 



It is the only 
Anti-Friction 
Metal known to be 
chemically pure. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingottanper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze. Nickle, etc., always in stock. 



CANADIAN WORKS, MONTREAL, P.Q. 
AMERICAN " SYRACUSE, N.Y. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



35 



HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb... . 06% 
5-in., " .... 06V« 
" 6-in., " .... 06 
" 8-in., " .... 05% 
" 10-in., " .... 05'/, 
Light T and strap, dis. 65 and 5 per cent. 
Screw book and hinge — 

6 to 10 in., per 100 lbs 4 25 

12 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 25 

Per gro. pairs. 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 
Oarden, Mortar, etc., dis. 50 and lOp.c. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Disoount, 45 and 5 per cent. 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Bird Cage, perldoz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 1 00 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can. tine. 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat. discount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per cent. 
HORSE NAILS. 
"C'brand 50 and 7%p.c.off new list! Oval- 
"M" brand 50, 10 and 5 percent. J head 
Countersunk, 60 per cent. 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal. 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger. smaller. 
Light, medium and heavy... 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 60 3 85 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

F.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Ouelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 p c. off list, June 1899. 
ICE PICKS. 

Star per doz 3 03 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.c. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lb 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.o. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Can., dis., 45 p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N. P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz.... 6 00 9 00 
Shutter, porcelain, F. & L 

screw, per gross 130 4 00 

White door knobs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

d, HJlast.perdoz 7 00 

No'5 "Wright's " 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 00 

Dashboard, oold blast 9 00 

No.0 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined, per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

All glass 120 130 

LINES. 

Fish pergross 105 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LOOKS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 
Russelft Erwiu, per doz....- 3 00 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 



Padlock. 

English and Am. per doz 50 6 00 

Scandinavian, " 100 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 20 to 25 p.r. 

MACHINE SCREWS. Iron and Brass. 
Flat head discount 25 p.c. 
Round Head discount 20 p.c. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' per doz 1 25 1 50 

Carpenters', hiokory,perdo7. 125 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Oaulkingeach 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian, per doz 5 50 6 50 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.o. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 
Discount, 25 percent. 

NAILS. 
Quotations are : Cut. Wire. 

2 d and 3d $3 35 $3 55 

3d 3 00 3 22 

4and5d 2 75 3 05 

6and7d 2 65 2 !0 

8 and 9d 2 50 2 70 

10andl2d 2 45 2 65 

16 and 20d 2 40 2 60 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 35 2 55 

Wire nails in carlots are 82.50 
Galvanizing 2c. per lb. net extra. 
Steel 'Cut Nails 10c extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 75 p.c. 
Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barrel nails, dis. 25 per cent 
NAIL PULLERS. 

GermanandAmerican 185 3 50 

NAIL SETS. 
Square round, and octagon 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 CO 

POULTRY NETTING. 
2-in. Mesh, 19 w.g., dis. 6) p.c. 
2- n. Mesh, 18 w.g. and heav er, 50 and 10 p.o. 

OAKUM. Per 100 lb. 

Navy 6 00 

U.S. Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Water White (U.S.) 16'/, 

Prime White (U.S.) 15% 

Water White (Can.) 15 

Prime White (Can.) 14 

OILERS. 
MoClary's Model galvan. oil 
can. with pump, 5 gal., 

per doz 10 00 

Z i nc'and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 125 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dufferin pattern pails, dis . 45 p.c. 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized wash tubs discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 40 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, dip. 40 p.c. 
6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails, dis. 40 p.c. 
Creamer cans, dis. 40 p.c. 
PICKS. 

Per doz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 
Porcelain head, per gross... 175 3 00 
Brass head " .... 40 1 00 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 

PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian dis. 40 per ceit. 

American dia. 50. 
Wood, fanoy Canadian or American 7% 
to 40 per cent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English, per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 
Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.c. 
Button's Imitation, per doz.. 5 00 9 00 
German, per doz 60 2 60 



PLUMBERS' BRASS GOODS. 

Standard Compression work, dis. 60 p.c. 
"J.M.T." Cushion work, dis. £0 p.c. 
Fuller work, dis. 65 p.c. 
6 doz. lots and over of the above, extra dis. 

10 pc. 
Rough Stops and Stoos and Wa hers, dis. 

60 p c. With, in lots of 2 doz. and over. 

an extra dis. of 10 p.c. 
"J.M.T.'' Globe, Agnle and Check Valves, 

dis 55 co- 
Standard Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 

dis. 60 p.c. 
"J.M.T.'' Radiator Valves, dis. 55 p c. 
Standard " ' dis., 60 p.c. 

Patent Quick Opening Valves, dis. 65 p.c. 

and 10 p.c 
No. 1 compression bath cock, net . . 2 00 

No. 4 2 00 

No. 7, Fuller's 2 20 

No 4%, " 2 35 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

cock, hot and cold, per doz. . 15 00 
Patent Compression Cushion, bath 

ccck, No. 2208 2 25 

POWDER. 
Velox Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 

'OOlb.orless 85 

1,0001b. or more 80 

Net 30 days. 
PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount 25 per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz 55 100 

Axle 22 33 

Screw 27 100 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 1 80 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 140 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 100 185 

Conductors'* •' 9 00 15 00 

Tinners', solid.per set 00 72 

•' hollow per inch 00 100 

RANGE BOILERS. Net. 

Dominion, 35 " 6 75 

40 " 7 75 

Ronald's Galvanized, 30 gallons 6 50 

" " 35 " .... 7 50 

40 " .... 8 50 

Copper, 30 gallons 25 00 

" 35 " 29 00 

" 40 " 33 00 

RAKES. 
Wood, lOpercent. 

RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Elliot's 4 00 18 00 

Geo. Butleri Co.'s 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

" King Cutter ...12 50 50 00 

Wade & Butcher's... 3 60 10 00 

Theile & Quack's 7 00 12 00 

REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 pe n 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 

and 10 per cent. 
Iron Burrs, discount 55 per cent. 
ExtraB on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons , %e. 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons ,1c 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets with uiual proportion burrs, 45 
an<i 10 dis.. cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Copper Burrs only, 30 and p.c. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets 
%-lb. cartonB, lc. per lb. 
RIVET SETS 
Canadian dis. 35 1037% percent. 
ROPE ETC. 

Sisal 12 

Pure Manilla 16 

"British" Manilla 13 V 

Cotton, 3-16inch andlarger 16 

" 5-32 inch.... 21 

" %inch 22 

Russia Deep Sea 15 

Jute g 

Lath Yarn 10^ 



RULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, dis. 37% co40p,c. 

SADIRONS. per set. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished 65 

" No. 50, nickle-plated ...... 75 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% pe cent 
B & A. sand, 40 and 5 per cent. 
Emery, 40 per cent. 
Garoet(Rurton'B), 5 to 10 p.c. advance on list. 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. . . 9 50 

SAWS. 
Hand Disston's,dis.l2% p.o. 
S. & D., 40 per cent. 
OrosBcut, DiBston's.perft.... 35 55 

S. * D. , dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2 an d 3 . 

Hack, oomplete, each 75 2 75 

' rame only 75 

_ „ SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 2 25 2 50 

Solid, " 1 75 2 00 

_ „ SASH CORD. 

Per lb 23 30 

SAW SETS. 

Lincoln' and Whiting, per doz... 4 75 

Handsets, No. I Woodyatt(Morrill) 4 25 

X-cut seta , No. 3 Woodyatt (Morrill) 9 50 

~ , . SCALES. 

Standard, 45 p.c. 
Champion, 55 p.c. 
Spring Balances, 10 p.o. 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 

Dominion, 55 p.c. 

Richelieu, 55 p.c. 
Warren s new Standard 45 p.c. 

" Champion 65 p.c. 
SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent s per doz 65 100 

„ . „„ , SCREWS 

w™°' 5' f," bf'Kbtand steel, 87% and lOp.c 

° d *■ J?-\. d i s - 82 ^» and I" PC- 

nr j ^-H., brass dia. 80 and 10 p.o. 
W .°. od '5-J t -V dis. 75 and 10 pc. 

• < „■£" bron ze, dig. 75 p.o. 
R.H. *• 70 p o 

Drive Screws, 87% andlOperoent. 

Bench, wood, per doz 3 25 4 00 

iron, " lttt 4 25 5 75 

Set, Case hardened, 60 per cent 
Square Cap, 50 and 5 per cent 
Hexagon Cap, 45 per cent. 

8CYTHES. 
Per doz, net 900 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS. 

Bailey Cutlery Co., full nickeled, dis. 60 p c 
Seymour s, dis. 50 and 10 p.o. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 percent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 450 1150 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, l%lb.,perlb 37 

21b. or over, per lb ..,,. 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, per doz 2 40 2 55 

Mo. 494, '* 7 95 o an 

Steel, dis. 60. 10 and 5 p.c."" 3 *° 

Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.o. 
STAMPED WARE. 
Plain, dis. ,75 and 12% p.c. off revised list 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revisedlist. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 50 4 „„ 

"lain 325 375 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 



36 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PITTSBURGH, 

U. S. A. 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF" 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

CHAIN 

Proof Coil, B.B., B.B.B., Crane, Dredge Chain, Trace Chains, Cow Ties, etc. 

ALEX ffi?5r QIBB ' -Canadian Representatives- ^™? L ™ & C °" 



t 



OF ALL KINDS. 



Montreal. 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 



For other Provinces. 



STOCKS AND DIES. 
American die. 25 p.c. 

STONE. Per lb. 

Washita 28 60 

Hindoatan 06 07 

slip 09 09 

Labrador 13 

Axe 15 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas 00 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe. per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind.2in,40 to200 lb.per ton 25 00 

" under 40 lb. " .... 28 00 

Grind, under 2 in. thick " .... 29 00 

STOVE PIPES. 
5 and 6 inch Per 100 lengths .... 7 00 
7 inch " " .... 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 

No. 4—3 dozen in case, net cash #4 80 

No. 6— 3 dozen in case, " .... 8 40 
TACKS BRADS, ETC. 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80&12% 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned 85 

Carpet tacks, blued 80* 15 

Tl " tinned 80 & 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cat tacks, blued, in dozens only ..80 

" M weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 4 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk. . . .85, 12 l / 2 4 12 l / 3 
" brush, blued & tinned, bulk.. 70 
" gimp, blued, tinned and 

japmned 75 4 12 l / a 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 55y 2 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 



Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 4) 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

Lining tacks, in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin capped trunk nails 25 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

bulk 40 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin, per doz 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

" steel, each 80 8 00 

THERMOMETERS. 
Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.c. 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Same, Newhouse, dis. 25 p.c. 
Game, H. 4N„ P. S. 4 W., 65 p.o. 
Game, steel, 72y„ 75 p.o. 

TROWELS. 
Disston a discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

8 .4 D. , discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian , per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 18% 

4-ply 23% 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, " 27 35 

VISES. 

Wright's • .... 13V4 

Brook's 12% 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

" " " No. 2 5 50 

Saw Vise 4 50 9 00 



ENAMELLED WARE. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blueand White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 

SMOOTH SU1L WIRE. 

No. 0-9 gauge $2 60 

10 " Pc. e tra. 

11 " 12c. " 

Vi " 10c. " 

13 " 30 j. " 

14 " 40c. " 

15 " 55c. " 

16 " 70c. " 

Add 60c. for coppering and $2 for tinning. 
Extras net per 100 lb. —Oiled wire 10c 

spring wire $1 . J5, special hay baling wire 30c 
best steel wire 75:* , bright s^ft, drawn 15c 
charcoal (extra quality) $1 25, packed in 
casks or cases 15c, bagging and papering 
10c, 50 and 1001b. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. 
bundleal5c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25a, in 
lib. hanks 50c, in %-lb. han*s75c, in %-lb. 
hanks $1. 

Fine Steel Wire, dis. 22% per cent. 
List of extras : In 100-lb. lots : No. 
17, $5-No. 18, 85.50— No. 19, $6-No. 20, 
«6.65-No. 21, $7-No. 22, 87.30— No. 23, 
7.65-No. 24, 88— No. 25, 89— No. 26 
89.50— No. 27, 810-No. 28,811 No. 29. 
812- No. 30, 813— No. 31,814-No. 32 $15, 
No. 33, 816— No. 34, 817. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, 82— Nos. 26-31 
84— Nos. 32-34, 86. Coppered, 5c— oil, 
ing, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles,15c— in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
in %-lb. hanks, 75c— in %-lb. hanks, 81— 
packed in casks or cases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c. 



Brasa wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per cent, off the 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and 10 per cent, net cash 30 

days, f.o.b. factory. 
Galvanized Wire, perlOOlb.— Nos. 6,7,8,83.50 
to $3.85— No. 9, $2.85 to 83.15— No. 10 
83.60 10 83.95— No. 11, $3.70 to 84.10- No 
12, 83 to $3.30— No. 13, $3.10 to $3.40— 
No. 14, $4.10 to $4.50— No. 15, $4.60 to 
$5.05— No. 16. $4.85 to $5.35. Baee sizes, 
Nos. 6 to 9 $2.52% f.o b. Cleveland. 
Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand. No. 17, 
$4.65; No. 18, *2.90; No. 19, $2.60. Hol- 
low 6 strand. No. 17, $4.30; No. 18. $2.70 
No. 19. $2.35; No 20, $2.30, f.e.b. Hamil 
ton, Toronto, Montreal. 

WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 3 00 

Salvanized, plain twiat 3 00 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.77% 
in less than carlots, and $2.65 in carlots 
WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft. , net. . 1 25 
WASTE COTTON. per lb. 

Colored 6 

White 8 

WRENCHES. 
\cme, 35 to 37% per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe's Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

Towers' Engineer, each 2 00 7 00 

" S., per doz 5 80 6 00 

G. 4 K. 'a Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket , per doz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian.. " ... 24 00 

Royal American., " — 24 00 

Sampson " — 24 00 

Terms 4 months, or 3 p.c. 30 days. 
WROUGHT IRON WA8HERS. 
Canadian make, discount, 40 per cent. 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in The Canadian Hardware 
and Metal Merchant. 

ADVERTISING inWESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG CANADA. 

"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for expoit With or without " Emlyn " 
Patent Guard. So'e maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

Cables — Emlyn Engineering Works, 

Machinery," Newport. Newport, Mon., England. 

Will Hold Dp a Shelf! 

That's what a shelf bracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be 

NOTHING BETTER 

NOTHING CHEAPER 

than the .... 

BRADLEY STEEL SHELF BRACKET 

It is well Japanned, Strong and Light. 

'I he cavins in freight is a good profit, aside 
from the lower price at which the goods are sold. 
BSg- Order director through your jobber. 

ATLAS MFG. CO., New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 




DIAMOND EXTENSION STOVE BACK 



They are easily 
adjusted and 
fitted to a stove 
by any one. 

Please your 
customers by 
supplying them 
immediately 
with what 
they want. 



Patented, July 11th, 1893. 



Canadian Patent, June 14th. 1894. 




Sold by 
Jobbers 
of . . . 

Hardware 
Tinware 

and 

Stoves. 



EXTENDED. 

Manufactured by THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
" A. R. WOODYATT & CO.. Guelph, Ontario. 



*■ 

.,.. 



CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY 

MONTRFAL. 



Watch our ad. in next issue, or write to us for 
particulars on our patented 

Automatic Door Strip and Weather Strip 

Specially adapted for cold climates and takes 
the place of the inner window. 

HELMS & HELMS, 148-50 wuiow St., 

PHILADELPHIA. 









ONTARIO 

NUTWORK 
PARIS 
ONT. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Sauare and Hexagon. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishingto berepresentedin Canada. 

R. BAILEY & SON 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

STOVE LININGS '.%, R &%V 

All kinds of Fire Brick and Fire Clay Work, 

Paving Tile, etc. 

Wholesale Only. - - Write for particulars. 

1220 Yonge Street. TORONTO. 

ONTARIO SILVER GO., 

Limited, 
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

u ( > ..* FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 

Manufacturers of ELECTR0 PLATE. . . . 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 



I 



It is the little leaks that make the 
large losses. You can avoid the 
leaks in 

Wrapping Papers 

if you buy from these mills. Our brown 
and manilla papers are of known quality — 
always run full weight — and count 480 sheets 
to the ream every time. 

—We are always prompt in 
— filling letter orders. 

CANADA PAPER CO ., Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL 



HAND-FORGEO 



HAND-GROUND 



The Batty Stove 
& Hardware Co. 

Successors to 

Tho Toronto Branch of THE COPP BROS. CO., 

Limited. 

Wholesale dealers in 



Stoves, Ranges, Mantels, 

Grates, Tiles, Etc. 

Hot-Air Registers, 
Hot-Air Dampers. 

STOVE REPAIRS FOR ■ 

COPP AND GARLAND STOVES. 



THE BATTY STOVE 4 



E CO, 




Fully Warranted. 



Ask for Catalogue. 



IMCA-IDE IIST O^HST-A-ID^ Zr3~5T 

BAILEY CUTLERY CO., LIMITED 

BRANTFORD, ONTARIO. 



CHAS. F. CLARK, President. 



JARED CHITTENDEN Treasurer. 



.ESTABLISHED 1849. 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices : Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized 
world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 

—OFFICES IN CANADA 

LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN. N.B. 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 

THOS. C. IRVING, Gen, Man, Western Canada, Toronto, 10HN A. FULTON, Gen. Man, Eastern Canada, Montreal. 



HALIFAX, N.S. 
OTTAWA. ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



279 Queen West, TORONTO. 




Canadian Representative: ALEXANDER GIBB, 13 St. John St., MONTREAL. 
75 YEARS. ESTABLISHED 1825. 75 YEARS. 




CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. 

Not connected with sny Shear Combination. 



NEW YORK OFFICE, 90 Chamber! St . 
NEWARK. N.J., U.S.A. 



-fif^^z*. 



Eat. 1968 



Inc. 1896 



Black Diamond File Works 

6. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve -««• — »- Medals 



■**>» 



Awarded 

By JURORS ^ 

International Expositions 

Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 




4^%%r%%r%^%%/»^t>^fv%/%/t>/tytvty%/t>%'ty»* 



1902 





[ t 1902 



We manufacture the most popular and best 
selling lines of Garden Hose in Canada. Our "Ma" 
tese Cross" brand we confidently recommend *£ 
the finest Garden Hose on the market. 

We have other grades not quite so expensive, 
but good reliable brands, viz. : "Lion" (the popular 
medium-priced hose), "King" "Sun" and "Leader." 

Our " Kinkproof " (wire wound) hose is wired 
by a special process controlled solely by ourselves, 
and is so constructed that it may be cut at any 
wind of the wire without loosening or uncoiling, 
the wire being self-gripping throughout each 
length. 



The Gutta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 



OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms- 
45-47-49 West Front St. 



Factories- 



I 16-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



TORONTO, 



CANADA. 



Notice of 

Removal 

After the first day of February, 1902, 
our address will be 

No. 53 St. Sulpice St. 
Montreal. 

B.& S.H.THOMPSON & CO. 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Houseline 
Hambrollne 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Seallne 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlln 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



"RED THREAD" Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 



"Limited 



Western Ontario Representative- 
WD. B. STEWART, 



Tel 94. 



27 Front St. West, TORONTO 



MONTREAL, QUE. 



M©HS 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. FEBRUARY 8, 1902 



NO. 6. 




\CUTLERYs 



FOR SALE BY LEADINQ WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES. 



Lysaght's Black Sheets 

"Queen's Head" CR.CA.— Highest grade, dead flat. 

"Southern Cross" CR.CA. — First-class quality, 
dead flat. 

"Southern Cross" C.A.— Same sheets, not dead flat. 

Electrical Sheets, Tack Sheets, etc., etc. 

No common sheets made. 



JOHN LYSAGHT. Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL, 
BRISTOL, EN6. Managers Canadian Branch. 



Have you got our new prices on 

BOILERS AND RADIATORS ? 

IF NOT, communicate with us 
before placing YOUR ORDER. 






THE DOMINION RADIATOR CO., LIMITED 

Head Office, Dufferin Street, Toronto, Canada. 



FELT 



Weather Strip 



DOORS : WINDOWS. 



FOOT WARMERS 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



Cor. King and Victoria Streets. ^^TORON 



I BRASS 

Rods Sheets, Tubing, j 

Samuel. Sons & Benjamin, London and Liverpool, Eng. ^ 

| M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. j 

§ General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants. ^ 

1 
^ 27 Wellington St. West, ^TORONTO, ONT. | 

iittittiuiumiuuiiuutiutuuiuuu^^ 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



James Cartland & Son 

Manufacturers of every desciiption of Limited 

CABINET, BUILDERS', FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND. 




London Showrooms : 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 



CR.Co. Star 




RED RUBBER PACKING 

FOR HIGH-GRADE WORK 



Good Packing Good Price 



Good Profits 



Good Advertising Matter 



Send for samples, prices and advertising matter. 



The Canadian Rubber Co. 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 



m 



"YANKEE" 
RATCHET SCREW DRIVER 

NSI5 





Our "YANKEE" Tool Book 

tells all about them. Mailed 



free on application. 



No. 15. "Yankee Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 

•YANKEE 
ft ft L SP IRAL- BAT C HET DNVfi. 

No. 30 " Yankee " Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 






No. 41. "Yankee" Automatic Drill," Eight Drill Points in Handle. 




Manufacturers also of 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chlppers. 
Fluting Machines, 

Hand Fluters. 



No. 50. "Yankee " Reciprocating Drill, for Iron, Steel, Brass, Wood, etc. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 




No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 

Screw .Driver. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WINDOW GLASS 



—TO IMPORT. 



nmnw 



EVERY KIND OF PLATE AND WINDOW GLASS IN STOCK. 

BENT GLASS of all kinds, our own manufacture. Closest 



Prompt Deliveries- 



ices. 



TORONTO PLATE GLASS IMPORTING CO., 



Mill & Rutherford 



Warerooms and Offices— 135 to 143 Victoria St. 
Bending Works-209 to 213 Victoria St. 



TORONTO 



USE PHOSPHORINE ANTI-FRICTION METAL 



It is the new dis- 
covery. Ask for 
particulars. 

It is the only 
Anti-Friction 
Metal known to be 
chemically pure. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nickle, etc., always In stock. 



CANADIAN WORKS, MONTREAL, P.O. 
AMERICAN " SYRACUSE, NY. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 




Steel Frame. 



MAXWELL MOWER 

8-inch Low Wheel. 



ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA. 



"Maxwell Favorite Churn " Lawn Mowers. 



PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Beariogs, and Foot and Hand Lever 
Drive, and Detachable Driving Link. Improv- 
ed for season of 1903. Steel or Wood Frame 
as desired. 



Wheelbarrows. «■ 



Four different Sizes. 



High and Low Wheels, 
from 12-in. to 20-in. 
widths. Cold Rolled 

Steel Shafting, Crucible Steel Knives and 

Cutting Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer vou these 
articles 

SEND DIRECT TO US. 

"THE MAXWELL" 

Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



- WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. wholesale 



LUMBERMEN'S SUPPLIES 



Repair Links 



Repair Links 



Proof Chain 




OPEN. BRIGHT 



RIVETTED, JAPANNED 



Cant Hooks 



Peavies 





Iron Wedges 



ttL 




c/b-WJO 



hs 



Pike Poles 



- 1 ■ « m m a i n fil l ■ 



*" ~ — *- — fc ^-' g ^' - "**iraai 1 1 1 urn !■ i-" - — ■ 



Lumbermen's Boot Calks 

Small Ball 
Medium Ball 



m e fe^ 



u >MWiH 



Small Heel 



Iron, Steel, Axes, X-Cut Saws, Files, Nails, Glass, White Lead, Rope, etc. 
H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto. 



WE S oL P «« n -r. « Oraham Nails are the Very 

Factory: Dufferln Street, Toronto. 



Best 



OUR PRICES 

ARE RIGHT 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 

Manufacturers of the celebrated 




BARB and PLAIN 

Galvanized Wife 

Canadian Office : 
6 ST. SACRAMENT ST., MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 



WRIGHT'S 

Insect 




Sprayers 

PLAIN TIN, 
LACQUERED, 
ALL BRASS. 

"BEST ON EARTH." 



Manufactured by 

E. T.WRIGHT SCO. 

HAMILTON, ONT., and 
MONTREAL, QUE. 
J. il. Hanson, Agent, Montreal. 



KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32, Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 




Samples sent free on application. 

HORSE NAILS-" C." Brand Horse - Nails 
Canada Horse Nail Co. 

"BRASSITE" GOODS — «unn Castor Co. 
Limited, Birmingham, Eng. 






THE PROPRIETOR'S STORY. 




ALABASTINE we have been selling nigh on to twenty years, and know it to be reliable. 

We dealers also know that Alabastine is what is in demand, and that to sell anything else for coating 
walls, we would have to do so on the recommendation that it was the same thing, or just as good as 
ALABASTINE. Would not offer a substitute when Alabastine is called for ; no necessity to do that, 
as it is easier to sell Alabastine, and in handling it we do not incur any risk on account of infringement of 
patents. 

Alabastine is ready for use by the addition of Cold Water, made so by the inventor, Mr. M. B. 
Church, who was the first to produce a cold water preparation that is thoroughly practical, that has 
superseded all hot water mixtures, and forced other manufacturers to UNDERTAKE the use of the 
cold water process. Then, again, Alabastine is made in Canada, by Canadian labor and from Canadian 
materials. It satisfies my customers. 

The trade supplied by Wholesale Hardware and Paint Dealers. Also by 

THE ALABASTINE CO., LIMITED, PARIS, ONT. 

THE INDEPENDENT CORDAGE CO., Limited, 

TORONTO. 

Highest Award Pan-American Exposition 

MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 

™\^ ROPE, Lath Yarn, Shingle Yarn, Hide Cord, BINDER TWINE 



Pulp Cord, Clothes Lines. 



Transmission Rope a specialty. 



SAW-SET 



ASK YOUR HARDWARE MERCHANT FOR IT 

TAKE NO OTHER. FAILING TO DO ITS 
WORK YOUR MONEY WILLBE RETURNED 



SELL GOODS THAT /WAKE 

YOUR CUSTOMERS HAPPY 

\ 

"English Steel Scythes' 1 
Champion Saw Tools- 
Axes, etc. 

R.Dillon, Oshawa. Ont. 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON-EJECTING. 



12 and 16 Gauges. 
Steel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
"Take 
Down" 
Gun Made. 




HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 

Also makers of H. & R. Revolvers, 

Catalog on request. Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



See lYou Don't 
Have to Pull. 
A Child Can Do It. 





[»IW.KE«5 SElFPUUCnl 



Nol5 



No 39 





(WALKERS UNIVERSAL 1 
\ SELF PULtlNG | J 



N0.I6 



Walker's Self=Pulling Cork Screws 

Made of Crucible Steel, Nickel Plated, Polished Apple Wood Handles. 
EVERY ONE TESTED AND GUARANTEED. Several imitations on the market, but none as good. 

mm. only by ERIE SPECIALTY CO., Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 



RICHARD JOHNSON, CLAPHAM & MORRIS UMITED - MANCHESTER 



Cable Address — "Metallicus," Manchester. 
Ccdes Used— ABC, AI, Liebers 
and Private Code. 

Manufacturers and 

GALVD SHEETS 
GALVD CANADAS 
BLACK SHEET IRON 
BLACK CANADAS 
Range & Furnace SHEETS 

MONTREAL OFFICE : 

Messrs. Copland & Co., 
Imperial Buildings. 




WAREHOUSE LEVER STREET 



and LIVERPOOL, ENG. 

Metal Merchants 

TINPLATES, TERNES 
TINNED SHEETS 
PIG TIN, PIG LEAD 
WIRE NETTING 
GALVD BARB WIRE 



HALIFAX OFFICE: 

Messrs. Grant, Oxley & Co. 
68 Bedford Row. 



After Stocktaking 

in the quiet time is the opportunity to equip wich 




Bennett's Patent Shelf Box 

Write for our new discount sheets containing 
lower prices and 7 varieties in Shelf Boxes. 

J. S. BENNETT, Patentee and Manufacturer, 

15 MARION ST., TORONTO 



GASOLINE MANTLES. 

5-lnch High-Pressure Gasoline Mantles 
that will stand being moved around. 

These Mantles we have made especially for 
Gasoline, and we can recommend them to our cus- 
tomers. We have actual tests of 600 candle 
power from high-pressure Gasoline Lamps using 
our 5-in. Mantles. 

We also manufacture the "United Gloria" Triple 
Weave Mantle and the "United" Single Weave. 

In these Mantles we use the best chemicals, and 
we stand behind our goods. 

SEND TOR PRICE LIST. 

THE UNITED INCANDESCENT LIGHT CO. 

Phone Main 969. ? Yonge St. Arcade, Toronto. 



STEVENS SINGLE BARREL SHOT GUN. 



LATEST AND 
BEST SINGLE 
GUN ON THE 
MARKET. 




MADE IN 
THREE STYLES 
THREE GAUGES 
UP-TO-DATE. 



!, 



FINEST SINGLE GUN YET PRODUCED. 

Our Goods are Handled by the Leading Jobbers. 

Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p 2i 7 ox Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. 






The Parcell Drop 
Lever Truck Scales 

Highly endorsed by Government 
Inspectors. 



Designed for Farm, Mill, Factory and 
Warehouse uses. Ask your wholesale 
Dealer for cuts and prices, or write 

AYLMER IRON WORKS CO., 



AYlMER, ont. 



Limited 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE SUCCESS of our 




D 



ERIAL OXFORD 



NGE 

ever since we put it on the market has been enormous. 

Its splendid construction and new patented features give 
it precedence over all others. 

THE FRONT DRAW-OUT GRATE 
DIFFUSIVE FLUE CONSTRUCTION 
DRAW-OUT OVEN RACK 

And other improvements, need only to be seen to 
be appreciated by your customers. 

If you haven't them in stock, better write for full 
information and price list and be ready for early spring 
business. 

There's steady demand for them all over Canada. 

THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO,, Limited 

TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 

THE QURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL. 





<£ Australasian <& 
Hardware and Machinery, 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
and Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 

post free to any part of the world. 



PUBLISHING OFFICES: 

Melbourne 
Sydney, 

AMERICAN OFFICES: 

New York, 

BRITISH OFFICES: 

London, - 



Fink's Buildings. 

Post Office Chambers, 

Park Row Building. 



- 43 Cannon St., E.C. 
Specimen Copies on application. 



THE TIME TO INSURE IS 



NOW 



While you arc WELL. STRONG and INSURABLE. 



THE 



Confederation 
Life 

ASSOCIATION issues policies on all approved plans 
of insurance, and is a prosperous and progressive 
Canadian Company. 

PROTECTION FOR YOUR FAMILY. 
PROFITABLE INVESTMENT FOR YOURSELF. 

Pamphlets and full information sent on application. 

Hon. Sir W. P, Howland, K.C.M.G,, C.B., 

PRESIDENT. 

W. H. Beatty, Esq., W. D. Matthews, Esq., 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

W. C. MACDONALD, J. K. MACDONALD, 

ACTUARY. MANAGING DIRECTOR. 



HEAD OFFICE. 



TORONTO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Grey and Bruce Portland 
Cement Company of Shallow 
Lake, Limited, 

Manufacturers of 
* "HERCULES" BRAND OF 

Portland Cement 

Unsurpassed for Sidewalks, Floors, and all 

work requiring the Highest Grade 

of Portland Cement. 

HEAD OFFICE : OWEN SOUND. 

There are twelve 
Axes that sell well 
in every dozen of 

DUNDAS 
AXES 

Wait for travel- 
lers with samples 
before placing your 
orders. 

Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont. 

W. L. Haldimand, Jr., Montreal, Agent. 




tattft 



1 Ctjilllliu Suiur; Will Push. 









l 

l 



MURALO 



THE HIGH-GRADE 

WALL FINISH 



VVVVVVW*W*\*VVVVVVV"WVVVVVVWVVWVV*VVW*VVW. 

Write to any of the agents mentioned below and get 
particulars of the latest and best in COLD WATER 
Wall Finish. Mixes easier, works easier, sells on a 
better reputation than any other Wall Finish in the 
world. Manufactured by THE MURALO CO., 
in NEW YORK, the largest producers in the world 
of cold water goods. 
■vvwvwvww wvwwwv ■wvwwwvwwwwvwww 

Agents : 
A. RAMSAY £> SON, - MONTREAL 

J. EI.ASI1DOWN, - WINNIPEG 

Mclennan, mceeely & co., - Vancouver 



IMPROVED STEEL WIRE TRACE CHAINS. 

Every chain guaranteed. Most profitable and satisfactory chain to handle. 




Improved Quality for 1902. 

THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., limited 

HAMILTON, ONT., AND MONTREAL, QUE. 



ESTABLISHED 1843. 



riE 



Hamilton, 



Toronto, 



INCORPORATED 1893. 



Gurney-Tilden Co., 



.(HIVED 



Montreal, 



AGENCIES :— SAINT JOHN, N. B., VANCOUVER, B. C. 






MANUFACTURERS 
OF 



LOCKS and BUILDERS' HARDWARE 



OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION. 



Horizontal Rim Knob 
Latches, 

Horizontal Rim Night 
Latches, 

Horizontal Rim Tubular 
Night Latches, 

Horizontal Cylinder Rim 
Night Latches, 

Horizontal Rim Knob 
Locks, 



Upright Rim Knob Locks 

(Plain and Ornamental), 

Horizontal Rim Knob 
Locks, 

Horizontal Rim Dead 
Locks, 

Upright Rim Store Door 
Dead Locks, 



Upright Cylinder Rim 
Dead Locks, 

Mortise Knob Latches, 

Mortise Night Latches, 

Mortise Dead Locks, 

Mortise Store Door Lock, 



and with many styles of Door Sets, the newest designs in Bronze and 
Brass Knobs and Escutcheons 




CAN BE HAD BY ANY DEALER 



Catalogues, Prices and Discount Sheets for ?hf h ask!ng" 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BURMAN & SONS' cuppers 

^j^zi BIRMINGHAM, ENG. S'.VSZKZ 




NO. 297. 



NO. 3— POWER CLIPPER, with "Wrist Joint. 

rThe Czar of Kussia. 
As supplied to-j The King of Denmark. 
(Earl Roberts, Etc., Etc. 





THE "LEOPOLD" TOILET. 



THE "WARWICK" 

CLIPPER. 

Cuts over three teeth. 

As supplied to 

His Majesty's 
War Department. 



SEND FOR PRICE LIST AND TERMS. 

To be obtained from all the principal Jobbers throughout 
the Dominion. 



IF WE DIDN'T 
BELIEVE 



all we have said about *> 

Cosmopolitan Incandescent 
Gas Lamps and Mantles 

we would stop advertising them 
altogether. It is because we be- 
lieve them to be 

THE VERY BEST 

that we are anxious to have every 
dealer try them. We can give you 

VERY CLOSE PRICES 

on these lights too. 
These mantles at manu- 
facturers' prices. 

We are the only Canadian jobbers 
for the well-known 

ROCHESTER LAMPS 

which for oil have no equal. 

FULL STOCK OF THESE O.OODS ALWAYS ON HAND. 

THE ROCHESTER LAMP GO. OF CANADA 

24 Front St. West, TORONTO. 




Supplies for the Maple Syrup Season 



Sap Buckets. 



Extra deep and straight. Three sizes. They possess many advantages over the ordinary flar- 
ing Buckets; being small in diameter they do not catch the rain or snow, and, as they are very 
deep, they hang perpendicularly and consequently will not overflow until full. Covers sup- 
plied if required. They nest close for shipping or storing. 

We can also supply the ordinary Flaring or Western Sap Pails. 

E. T. Sap Spouts. 

Made of Retinned Steel. Strong and durable. Only require a J^-in. hole in tree. It does 
not cover the inside surface of the hole, therefore a larger amount of sap is obtained. 
Packed in cardboard boxes. 

Maple Leaf Sap Spouts. 

Made in Bronzed Steel. Require a K-in. hole. Has a shoulder which prevents it being 
driven in too far. The hole in the tree is not exposed to wind and snow, consequently sap will 
flow longer. Packed in cardboard boxes. 





Syrup Cans. R oun d 



or Square. 



Plain or Decorated. Made in yi , X A and 1-gallon sizes— either Wine or Imperial measure. 




A FULL STOCK CARRIED IN ALL LINES. ORDERS SHIPPED PROHPTLY. 



KEMP MANUFACTURING COY, 



Toronto, Canada. 




VOL. XIV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, FEBRUARY 8, 1902. 



NO. 6. 



President : 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. 

rhe MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 



Montreal - 
Toronto 
London, Eng. 
Manchester, Eng 
Winnipeg 
Vancouver, B.C. 
St, John, N.B. - 
New York 



offices, 

- 232 McGill Street. 
Telephone 1255. 

10 Front Street East. 

Telephone 2701. 

log Fleet Street, E.C. 

W. H, Miln. 

- 18 St. Ann Street. 
H S. Ashburner. 

- Western Canada Block. 

J.J. Roberts. 

Flack Block. 

J. A. Macdonald. 

No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 

Room 442 New York Life Bldg. 



Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s. 
Published every Saturday. 
Cable Address J Adscript, London. 



■WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE MENTION THAT YOU SAW 



THEIR ADVERTISEMENT IN THIS PAPER 



LOWER PRICES ON PARIS GREEN. 

THE price of parts green as quoted by 
the different wholesale houses in 
Toronto shows an unusually wide 
range at present. While some houses claim 
r to be still quoting the old figures, there are 
others whose figures are 2c. per lb. below 
them. At the reduced figures i-lb. 
packages are being quoted at i6^c. instead 
of i8j£c. as formerly, pe roleum casks at 
I4^c. and arsenic kegs at 15c. 

As far as we can learn the reduction is 
due to the importation of paris green of 
both British and United States manufacture. 



The bulk of the orders^ for paris green for 
the coming season appear to have been 
placed, but as buyers were guaranteed 
prices they will, of course, lose nothing by 
the decline. 

Although the price of paris green is weak 
on the Canadian market, in the United 
States the conditions are the opposite. Iron 
Age, in its issue of January 30, says : 
"The demand for paris green has begun 
exceptionally early this season, and for the 
past two weeks has been quite large. For 
the last two years buyers have been reluc- 
tant to come into the market early, so that 
their readiness to buy at this time is the 
more marked. The quantity of green 
already ordered is accounted for by the 
small amount carried over from last season; 
also by the large planting of potatoes which 
is anticipated as a result of the high price 
of last year's crop. There is no price 
agreement among manufacturers, which 
results in a variety of quotations, ranging 
from a base price of \o% to 12c. per lb. 
Some makers charge }ic. advance over 
ton prices for smaller lots. The view is 
expressed that prices will go higher." 

The import duty on paris green is a 
moderate one, being only 10 per cent.; but 
the standard of quality demanded by the 
Government is high, and it would be well 
for dealers to assure themselves that with 
the price they are getting quality. 

All the paris green imported comes from 

the United States and Great Britain, and 

the quantity brought into the country during 

the last three years was as follows : 

1899. 1900. 1901. 

Great Britain, lb . . . .231,963 211,051 270,226 
United States, lb ... . 924 93,082 64,947 



A GOOD SCHEME. 

A COMMUNICATION has been sent to 
the Canadian Manufacturers' Asso- 
ciation by Mr. H. C. MacLean, of 
Toronto, suggesting the consideration of a 
scheme for advertising Toronto in the 
Southern States as a summer resort. 

" If the Manufacturers' Association were 
to go into it intelligently," says Mr. Mac- 
Lean, "and devise some scheme properly 
systematized and managed, they could raise 
$25,000 for the purpose without difficulty." 

The idea is a good one, and should 
receive the consideration it deserves. 
The tourist question is large enough and 
important enough to warrant the Associa- 
tion applying its energies to advertising not 
only Toronto, but other cities as well, in 
which it has branches. In furtherance of 
the scheme, the cooperation of the railways 
and steamboat companies could also be 
sought, and, no doubt, it would be obtained. 

The attractions of Canada as a summer 
resort for residents of the South are not 
unknown. Yearly they are becoming better 
known, but there is still a great deal of 
room for improvement. This can only be 
done by liberal and legitimate advertising 
schemes, and there is no organization that 
is better qualified than the Canadian Manu- 
facturers' Association to take the initiative 
in the matter. 



It is an evidence that they are renewing 
their youth when old firms inaugurate a 
vigorous and judicious policy in regard to 
advertising. 

THE LEAVEN OF BUSINESS. 

Advertising is the little leaven which 
raises the business to a place of promin- 
ence and a condition of prosperity. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE WARLIKE MR. FOSTER. 



HON. GEORGE E. FOSTER declared 
the other night during a speech 
which he made at the National 
Club, Toronto, on the occasion of the 
banquet to Mr. Edgar Wills, that he would 
like to see the people of the British Empire 
roll up their sleeves and give the com- 
mercially hostile nations a taste of com- 
mercial war. 

Mr. Foster was for several years Finance 
Minister of the Dominion. On the whole, 
he was an able Minister. We do not 
know that we have had any better. But 
after all his experience in that capacity, the 
irresponsibility of the professional politician 
seems to occasionally exhibit itself. A 
business man with a stake in the country 
would not have talked in the militant spirit 
that Mr. Foster did. Commercial warfare 
is no more a plaything than physical war- 
fare. Like it, destruction accompanies it 
and serious losses are entailed on both 
sides. It is unworthy of Mr. Foster to 
talk of liking to see the British Empire 
wage a commercial warfare. 

The instrument by which he would wage 
a commercial warfare is, of course, the 
tariff. Now, there is no one in Canada that 
knows more about tariffs than Mr. Foster. 
When framing the tariffs which obtained 
under his regime he, no doubt, had in mind 
the welfare of Canada, and did the very 
best he could as far as his light went. Hon. 
W. S. Fielding was, no doubt, actuated by 
the same spirit. The tariff that exists to- 
day, like the last that Mr. Foster brought 
down, could be improved upon, and, no 
doubt, will be in time, but surely Mr. 
Foster would not have us believe that the 
proper way to improve it is to turn it into an 
engine of commercial warfare. 

Mr. A. E. Ames, the president of the 
Toronto Board of Trade, who followed Mr. 
Foster, entirely disapproved of the latter' s 
sentiments. "We are big enough, or 
should be big enough, to stand on our own 
basis," declared Mr. Ames. In other 
words, Mr. Ames would have us work out 
our own commercial salvation without 
bothering ourselves as to the methods ob- 
taining in other lands. Mr. Foster, on the 
other hand, would declare a commercial 



warfare against foreign countries whose 
fiscal policy met with his disapproval. 

Mr. Foster is not the only one in Canada 
who is demanding commercial warfare. 
Before those militant spirits go any farther 
we would advise them to first sit down, and, 
like the king in Holy Writ, consider the 
costs and the possibilities. And as a 
preliminary, take the tariff in one hand and 
the Trade and Navigation Returns in the 
other. 



Coming east of the Rockies, it is a well- 
known fact that on the ranches in the 
Calgary district cattle are able to remain 
out on the prairie all winter. 

Taking either the winter or the summer 
seasons, Canada has one of the most 
glorious and bracing climates in the world. 



FEATURES OF CANADIAN WINTERS. 

THERE is scarcely anything in regard 
to Canada that is more misunderstood 
in Europe than its climate. To a 
great many, Canada is a land of snow. It 
is true that in certain parts of the country 
the winters are cold and snow is present for 
three or four months. On January 3, for 
example, the thermometer at Dawson, in 
the Yukon, registered a maximum tempera- 
ture of 28 deg. below zero, and at Winnipeg 
it was the same. But even in these places 
the climate is so dry and the conditions for 
withstanding the cold so ample that incon- 
venience is seldom experienced. 

The climatic conditions at those points 
are not, however, representative by any 
means of the climatic conditions ruling in 
Canada during the winter months. In 
Halifax, on the Atlantic coast, the ther- 
mometer, on January 3, was only 4 deg. 
below freeezing point, while at Victoria, on 
the Pacific coast, the temperature did not 
come within 4 deg. of freezing point, while 
in Toronto, where not one man in a dozen 
wears a fur cap during the winter months, 
there were 10 to 20 degrees of frost. 

Snow on the Pacific Coast of Canada is a 
rare thing. On January 23rd last there was 
a snowstorm in that part of the country, 
the first for a year, and such an unusual 
thing was it that the newspapers came out 
the next day with flaring headlines, one of 
which read: "A Rare Show Visitant." At 
Christmas time flowers are blooming in the 
gardens of Victoria, British Columbia, and 
a copy of The Victoria Colonist of January 
24 announces that one of the local grocery 
firms has received two pounds of straw- 
berries grown in the open air at Saanich, a 
short distance north oi the Provincial capital. 



THE COLLINGWOOD STEEL PLANT. 

AS soon as the weather is favorable 
the buildings under construction 
for The Cramp Steel Co. at 
Collingwood, Ont., are to be completed and 
a steel plant installed having a daily capa- 
city of 600 tons. The company will manu- 
facture girders, beams and rails in addition 
to merchant bar and billets. Considerable 
work will be provided for this steel plant by 
the acquisition of the Canada Atlantic and 
other Canadian roads by Dr. Stewart Webb 
and his associates. Dr. Webb is one of the 
directors of this steel company. 

The buildings that are under construction 
for the steel plant are to be entirely of stone 
and steel. The plant will consist of a 
Bessemer converting plant equipped with 
two 7-ton converters, three cupolas for 
melting pig iron, mixers, blowing engines, 
hydraulic pumps and cranes complete. The 
total output of the converting plant will be 
600 tons of acid steel daily, and the two 
open-hearth steel furnaces will have a 
minimum capacity of 100 tons of basic steel 
daily. The latter will be equipped with 
gas-producers and cranes of most modern 
design. 

The open-hearth and the Bessemer plants 
are each in separate steel buildings, each 
100 x 100 feet. They will be supplied with 
all accessories, such as bottom ovens, 
grinders, and an electric plant installed in 
an adjoining building. The pit-house will 
be built of stone, 70 x 70 by 30 feet high, 
and is an extension of the blooming build- 
ing. The ingots will be rolled into 4x4 
billets by a blooming train after they are 
taken from the soaking pits. These billets 
will be cut into suitable lengths by a massive 
hydraulic shear at the end of the blooming 
main tables. The plant will be one of the 
most modern and up to date on the Ameri- 
can continent. v 

Twelve tubular boilers in a separate 
building, will supply the motive power. 

The ore will be obtained from the mines 
of the company to a great extent. One of 
these at Sundridge is very promising. The 
ore is of Bessemer grade and a diamond 
drill will be put on in the spring. Ores from 
Lake Superior will probably supplement the 
ore from this mine. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



ANNUAL MEETINGS OF BOARDS OF TRADE. 



THE MONTREAL BOARD. 

THERE was a large attendance of 
members at the annual meeting' of 
the Montreal Board of Trade 
which was held on January 28 to elect 
officers for the coming- year and to re- 
ceive the report of Mr. Henry Mil'-*, the 
retiring president. 

In his address Mr. Miles touched on the 
position created by the disastrous fire 
and the difficulties and responsibilities 
created by it. He then touched on the 
transportation problem, which he said 
was the most important question of our 
day. The Parliament and Government is 
in sympathy with the progress they 
desire, which is none other than the ac- 
knowledgment of Montreal as the nation- 
al port of the Dominion. He referred to 
the Hon. J. I. Tarte's letter on the sub- 
ject, which he believed had fully grasped 
the situation. The difficulty at present 
exists, not with the railways, but with 
our waterways, harbors and inland ton- 
nage. Our transportation facilities are 
unequal to the requirements of to-day. 
Our lethargy is serving- to build up tin- 
Atlantic ports of the United States. To 
accomplish anything our business men 
should be united. In this way they would 
strengthen the hands of the public men 
who are willing- to deal with this great 
question. The position also in regard to 
the equipment of the harbor was unsatis- 
factory. Difficulties and content ions 
should be put aside and the work pushed 
forward. The possible consolidation of 
the ocean liners with the land carriers in 
the United States was a menace to the 
St. Lawrence trade. The present condi- 
tions of the route required the greatest 
energy towards securing every improve- 
ment possible. He was pleased that they 
had strong prospects of having- the next 
meeting of the Chambers of Commerce of 
the Empire at Montreal. The extension 
of the telegraph system to Belle Isle has 
been accomplished. The Marconi system 
is now being made use of in a limited 
way, and he hoped that it might be more 
extended. Its establishment would be an 
additional safeguard to navigation. The 
fire-insurance situation is unchanged. 
About a year ago the rates had been 
enormously advanced. This position, in 
the opinion of experts, can only be recti- 
'"fied by the expenditure of $300,000 in im- 
proving the fire protection of the city. 
And until the city has money to meet the 
expenses, and the city council reorg'aniz»s 
the fire brigade, the high rates will con- 
tinue. The want of a new Customs ex- 
amining warehouse was also noted. The 
business of the port warrants the request 
for a new building. He was pleased to 
announce the completion of the contract 
for the construction of a new fireproof 



home for the board. They had made an 
excellent bargain with the contractors. 
The cost of the new building will be 
*435.,000. The estimated amount of the 
salvage was $60,000, and the amount of 
the contract was $375,000, which made up 
that figure. He concluded by offering- 
testimony fo the valuable services of the 
secretary. Mr. George Hadrill, whom he 
said had ever the Board's interest at 
heart. 

The scrutineers, on the following day, 
reported at the adjourned meeting that 
these officers were elected : 

President — Mr. Alex. McFee, representing the 
grain trade. 

First vice-president — Mr. Arthur J- Hodgson, 
dairy produce. 

Second vice-president — Mr. Geo. E. Drummond, 
iron. 

Treasurer — Mr. Robert Munro, paints and oils, 
by acclamation. 

Members of council — Messrs. James Thorn, 
shipping; T. F. How, banking; W. W. Watson, 
sugar ; James Davidson, stamped and enamelled 
ware; G. B. Fraser, dry goods; J. C. Holden, 
boots and shoes ; P. W. McLagan, dairy produce; 
H. D. Metcalfe, grain; Hugh Watson, wallpaper; 
John J. McGill, rubber manufactures; Cornelius 
Coughlin, live stock, and R. McD. Paterson, fire 
insurance. 

Board of arbitration — Messrs. E. B. Greenshields, 
Charles F. Smith, Robt. Reford, John McKergow, 
Robert Archer, James Crathern, Robert Bicker- 
dike, James P. Cleghorn, Hon. Robert Mackay, 
John Macfarlane, Henry Miles and R. W. 
Macdougall. 

After the newly-elected president took 
the chair, a hearty vote of thanks was 
accorded Mr. Miles, who gratefully ac- 
knowledged the same. 

Mr. Alex. McPhee was pleased with the 
honor conferred on him by his election 
to the presidential chair. He promised 
that he, together with the council, would 
continue the work carried on last year — 
the deepening of the river to a uniform 
depth of 30 feet, and the improvement of 
the aids of navigation from that port to 
the sea. During the past season no fewer 
than nine steamers were lost on the New- 
foundland Coast. Six of these belonged 
to the St. Lawrence trade. The council 
would do everything possible to remove 
the difficulties under which the St. Law- 
rence route labored. The council would 
also, as far as possible, further the ex- 
tension of trade on the canals. 

THE KENTVILLE, N P., BOARD 

At least 75 members were present at 
the annual meeting of the Kentville, N. 
S., Board of Trade, when Presihent Sealy 
presented his report of the past year's 
proceedings of that body. 

The committee on the fruit fair, which 
is to be held next fall, stated that they 
had secured the guarantee of the county 
council that in the event of there being 
a deficit the council would make one-half 
of it good. 

A committee consisting of B. H. Dodge, 
M.P.P., H. H. Wickwire, M.P.P. and R. 



S. Eaton were appointed to present the 
matter to the Provincial Government. In 
rel'crejice to the Government report a 
letter from Acting-Premier Longley was 
received. 

The Maritime winter fair, also was dis- 
cussed as were also better connections 
and larger circuit on the telephone lines, 
and a speedway near the town. In regard 
to the speedway it was pointed out that 
the leading market for horses had be- 
come centred in King's county, from 
which place the majority of the horses 
purchased for Africa had come. 

The election of officers for 1902 resulted 

as follows : 

President— A. E. Calkin. 
Vice-President — George E. Calkin. 
Secretary— F. C. Rand. 

BANQUET OF GUELPH BOARD OF TRADE. 

The Guelph Board of Trade held its 
third yearly banquet at the Wellington 
Hotel last Friday evening, January 31. 
Over 100 were present, including a num- 
ber of the business men of that city. A. 
F. H. Jones, the president of the board, 
performed the duties of chairman. On 
his right was the Hon. Geo. E. Foster, 
and on his left, A. E. Ames, President of 
the Toronto Board of Trade. E. R. 
Bollert occupied the vice-chair. When the 
menu had been disposed of and the toast 
of " The King " honored, the chairman 
followed in a short address. He recom- 
mended the formation of a Provincial 
board of trade composed of one or more 
members of the various boards of trade 
throughout the Province. They could 
meet once a year in Toronto, about the 
same time as the Legislature was in 
session, and discuss matters of trade. 
The great prosperity of the country dur- 
ing the past few years., was also noted. 

" The House of Commons and the 
Legislature " was propsed by E. R. 
Bollert. 

A. Guthrie, M.P., replied oil behalf of 
the Commons. He was enthusiastically 
cheered. He had heard regret on all 
sides expressed that Mr. Foster was no 
longer a member. His ability made him 
of great service to his country. The press 
of both parties were apt to traduce any- 
one who were trying to do his duty. He 
was pleased at the healthy state of trade 
in Canada. We should have freer trade 
and fairer trade. He believed that the 
Mother Country in the east should be 
more looked to than the country to the 
south. 

Lieut. -Col. Mutrie, M.P.P., was a stout 
opponent of the bonusing system. He 
believed only in helping old-established 
manufactories, which might have suffered 
from fire. 

The toast of " Canada " was received 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



by the singing of " The Maple Leaf." As 
it was coupled with the name of the 
Hon. Geo. E. Foster, he rose amidst 
cheers to respond. We should have con- 
fidence in our country ; we also should 
have confidence in ourselves, he declared. 
On- us rests the responsibility of making 
Canada one of the greatest nations in 
the world. We have laid the foundations 
successfully and now had to follow a 
straight road. 

A. E. Ames, President of the Toronto 
Board of Trade followed with a very 
practical speech. He believed in the 
country. The young men should advance 
in the footsteps of their fathers, and go 
beyond them. 

The toast " Sister Boards of Trade " 
was also responded to by a number of 
others, as was also that of " The Agri- 
cultural Interests," to which Professor 
Reynolds responded. The other toasts 
were the " Manufacturing ' and Commer- 
cial Interests " and " The City and Coun- 
try Interests." The last-named was re- 
sponded to by the Mayor Of Guelph. 



STOVE PRICES HIGHER IN THE 
STATES. 

THK Western stove manufacturers 
have advanced the price of steel 
ranges 10 per cent., and of cast 
ranges 5 per cent . As far as known the 
advance on heaters has not been definitely 
settled, and the new price on these goods 
may not be fixed until nearer the time 
when orders will begin to be placed for 
next season's trade. It is not expected 
that much will be done in the sale of 
heaters the remainder of this winter, as 
the trade is undoubtedly pretty well sup- 
plied. Such sales as occur are of a scat- 
tering character, and usually represent 
the wants of some belated buyer con- 
fronted by an emergency which compels 
him to purchase a stove. 

The advance made in cooking goods is 
stated to have been received by the deal- 
ers without much objection. They recog- 
nize the fact that costs have advanced, 
as they are familiar with the high prices 
now ruling on the materials from which 
ranges are made. The demand is not 
heavy at present, but both in Chicago 
and in ihe rural districts tributary to 
the city a fair amount of business is 
doing, which is fully up to the usual 
movement at this time of the year. Some 
of the stove houses are reporting a bet- 
ter trade than they enjoyed at the corre- 
sponding time last year. All branches of 
business are in such good condition that 
wage-earners are well employed and 
families are consequently seeking houses 
for which they must have furniture. — 
Metal Worker. 



Scott & Welsh, general merchants, 
Moorfield. Ont., have sold their stock to. A, 
S. Scott & Co. 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES. 

L. A. Frechette, general merchant, 
Thetford Mines, Que., has assigned. 

Kent & Turcotte are the curators of J. C. 
Giroux, general merchant, Berthier, Que. 

Binns & Thompson, general merchants, 
Ucluelet, B.C., have assigned to James E. 
Sutton. 

Anthime Jolicoeur is curator of the estate 
of Pierre A. Pigeon, builder, Delorimer, 
Que. 

Thomas Clement, blacksmith, Dobbing- 
ton, Ont., has assigned to James Douglas, 
Chesley. 

P. J. Kyte, general merchant, St. Peter's, 
N.S., is offering to compromise at 50c. on 
the dollar. 

H. A. Lalonde, general merchant, 
Riviere Beaudette, Que., is offering 25c. on 
the dollar. 

L. M. A. Lemieux & Co., general mer- 
chants, Marbleton, Que., have assigned to 
J. R. Roger. 

A petition for the winding up of The 
Diamond Lighting Co., Limited, Montreal, 
has been presented. 

The creditors of Black & Ross, general 
merchants, Thetford Mines, Que., held a 
meeting on February 4. 

J. A. Milligan, general merchant, Mid- 
land, Ont., has assigned to Duncan Storey. 
Creditors will meet to-day. 

A meeting of the creditors of James B. 
Hay, florist and seed merchant, Brantford, 
Ont., has been called for February 8. 

Syndicate de Ste. Marie, general 
merchants, St. Marie, Beauce county, 
Que., has assigned to Alfred Leimeux. 

The Electric Cab Co., Limited, Toronto, 
has assigned to J. P. Langley. A meeting 
of creditors will be held on February 10. 

A. Desmarteau is curator of Joseph 
Cousineau, coal and wood merchant, 
Montreal. His creditors had a meeting on 
February 6. 

Lacourse & Le Francois, general mer- 
chants, Shawenegan Falls, Que., have con- 
sented to assign^ A meeting of creditors 
has been called for February 8. 

M. S. Houle, general merchant, St. 
Boniface and Letellier. Man., has assigned 
to C. H. Newton, Winnipeg. A meeting of 
creditors has been called for February 11. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Dufresne & Pratt, hardware merchants, 
Montreal, have dissolved. 

Mistele & Schmidt, hardware merchants, 
Rodney, Ont., have dissolved. D. Mistele 
continues. 

Frothingham & Workman, wholesale 
hardware merchants, Montreal, have dis- 
solved, and a new partnership has been 
registered. 



The Spencer Island Co., lumber mer- 
chants, Spencer Island, N.S., have dis- 
solved. 

Ironsides & Knight, carriagemakers, 
Ilderton.Ont., have dissolved; J. H. Knight 
continues. 

Carrier & Sabbe, carriagemakers, St. 
Francois Xavier De Brompton, Que., have 
dissolved. 

Halstead & Quick, sawmill owners, 
Hanover, Ont., have dissolved. T. R. 
Quick continues. 

Fetterly, Fulton & Allison, general 
merchants, Chesterville, Ont., are advertis- 
ing as dissolving. 

W. R. Calder & Son, lumber merchants, 
Tupperville, N.S., have dissolved. Hugh 
A. Calder continues. 

Wm. and David Mitchell and J. Patrick 
have registered as partners in The Maritime 
Coal Co., Maccan, N.S. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

The Hodgson Iron and Tube Co., 
Montreal, has obtained a charter. 

The assets of J. A. Duval, hardware 
merchant, Montreal, have been sold. 

The Peterboro' Peat Co , Limited, Peter - 
boro', Ont., have obtained a charter. 

The Lake Superior Timber Co., Limited, 
Windsor, Ont., has obtained a charter. 

The assets of B. Simon, general merchant, 
Greenfield, Ont., are to be sold on February 
10. 

N. T. Carey, general merchant, Otter- 
burne, Man., is advertising his business for 
sale. 

The assets of M. Ormstein & Co., general 
merchants, St. Polycarpe, Que., are to be 
sold. 

The assets of B. Simon & Co., general 
merchants, Vankleek Hill, Ont., are to be 
sold on February 10. 

The Sault Gray Copper Co., Limited, 
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., have obtained a 
charter. 

The Beauharnois Light, Heat and Power 
Co., Beauharnois, Que., has applied for a 
charter. 

The estate of Malcolm R. Gillespie, 
general merchant, Balmoral, Ont., was 

WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



advertised for sale by auction on Febru- 
ary 6. 

P. E. Ruel & Cie, painters, etc., Mont- 
real, have registered. 

Lewis Jones, general merchant, Exeter, 
Ont., has sold to L. Lanning. 

flhe Walker Oil Co., Limited, Winnipeg, 
is applying for incorporation. 

R. W. Williams is successor to Lincoln 
& Williams, tinsmiths, Yarmouth, N.S. 

Nathan Brenner, dealer in scrap iron, 

etc., Toronto, has sold out to Katie Brenner. 

The R. E. T. Piingle Co., Limited, 

electric supplies, Montreal, has obtained a 

charter. 

Annie E. Smith, general merchant, Fort 
Rowan, Ont., is succeeded by Darby & 
Yokum. 

R. H. Benson & Co., general merchants, 
Indian Head, N.W.T., are giving up busi- 
ness there. 

Mrs. Ruben Rafalovitch has registered 
for B. Simon & Co., stove merchants, 
Montreal. 

W. J, T. Trudel has registered for Trudel 
& Moore, wood and coal merchants, 
Montreal. 

W. B. Martin, agricultural implements, 
Shoal Lake, Man., has sold out to Eakins 
& Griffin. 

Labbe & Lemay, lumber merchants, St. 
Francois Xavier De Brompton, Que., have 
registered. 

Maxwell & Bowes, agricultural implement 
agents, Pilot Mound, Man., have sold out 
to G. Elliott. 

The Heaslip & Lawton Co., Limited, 
agricultural implements, Alameda, N.W.T., 
have been incorporated. 

A. R. Williams & Co., machinery manu- 
facturers, Montreal, have changed their 
style to Williams & Wilson. 

E. J. Brooks & Co., general merchants, 
Indian Head, N.W.T., have sold their 
Kenlis branch to A. O. Brooks & Co. 

Supplementary letters have been issued 
increasing the capital of The Dominion 
Wire Manfg. Co., Limited, Montreal, to 
$1,000,000. 

Joseph Wheatley, blacksmith and general 
merchant, Harlock, Ont., has sold out to 
Frederick Argent, who takes possession 
during March, 1902. 

Supplementary letters have been issued 
^increasing the capital of The St. Lawrence 
and Chicago Steam Navigation Co .Limited, 
Montreal, to #500,000. 

FIRES. 

C. S. Botsford, general merchant, 
Uxbridge, Ont., has been burned out. 

E. T. Thompson, agricultural implement 
merchant, Uxbridge, Ont., has suffered 
some loss by fire. 

George Gale & Sons, manufacturers of 



The Four Factors 

that bring success to S.-W.P. Agents are 

S.-W.P. Methods, 
S.-W.P. System, 
5. - W.P. Advertising, 
S.-W.P. Quality. 

With quality alone S.-W.P. can place any paint dealer 
at the head of the business in his locality, but we don't 
depend on quality alone. We back the quality up with 
methods, system, and advertising that insures success from 
the start. The combination can't be beat, and will win out 
against any competition, anywhere paint is sold. 

If you want to learn in detail about these four factors, 
send a postal card today for the " B-13 Booklet." It is 
full of valuable information. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 




CHICAGO, 
NEW YORK, 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND. 

NEWARK, BOSTON, SAN FRANCISCO. 

MONTREAL, TORONIO, KANSAS CITY. 




iron beds, etc., Walkerville, Ont., were 
burned out. Their stock was insured. 

DEATHS. 

M. B. Lovell, of Lovell, Henry & Sons, 
lumber merchants, Coaticook, Que., is dead. 



A NEW REPRESENTATIVE. 

Mr. Fred S. Murdoch, who has repre- 
sented The Jas. Robertson Co., Limited, 
for the past eight years, succeeds the late 
Mr. Gabriel Crawford in travelling for The 
Canada Paint Co. in the Maritime Provinces. 
Mr. Murdoch is to be congratulated in 
representing this progressive company, who 
are the largest manufacturers in the Do- 
minion of Canada of paints, colors and 
varnishes. With four factories, The Can- 
ada Paint Co. is able to keep abreast of the 
times and to continually add new and 
taking features to their list of specialties. 
The company is no less fornunate in secur- 
ing the services of Mr. Murdoch, who has 
been for several years one of the most 
successful and popular members of the 
travelling fraternity. 



HARDWAREMEN ELECT OFFICERS. 

The hardware section of the Toronto 
Junction Branch of the Retail Merchants' 
Association held their annual meeting on 
Thursday evening, January 30, when the 
following officers were elected for 1902 : 

President — James Bond. 
1st Vice-President — E. Rogers. 
2nd Vice-President— J. E. C. Willard. 
Secretary — Thomas Padget. 
Treasurer — H. D. Snell. 

Delegates to Retail Merchants' Association — N. 
Raybould and A. Chisholm. 

The secretary's repoit showed a substan- 
tial balance in the treasury. The increased 
membership was also a cause of satisfaction 
to those present. 

The installation of officers will take place 
at their next meeting. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. H. Roper, representing Alexander 
Gibb, manufacturers' agent and metal 
broker, Montreal, was in Toronto on Thurs- 
day en route home from a business trip 
west. His trip was a successful one. 



CHANGE IN A HARDWARE FIRM. 

W. S. Rogers & Son, hardware, tinware 
and stove merchants, Glencoe, Ont., write 
to say that they have disposed of their busi- 
ness to Mr. T. E. Pool. They state : "In 
writing to you we cannot let the opportunity 
pass of stating how much benefit we 
received through the columns of your well- 
edited journal. We always found plenty to 
interest us, not only as to the current 
changes in prices of goods, but in the 
general reading matter. We wish you con- 
tinued success in your efforts." 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY. 

SOME years ago, when I was assis- 
tant to the local electrician of 
the British Government, I ventured 
to lecture at Hope Hall, Liverpool, upon 
electricity. At the close of the lecture 
the audience was invited to ask any 
questions they might see fit. After a 
short, but apparently interesting discus 
sion, one man created a flutter by ask- 
ing- if I was aware that it was possible 
to telegraph without wires. As this was 
my " first appearance," as the news- 
papers put it, " on any stage," I was, I 
must admit, disconcerted for a moment: 
The listeners thought the question ridi- 
culous and commenced to " guy " the 
anxious inquirer most unmercifully. When 
calm was restored, I confessed my ignor- 
ance, but reminded the audience that the 
spark from the Leyden jar was wireless 
telegraphy, as also was induction or in- 
duced currents, the transfer of an elec- 
tric or magnetic state from an electrified 
body to a non-electrified by proximity 
without contact. Again I mentioned that 
telegraphy had been possible using a 
river or body of water as a conductor. 

Shortly after this, experiments were 
carried on, if 1 remember rightly, be 
tween the north coast of Devon and 
Lundy island in the Bristol channel. 
Since then, as is widely known, the dis- 
tance in which successful and intelligible* 
signals have been transmitted without 
wires is ever widening, and 1 simply 
write this to endeavor to show that the 
system is not the dream of a day, but 
the outcome of careful, prolonged and 
scientific experiments, and we should bear 
in mind that it took 20 years to brine 
that marvel of electrical adaptation, the 
Bell telephone, to its present stage of 
perfection, and all honor is due to Mar- 
coni for his last great achievement of 
signalling across the Atlantic. 

One must remember an extraordinary 
development that is taking place in mat- 
ters electrical and the mode of employ- 
ing and distributing that which we know, 
as Lord Kelvin puts it, " nothing about,"' 
may be completely revolutionized within 
a very short time. — William H. Evans, of 
The Canada Paint Company. ,in The 
Montreal Gazette. 



A NEW IMPLEMENT FIRM. 

The Heaslip-Lawton Co., Limited, is a 
new firm that has been incorporated at 
Alameda. N.W.T., as dealers in all kinds 
of farm implements, threshing machines, 
pianos, organs, and sewing machines. .1 . 
J. Heaslip is the head of the firm. He 
has been in that district for over 13 
years in the implement business, besides 
conducting a hardware and undertakin 
establishment for several years. W. E. 
Lawton, also connected with this firm, 
has been in the same business for up- 
wards of nine years, first with The Mas- 
sey-Harris Co., Limited, Toronto, travel- 
ling for them in Ontario. Later, he has 
sold for The Cockshutt Plow Co., of 
Brantford, Out., in the west. The third 
partner, George Heaslip, has been con- 
nected with a harness shop and wood- 
working shop at Alameda, for some time. 



IVER JOHNSON BICYCLES 

NEWEST AND LATEST TRUSS FRAME 



The Truss frame 
satisfies that 
longing for 
something new 
and good in a 
bicycle — it pos- 
sesses the ad- 
vantage of rac- 
ing weight and 
roadster strength 
-a rigid crank 
hanger— greater 
speed— no buck- 
ling of frame — 
Made of one- 
inch Tubing. 



Agents wanted 
in unoccupied 
territory ; send 

for new catalog 

just issued. 




(FRAME PATENTED.) 



New York Salesroom— 

90 Chambers Street 



IVER JOHNSONS ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 

' — FITCHBURG, MASS., U.S.A. 



Zanzibar Paints 

We do not say " there are no other good paints " ; we do not have to sell 
our paints in that way, but we do say ZANZIBAR PAINTS 

in point of service and appearance are unequalled. Do you carry them in 
stock? You should. Write for our "Terse Talks." 



THE ZANZIBAR PAINT CO., Limited 



Toronto, Can. 




Page 



Metal Ornamental Fence. Wen °™ ake 



fence that is 
; ornamental, very showy and surprisingly cheap. It is just what 
is wanted for door yards, division fences in town lots, grave 

iSedTnd^etans'at'U 20 C,S " PER RUNNING F00T - 

Just think of it. Let us send you full particulars. We also 
make farm fence, poultry netting, nails ana staples. 

The Page Wire Fence Co., Limited, Walkervllle, Ont. S 



STANYON ENGINEERING CO. 



Phone Main 2177. 



402 MCKINNON BUILDING, 



TORONTO 



CONTRACTING AND CONSULTING ENGINEERS. 

Steel Works, all kinds of Rolling Mills, Wire Mills, etc., all built complete. Machinery designed for any purpose. 
General Offices, - - PITTSBURG, Pa. 



When your customers ask about 

FENCE 

remember that the most satisfac- 
tory as well as the cheapest fence 
is the one built on the ground 
with a London Fence Machine 
and Fencing Supplies made by 

THE LONDON FENCE MACHINE CO., 




Limited. 



Manufacturers and jobbers in everything in up-to-date farm Fencing. 



LONDON, ONTARIO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 




D 
I 

S 
S 
T 

N 



DISS 



IN 



Henry 



DISSTON 




& Sons 



PHILADELPHIA, PENN., U.S.A. 



FILES. 



RASPS. 



I 



■r 




THE POPULARITY 0F= ~ 

THE DISSTON FILES IS ATTESTED BY THE 



MILL 



IONS SOLD ANNUALLY WITH 
EEEESALES STILL INCREASING. 



THE REPUTATION OF DISSTONS FILES:E=E C /"\l IADC 

HAS BEEN CONSTANTLY MAINTAINED BY OVUHKb 



AND HONEST METHODS IN THEIR 
MAN UFACTURE. 



D 
I 

S 
S 
T 

N 



'*" I' Ulr 1 



~QjX^ 




A PARTICULAR FARRIER PREFERS THE DISSTON' HORSE RASP " ' S ""' BEST IN ALL PARTICULARS - 



D 
I 

S 
S 
T 

N 



I 




A CUSTOMER ASKING FOR DISSTONSE 
WILL ACCEPT NO OTHERE 



IT PAYS TO HAVE DISSTONS ON 



,____. TO BE WITHOUT DISSTONS MEANS 
UUMn TO LET THE TRADE GO 



ETO YOUR COMPETITOR. 



I " ^,mmL . a 

IMITATION IS THE SINCEREST F|„AT TERY - GET THE GENUINE - LOOK FOR THE STAMP. 




Lewis BroS £» Co 




WHOLESALE 
AGENTS 



MONTREAL. 



DISSTON 



D 
I 

S 
S 
T 

N 




16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



NOVA SCOTIA MARKETS. 

Halifax, February 3, 1902. 

BRADSTREET'S weekly review of 
Canadian trade, on Saturday, said 
of Halifax : "Cold weather stimu 
lated certain lines at Halifax, and travellers 
on the road are sending in good orders." 
The latter may fairly refer to the hardware 
trade, which has shown a good average 
with other years. The report adds : 
"Collections drag somewhat, and money is 
rather light, but prospects are good for an 

average winter's trade." 

* * * 

The bank clearings generally are an 
index of trade, and the same for Nova 
Scotia for the week ending January 30 are 
given at $1,586,663 54 as compared with 
$1,405,634.25 for the same period of last 
year, or a gain of 13.04 per cent. This 
statement is given by a reputed Halifax 
stock broker and may be considered as 
correct. Customs receipts for January fell 
from $100,000 in 1901 to $95,000 this year. 

* * * 

Imports of hardware are as yet not 
extensive, but in this list for the week may 
be mentioned 173,500 firebrick imported by 
the Livonian from Glasgow, over half of 
which quantity is for dealers in the city. 
This is the largest single shipment ever 
made to Halifax. A chemical engine, with 
hose and equipment, by steamer Silvia from 
New York, to Austin Bros. This engine is 
for the town of Sydney, which, since the 
late fire there, has seen the advisability of 
being fully equipped for any emergency. 
The Livonian also landed here 10,000 steel 

billets. 

* * # 

Last Thursday marked another important 
step in the rise of Sydney to the position of 
the " Pittsburg of Canada." On December 
30, 1 90 1, the first steel ingots were cast at 
the steel works at that place, and, on 
January 30, the first steel billets were rolled 
on the opening of the blooming mill. 
Saturday's despatches state that the general 
results and the working of the steel furnaces 
and blooming mill have far exceeded the 
most sanguine expectations of the officials. 

* * * 

Tha following is the reported statement 
of Superintendent Baker : " We made a 
perfect billet of steel without a single flaw 
at the first roll, and every roll since has 
been equally as good. In fact, the mill is 
working as steadily as if it had been oper- 
ated for years, and I have never seen finer 
steel blooms in all my experience in the 
best plants in the United States." This 
announcement means much for Canada, 

* * * 

There was quite a slump last week in 
stoves and stovepipe. In fitting up the 
concentration camp for the 2nd C.M.R.. 
some half-dozen expensive ranges had to 
be purchased, some 40 base burners, and 
considerably over a carload of stovepipe. 
At auction, on Saturday, the stovepipe was 
sold for the small sum of $6 ; $20 base- 
burners brought $5 to $6 by the dozen ; $30 
ranges sold for $10 to $12. Some of the 
dealers, however, were on hand, and every- 
thing was sold in large lots. RC.H. 



OVER 200 VARIETIES. 

We make over 200 varieties of Stove, Furnace and 
Grate Bricks, and can make as many more to order, if 
necessary. 

Large stock constantly on hand, and prompt shipment 
guaranteed. Write for list of Styles and Prices. 

JONES BROS., Bracondale, P.O. 

Sole Manufacturers of "Maple Leaf" Brand. 



Lace Leather 

Send direct to us for the celebrated 
" NIAGARA " Brand Lace Leather, best 
produced in this country. Yellow and 
White in Sides or Cut Strings. Prices and 
Samples on application. 

WOOD BROS. 

Tanners of High-Class Leathers, 
ST. CATHARINES, ONT. 



*6l/iK> fO-DAV YH^fJ, 

•DO YOtf? 

rt/etasemeett 
in the * 

COMTf^C'T- 
To f\ot4fo 

- will bring you, 

tendersfrem tkk 
' *//* ► -» fast cont radon? 



Buy the Best. 





HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by all Wholesale Dealers 



RADIANT SHELBY LAMP 




SHIFTY per cent, more useful 
* light from the same amount 
of current. 

For sale by all dealers In 
Electrical Supplies. 



The Ontario Lantern Co , 



WALTER GROSE, 

Selling Agent, 

Montreal. 



MANUFACTURERS, 

HAMILTON. 



lo Oven Builders, 

Etc. 

The Canadian Patent 
Rights of Prym's Patent 

Oven (patented in thirteen 
countries), which has the 
unique benefit of being 
evenly heated on all six 
sides at the same time, are 
offered for sale, and can be 
obtained by applying to 

J. CULBERT, 

4 Monkwell St. LONDON, E.C., ENG. 



THE LONDON SCALE WORKS 

GEORGE M. FOX 

(Successor to John Fox ) 

Manufacturer of Railroad, flay and 

Platform Scales. 

91 York Street, ■ LONDON, ONT. 



STANLEY RULE I LEVEL CO. 

NEW BRITAIN, CONN., U.S.A. 



IMPROVED CARPENTERS 1 
TOOLS. 



SOLD BY ALL HARDWARE 
DEALERS. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



\\fE have 
the nic- 
est set of Hose 
samples ever 
shown to the 
Canadian j* 
trade. Don't 
fail to see 
them. 



HOSE 

GARDEN 

STEAM 

SUCTION 

ETC. 

Send for samples and quotations. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



\\^E make 
Hose of 
all kinds for all 
purposes. Our 
equipment is 
the most mod- 
ern and our 
goods are per- 
fection. 



THE DURHAM RUBBER CO., limited 

Bowmanville, Ont. 



\A/E MANUFACTURE THE VERY BEST KINDS OF 

PAINT AND COLOR CANS 

VARNISH AND OIL CANS 

PAINT PACKAGES 

ROUND AND SQUARE PAINT IRONS 

LYE TINS 

Our goods are guaranteed to be reliable, and to give entire satisfaction. Quotations gladly submitted for any quantity. 

TIBIIE ^CIMIIE O^ZLnT ^WOEZIS 

Office and Factory : Ontario St. and Jeanne D'Arc Avenue. 
Jas B. Campbell. MONTREAL. William Pratt. 



GIBSON ARNOLDI & GO. 

BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS. 
NOTARIES PUBLIC, Etc. 

9 Toronto St., Toronto. 

CAPITAL FURNISHED TO AID 
INDUSTRIAL CONCERNS. 

Representatives in London, Liverpool, 
Manchester, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Chi- 
cago, and New York, and Paris, France. 

GENERAL COMMERCIAL 
SOLICITORS. 




First-class FARM FENCING 

only 30 cents per ROD 



For Sale by With Discount to Dealers. 

The Ontario Wire Fencing Co., 

PICTON, ONT. Limited. 



' T\ 7 



RELAYING RAILSv 



Correspondence Solicited. 

IIMNA/EIIIM 



FOR SALE ^— — — - 

125 tons 65-lb. Relaying Steel Rails with plates. 

475 tons 56-lb. Relaying Steel Rails with plates. 

80 tons 25-lb. Relaying Steel Rails with plates. 

30 tons 14-lb. Relaying Steel Rails with plates. 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 

BIROS., - Montreal 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HINTS ON SOLDERING. 

THF. following is from Ironmonger, 
London, England : " Wo have pre- 
viously devoted some space to a 
description of solders and of soldering 
fluxes. We now propose to complete the 
series by some hints on the actual pro- 
cess of soldering'. The former notices 
dealt with material. We now treat • >i 
work. To beain with soft soldering, 
which may be done in two ways. In one 
the soldering-iron is used and in the 
other the blowpipe. The latter is prefer- 
able wherever practicable. It does better 
work, it gives a considerable saving in 
time, anil less experienced and therefore 
less costly labor can be put upon it. 
Against these advantages we must place 
the cost of the gas. A usual form of 
blowpipe is a soldering-lamp, to which is 
provided a "blast of air from a fan-bel- 
lows or pump. The flame may be either 
gas or petroleum. The latter possesses 
efficiency for soft-soldering but not for 
hard soldering. The' mouth blowpipe is 
another form, but, although marvellous 
results can be got from it when used by 
an expert, some skill and practice in its 
use are required, and it is only occas- 
ionally found in a workshop devoted to 
ordinary work. The blowpipe is impossi- 
ble for use in soldering linplate, lead, 
zinc Britannia-metal, and lacquered work, 
as it either fuses the metals or destroys 
the surfaces. The security of a soldered 
joint depends upon the amount of sur- 
face-contact of the metals being joined, 
and an imperfectly-made joint of large 
.surface may be more efficient than a per 
feet joint when the contact of the sur- 
faces is small in area. Hence, as much 
surface contact as possible should be 
allowed. The work should lit closely and 
accurately, or the solder will fall through 
and bad work result. 

' The work should be clean. Dirt and 
oxide should be removed by nitric acid, 
commonly called ' aqua fortis,' or by the 
mechanical process of filing, turning, or 
buffing. The soldering-flux may be ap- 
plied with a brush to the parts where 
the solder is expected to How, but it 
should not be allowed to spread beyond 
this area. Apply the flame < >' the blow 
pipe to the work, and with a strip of 
soft solder, previously dipped into solder 
ing-flux, touch the hot surfaces. When 
ever a sufficiently high temperature has 
been raised the solder will flow all over 
the surfaces smeared with the flux. If it 
seems to be slow in flowing more flux 
may be added. This serves to replace the 
e iporated li'ux, and also reduces the 
..c.nperature should the work have been 
overheated. 

" When using the soldering-iron the 
popper bit should be filed clean and heat- 
ed sufficiently to melt the solder. Then 
the point should be dipped into the flux, 



an. I rubbed against the solder until it is 
tinned up about an inch from the point. 
It the bit is overheated the operation 
must be gone over again. Apply the 
flux to the surfaces of the metal with the 
brush, iind press the solder against the 
bolt, when the solder will flow upon the 
fluxed surface and the joint is made. 

" Hard soldering or brazing is a more 
difficult process. The borax should be in 
tine powder and the spelter clean. The 
latter may be washed with water and 
mixed with borax and clean water. A 
lontr-handled spoon is required to apply 
the solder to the work when hot. A flat- 
tened wire will do. Before applying the 
blowpipe care should be taken in tying 
the pieces of work together, unless their 
shapes are such that they dovetail or lit 
into each other naturally. This is fre- 
quently the most difficult part of the 
work. In making one or more butt 
joints in a straight line it is often neces- 
sary to adopt a device such as a strong 
piece of wire or ' backbone,' against 
which the pieces of metal may be lied 
If possible the work should be tied in 
more than one place, and it must be 
remembered that two line wires hold the 
work more firmly than one wire of 
thicker gauge. When the work is ready 
apply the spelter and borax to the sur- 
faces. For certain classes of work, such 
as cycle-frame building, specially prepared 
brazing-rings, made of solder and borax, 
may be nsci\. To apply the flame the 
blowpipe should lie held sufficiently near 
the work so that the middle of the flame, 
not the tip, plays upon the metals. 
otherwise the borax may be oxidized be- 
fore the melting point has been reached, 
and the solder will fail in its duty. When 
the two pieces of metal being brazed 
differ materially in thickness heat the 
thicker first. Should a heavy casting 
and a light stamping be under treatment 
the casting should be heated to bright 
red ami the stamping only warmed a few 
seconds when the fusing-heat has been 
almost reached. The blowpipe must be 
moved about to allow the flame to heat 
the whole surface uniformly. Otherwise 
one part may have reached fusing-heat 
while another is still below it, the re- 
sult being an imperfect union. When the 
proper heat has been reached apply with 
the spoon or iron more mixture of spel- 
ter and borax, and maintain the heat 
until it is seen that they have flowed be- 
tween the surfaces as desired. When a 
metal of the precise nature of which the 
operator is ignorant is being soldered 
care should be taken to avoid overheat- 
ing, as it may be found to fuse at a 
lower temperature than that expected. 
However instructive hints upon a subject 
like this may be, it is only by experi- 
ence and observation, and possibly by a 
few failures, that the workman can pro- 
duce work of a uniformly high quality." 



E. A. WILLS BANQUETTED. 

MR. E. A. WILLS, the retiring 
Secretary of the Toronto Board 
of Trade, was banqueted by his 
numerous friends of the National Club 
and the Board of Trade on Thursday 
evening, January 30. Mr. Edw'dd 
Gurney presided. Others present, besides 
the guest of the evening were : J. F. 
Ellis, President National Club ; Mr. A. E. 
Ames, President Board of Trade ; Hon. 
Geo. E. Foster, Lieut. -Col. Denison, W. 
K. McNaught, U. E. Thomson, A. E. 
Kemp, M.P.; Frank Arnoldi, K.C., W. J. 
Gage and Geo. A. Wills, son of Mr. 
Wills. 

Mr. Gurney, in proposing the toast, 
" Our Guest," paid a tribute to Mr. 
Wills for his modesty, his democracy, his 
sincerity, and his keen business faculties. 

Deeply affected, Mr. Wills responded by 
expressing his gratitude for the many 
times he had been the recipient of acts 
of kindness during his sojurn in Toronto. 
He was visibly affected when he touched 
on his long connection with the Board of 
Trade and the National Club. 

A resolution, making Mr. Wills an hon- 
orary life member of the club, was pre- 
sented to him by President J. F. Ellis. 
This gift was very cordially accepted. In 
proposing the toast, " Trade and Com- 
merce," Mr. Gurney said that we have at 
present to depend on the conditions of 
t ratio prevailing in the United States. We 
were not commercial but political in the 
making of our tariff. 

Hon. Geo. E. Foster paid a fitting tri- 
bute to Mr. Wills. He said that to keep 
our trade something more than the flag 
was needed. He would like to see the 
whole British Empire roll up their sleeves 
and give the commercially hostile nations 
a taste of commercial war. 

Mr. A. E. Ames eulogized Mr. Wills. He 
said we should rather take up measures 
to build up our own industries. We did 
not need to waste any time in enmity 
with the United States. We should be 
big enough to stand on our own basis. 

Lieut. -Col. Denison had also something 
in the way of praise to be added for 
Mr. Wills. He strongly urged the im- 
portance of the Canadian representatives 
to the colonial conference in London this 
year being prepared with some plan of 
action that would be definite. 



Epstein &. Ein, general merchants, * 
Louisburg, N.S., who were burned out 
in the Louisburg fire, have secured a new 
building there, where they are opening 
out with a full line of goods. 

Welsh & Nightingale, general mer- 
chants, Vancouver, B.C., have sold their 
branch store on Mount Pleasant, to A. 
Des Brisay, and in future will confine 
their attention to their store on Gren- 
ville street. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



John Bowman 

HARDWARE & COAL CO. 
LONDON, ONT. 



SKATES SKATES SKATES 

We have a large stock of Skates to dispose of 
and will fill all orders promptly at closest prices. 

Cutlery Cutlery Cutlery 



Special Lines 



Special Prices 



English and German Table and Pocket 
Cutlery, Cases, Carvers, Razors, Scis- 
sors, Pen and Pocket and Table Cutlery 
in great variety. 



isl 



rices. 



After Stock-Taking 

You will be replenishing your stock, so we wish 
to keep before your notice, "Dominion" Goods, all of which 
bear the following Trade Mark, which is a guarantee of quality: 



SHELF 
GOODS 




HEAVY 
GOODS 



Wood Screws, 

Wire Nails, (Papers), 
Bright Wire Goods, 

Wire Door Pulls, 
Steel and Brass Jack Chain, 
"Crescent" Wire Coat 

and Hat Hooks. 



Wire Nails, 
Iron and Steel, 
Brass and Copper, 
Hay Baling, 
Pulp Binding, 
Galvanized, 
Barbed. 



w 
I 

R 

E 



Bed, Blind, ) [ 

,„d Pouitr, STAPLES " ,,ht v:."A , "" to- 

Netting. J [ rence. 

BROOM, MATTRESS, BOTTLING, 
and other wires. 

Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co. 



MONTREAL 



Limited 



TORONTO 



ESTABLISHED I860. 



INCORPORATED 1895, 




Milk Cans Milk Can Tri illiniums 

TN addition to our regular lines of Milk Cans, we have 
this year introduced a new feature that is sure to be appre- 
ciated by every farmer — by sinking the handles into the 
body of Can, making them flush with body (as shown in cut) 
thereby doing away with the complaint of the handle of one Can 
knocking holes into and bruising the other Cans. 

Handles sunk in this way will carry much heavier weight, as 
well as stiffen body of the Cans. To distinguish this Can from 
our other lines, it is called the "Eureka." All our Broad 
Hoop Milk Cans are made with our Patent Roll Bottoms. 



Patented January, 1901. 



THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL, P.Q. 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, February 7, 1902. 
HARDWARE. 

BUSINESS in K« ner al hardware has 
been good this week, on the 
whole, though the severe snow- 
storm of Monday caused a day's delay 
in delivering goods throughout the city 
and still greater delay in shipping to out- 
side points. Orders in the city were given 
by telephone, while merchants in the 
country could not get here at all. Need- 
less to say, business throughout the 
country suffered much more than in Mont- 
real, Quebec, and other large centres. 
In the cities business in snowshovels was 
the best of any line in the trade. 

No changes arc to be reported in the 
prices of general hardware this week, 
though the demand on most lines for 
spring is more satisfactory, and gives 
many indications of a heavy spring busi- 
ness. Rolling mills and factories also 
report an active business this week. 

BARB WIRE.— The demand keeps up. 
The price, per 10(1 lb., f.o.b. Montreal, is 
$3.00. 

GALVANIZED WIRE.— Business in gal- 
vanized, wire remains quiet. We quote : 
Nos. 6, 7 and 8 gauge, $3.45 ; No. 9, 
$2.80; No. 10. §3.55; No. 11, $3.65; No. 



12, $2.95 , No. 13, $3.05 ; No. 14. $4.05 . 
No. 15. $4.55 : No. 16. $4.80 ; No. 17, 
$5.20 : No. 18, $5.45. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.— Trade is 
quite active. We quote bright iron and 
annealed on a base of $2.60 per 100 lb., 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton. Lon- 
don, St. John and Halifax. Net extras, 
per 100 lb. are : Coppered wire, 60c; tin- 
ned wire, $2 ; oiling, 10c; spring wire, 
$1.25; best steel wire, 75c; bright soft 
drawn. 15c; special hay-baling wire, 30c 

FINE WIRE.— There is not much doing. 
The discount is 22-J per cent. 

BRASS AND COPPER WIRE.— A small 
business is being done. Both wires are 
discounted at 60 per cent. 

FENCE STAPLES.— The trade in fence 
staples is much better this week. We 
(mote per 100-tb. keg : Bright, $2.90 ; gal- 
vanized, $3.25. 

WIRE NAILS.— There is no change to 
report in wire nails. Trade is still 
quiet. Our quotations are as follows : 
$2.55 for small lots and $2.50 for car- 
lots f.o.b. Montreal, London. Hamilton, 
Toronto, Gananoque, Brantford, Windsor, 
Out., St. John and Halifax. 

CUT NAILS. — There is a moderate in- 
quiry. We quote : $2.35 per keg for small 
lots and $2.27^ in carlots. Flour barrel 
and coopers' nails are discounted at 40 
per cent. 



HORSE NAILS.— Trade is quiet. We 
quote as follows ; "C" brand at 50 and 
7£ per cent, off and " M " brand at 60 
per cent, off on oval and new city heads 
and 66 2-3 per cent, off for new counter- 
sunk heads. 

HORSESHOES.— Business has not im- 
proved to any extent. We quote : Iron 
shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 2 and 
larger, $3.50 ; No. 1 and smaller, $3.75 ; 
snow shoes, No. 2 and larger, $3.75 ; No. 
1 and smaller, $4 ; X L steel shoes, all 
sizes, 1 to 5, No. 2 and larger, $3.60 ; 
No. I and smaller, $3.85 ; feather-weight, 
all sizes, $4.85 ; toe weight, steel shoes, 
all sizes, $5.95 f.o.b. Montreal ; f.o.b. 
Hamilton, London and Guelph, 10c. 
extra. 

SCREWS. — Trade in screws has been 
good this week. The discounts are : 
Flat head bright, 87-J and 10 per cent, 
off list ; round head bright, 82-J and 10 
per cent.; flat head brass, 80 and 10 per 
cent.; round head brass, 75 and 10 per 
cent. 

BOLTS.— Bolts and nuts have been ad- 
vanced in the United States, and at the 
next meeting of manufacturers here prices 
will be made to correspond. Spring 
orders continue to arrive freely. Our 
quotations are as follows Norway 

carriage bolts, 60 and 5 per cent. ; 
common, 55 and 5 per cent.; full square 
carriage bolts, 60 and 5 per cent.; 



Sap Pails and Spiles. 

Your customers will soon need these goods and may be asking for them 
any time now. 

If you have not yet placed your order and require either spiles or pails we 
can ship you any quantity the same day the order reaches us. 




Sa|> Pails. 

Made in six sizes in both straight and flaring patterns. 



"Eureka" Cast Iron Sap Spiles, 



The superiority of these spiles over all others is well known to